Our Biggest Pocket Square Sale EVER!

We’ve got some beautiful new pocket squares coming in from our atelier in the next couple of weeks, and our shelves here at the office are pretty full. That means good news for you, the pocket square consumer. A chance to stock up big time on our beautiful, hand-made, hand-rolled, ultra-limited accessories.

Here’s the deal: buy $250 worth of pocket squares this week, and we’ll give you a hundred dollars off. A HUNDRED DOLLARS! This is literally the deepest discount we’ve ever offered. It even applies to stuff that’s already on sale.

Just visit our shop, fill up your cart, and use the code DOINGITBIG for your discount. Shop now, though, because this all ends Friday.

eBay Roundup
This Nigel Cabourn jacket is great if you can stomach the price. When worn, it basically looks like this (although obviously in a different color). I have the same coat in a darker green and use it as a casual, all-purpose jacket during the fall months. The coated surface makes it suitable for the rain. 
Want to find more menswear related auctions on eBay? Try using our customized search links. They’ll help you quickly narrow in on high-end suits, good suits, high-quality shirts and fine footwear. 
Outerwear

Green Nigel Cabourