High Waist & Pleats
Here’s another great example of how higher waisted trousers can give you nice proportions between your torso and legs, and how pleats can visually break up the expanse of fabric that sits on your hips and thighs. Ignore fashion writers who say that pleats should always be avoided, or that they’re only meant for heavier set men. There’s nothing wrong with pleats if the tailoring is done well, and you can find many good examples in Old Hollywood pictures from the 1930s through ’50s. Slim the legs down a touch, if that’s to your taste. 
That polo shirt, incidentally, was made by Ascot Chang and is currently being sold through The Armoury (where the model above, Nick, works). You could wear it underneath a sport coat for a more casual look. The collar and cuffs will give you the look of a dress shirt, while the half-placket and pique cotton will prevent you from looking like you just came from the office. 
(via philosophyofthewellfed)

High Waist & Pleats

Here’s another great example of how higher waisted trousers can give you nice proportions between your torso and legs, and how pleats can visually break up the expanse of fabric that sits on your hips and thighs. Ignore fashion writers who say that pleats should always be avoided, or that they’re only meant for heavier set men. There’s nothing wrong with pleats if the tailoring is done well, and you can find many good examples in Old Hollywood pictures from the 1930s through ’50s. Slim the legs down a touch, if that’s to your taste. 

That polo shirt, incidentally, was made by Ascot Chang and is currently being sold through The Armoury (where the model above, Nick, works). You could wear it underneath a sport coat for a more casual look. The collar and cuffs will give you the look of a dress shirt, while the half-placket and pique cotton will prevent you from looking like you just came from the office. 

(via philosophyofthewellfed)

Ralph Lauren Vintage

The year that Ralph Lauren launched his “RL Vintage” website, Newsweek published an article about the appeal of old Ralph Lauren clothes. An excerpt:

RL Vintage” comes in response to a phenomenon that even David Lauren didn’t know about at first. Five years ago, when the brand was looking to commemorate its 40th birthday, executives discovered there were fans who might be celebrating harder than they were. They found a store in Tokyo that sells only vintage Ralph Lauren, with pieces dating back to the 1970s. There was a Japanese magazine devoted to heritage Americana that had an entire issue on old Ralph Lauren pieces. In the United States, a club of Lauren collectors was limited to 67 members, in honor of the year the master first began producing clothes. David Lauren takes out his iPhone and searches eBay for his father’s name: 309,119 items come up (including a life-size aluminum nude that’s supposed to be of his father and that he didn’t know existed). “There is a cult of Ralph Lauren that is kind of amazing,” he says, mentioning the block-long crowds that form at an appearance by dad, now 73.

You can read the rest of the article here. The RL Vintage site — which has been inactive for a long time now, unfortunately — also has a page dedicated to vintage RL collectors. Worth a look, if you haven’t seen it already. 

It’s On Sale: 3sixteen Jeans
3sixteen has their two-tone stitched jeans on sale (where the jeans have two different colors for the stitching). These are marked down about 25% from the regular price, and come in the company’s black and indigo denim. Note, if you want their jeans without the two-tone stitching, Self Edge will most likely have them on sale later this year. They typically do a sale once a season, and at a discount percentage that matches the year (so this year, it’ll be 14% off, most likely). 
Also on sale is this camp stool, which I want for no good reason. 

It’s On Sale: 3sixteen Jeans

3sixteen has their two-tone stitched jeans on sale (where the jeans have two different colors for the stitching). These are marked down about 25% from the regular price, and come in the company’s black and indigo denim. Note, if you want their jeans without the two-tone stitching, Self Edge will most likely have them on sale later this year. They typically do a sale once a season, and at a discount percentage that matches the year (so this year, it’ll be 14% off, most likely). 

Also on sale is this camp stool, which I want for no good reason. 

eBay Roundup

Pretty big footwear selection today, with some notable finds, such as these Edward Green double monkstraps, Crockett & Jones scotch grain bluchers, and Yuketen suede chukkas. The photos for the last two aren’t as sexy as the first, but I think they’d make for some great fall footwear. 

To find more menswear related auctions on eBay, try using our customized search links. They’ll help you quickly narrow in on high-end suitsgood suitshigh-quality shirts and fine footwear

Suits, sport coats, and blazers
Outerwear
Sweaters and knits
Shirts and pants
Shoes
Ties
Bags, briefcases, and wallets
Misc.
“The rise of haute couture in the early 20th century dovetailed with advances in communication and travel, and so, too, the public’s unusual interest in this rarefied world. There are well-known stories of Paris policemen and taxi drivers being able to recognize couture, like a cop in the ’30s who refused to arrest a feminist agitator on the grounds that she was dressed by Molyneux. By the ’60s, everyone knew about the latest fashion, if not from Mary Quant, then from the Beatles. But sometime in the late ’80s, fashion discovered semiotics. Clothes suddenly acquired meaning (think of the efforts to “decode” a Helmut Lang show or almost any by Martin Margiela). You truly needed to be an expert to appreciate why a jacket was worn inside out or why a dress that made you look like a bag lady was cool. Susan Sontag described a similar shift in the arts in the mid-60s, noting that “the most interesting and creative art of our time is not open to the generally educated; it demands special effort; it speaks a specialized language.” Today, as high fashion moves closer to mass media — with brand-hosted YouTube channels, films, huge spectacles — there is pressure to simplify. I also wonder whether the surge of new brands — their shows often crammed with weird and banal designs — hasn’t caused elite designers to rethink matters. Hence more straightforward clothes.”

Cathy Horyn in The New York Times.

-Pete

Where is Bing Crosby’s Denim Tux?
There’s a great tale in the San Francisco Chronicle today about Bing Crosby’s denim tuxedo. The story is as follows: in the early 1950s, Bing Crosby and a friend went fishing. At the end of the day, they tried to book rooms in a local hotel, but were turned away by the clerk, because Crosby was wearing a beat-up denim jacket. A hotel manager recognized Crosby and corrected the error, but the story went the equivalent of viral.
Back in San Francisco, the folks at Levi’s heard the story, and so they made Crosby a custom denim tuxedo, with a boutonniere of Levi’s labels. Crosby liked it so much, he wore it while promoting his new movie, and it became something of a legend.
Crosby’s niece has been searching for the tux for years. Complicating matters are the many replicas Levi’s made for shop windows at the time. In fact, Levi’s Vintage Clothing recently made a new set of reproductions in a very limited quantity.
She says she knows the difference, and Levi’s has given her a letter that attests to her knowledge, but she won’t tell anyone, because one of the imposters might be altered.
Will she find her “holy grail”? Only time will tell.

Where is Bing Crosby’s Denim Tux?

There’s a great tale in the San Francisco Chronicle today about Bing Crosby’s denim tuxedo. The story is as follows: in the early 1950s, Bing Crosby and a friend went fishing. At the end of the day, they tried to book rooms in a local hotel, but were turned away by the clerk, because Crosby was wearing a beat-up denim jacket. A hotel manager recognized Crosby and corrected the error, but the story went the equivalent of viral.

Back in San Francisco, the folks at Levi’s heard the story, and so they made Crosby a custom denim tuxedo, with a boutonniere of Levi’s labels. Crosby liked it so much, he wore it while promoting his new movie, and it became something of a legend.

Crosby’s niece has been searching for the tux for years. Complicating matters are the many replicas Levi’s made for shop windows at the time. In fact, Levi’s Vintage Clothing recently made a new set of reproductions in a very limited quantity.

She says she knows the difference, and Levi’s has given her a letter that attests to her knowledge, but she won’t tell anyone, because one of the imposters might be altered.

Will she find her “holy grail”? Only time will tell.

American Quilts and Coverlets

It’s not a big jump from appreciating menswear to appreciating textiles, and the greatest of all American textile arts has to be traditional quilts and coverlets. These are partly about function, partly about art, and partly about the stories and communities they represent. 

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has a particularly good slideshow with some beautiful examples of this craft. An excerpt from the accompanying article:

Bed quilts and coverlets, appliquéd, pieced, embroidered, or woven, are some of the few handmade objects that were created by American women to express their artistry and skill. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, women of all social strata made quilts and coverlets. Although many of these were meant to be primarily utilitarian, they were often designed to be pleasing to the eye as well, and sometimes they were imbued with significance far beyond being simple covers for a bed. During the heyday of quiltmaking in the nineteenth century, America’s increasingly mobile population was moving westward, settling in the wilderness. Easily portable, and certainly necessary, bedcovers might be some of the few decorative objects a woman had in her home. Bedcovers were often wedding gifts, or made by a young woman to take with her to her future husband’s house. If that new home was distant from friends and family, a bedcover became an important keepsake from her old life. Quilts were also made to celebrate the birth of a child, as gifts to thank important members of the community such as the local minister, and even sometimes in the remembrance of the dead.

[…]

Another popular type of bedcovering during the second quarter of the nineteenth century was the woven wool and cotton coverlet. While the earliest of these coverlets could have been woven in the home, professionally woven coverlets were more common by the end of the 1820s. They were made by mostly male weavers who set up shop in rural communities throughout the East Coast and Midwestern states. These independent weavers made coverlets, table coverings, and carpets for the local market. Many were immigrants from the British Isles or Germany, both places with large weaving industries firmly in place by the nineteenth century. 

You can read the rest of the article here at The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s website, and check out some more beautiful quilts at the National Museum of American History. The second site is especially nice in that it allows you to zoom in on the pictures, so that you can appreciate the creative use of texture in each of these pieces. 

Our Beloved Sponsors

Twice a month, we like to thank those companies that make our blog possible. We have five sponsors to thank this month, one of which is an old, returning supporter of ours – Ledbury.

First, however, we want to thank The Hanger Project for their support. They’ve been busy building out the shoe care end of their business. Not only do they have a wide range of products — from specialized conditioners and cleaners to leather shoe shine mats — but they also have a full shoe care guide for any maintenance technique you can think of. In addition, they hold shoe shine contests at their StyleForum affiliate page every other Sunday. Participants stand a chance at winning a prize, while everyone else can just take inspiration. 

Our next sponsor Gustin has some new projects on deck. There’s a pair of khaki colored jeans, which can be used as a slightly more rugged version of your standard chinos, as well as a few plaid flannel shirts that can be worn underneath waxed cotton coats and chunky knit sweaters. Gustin also just completed a lookbook, with their model showing off some of the projects they’ve put together recently. In the above, there are some Gustin jeans, dotted indigo shirts, chambray shirts, Army green chore coats, and waxed cotton duffle bags — all of which Gustin produced through their crowdsourcing model.

Next, Chipp Neckwear just got in their Matka cloth ties, which are slubby silk ties that are similar to raw silk. Unfortunately, professional photos are still being taken, so I shot some of my shantung ties for comparison. Chipp’s ties will be like those, but made in NYC and ever-so-slightly more textured in their weave. The good news? They’re offering them to our readers at a discounted price of $35. Ties are available in traditonal four-in-hand and bow tie styles, with eight available colors in each (you can see the colors in the swatches above). To order, you’ll have to call Paul at (212) 687-0850 or email him here. Once they hit the site at the end of this week, the price will jump up to $42.50.

Finally, we want to thank Proper Cloth and Ledbury. Proper Cloth is an online made-to-measure shirt company that allows you to design your own shirts. Ledbury does ready-to-wear shirts, in both standard, “ready-for-the-office” designs and things that are a bit more creative (there are some shirts on there right now with bright birds and boats). 

If you want to advertise on Put This On, just email us at contact@putthison.com.

John Oliver on police militarization and Ferguson, Missouri.
Your Sunday Square
This week’s featured Put This On pocket square is made of vintage Japanese cotton. We don’t know exactly how old the fabric is, but my best guess is about forty years. It’s gorgeous, and like all our cotton squares, it’s just $45.
You can (and should!) check out dozens more styles in our shop.
(Thanks to Xyloart for choosing it!)

Your Sunday Square

This week’s featured Put This On pocket square is made of vintage Japanese cotton. We don’t know exactly how old the fabric is, but my best guess is about forty years. It’s gorgeous, and like all our cotton squares, it’s just $45.

You can (and should!) check out dozens more styles in our shop.

(Thanks to Xyloart for choosing it!)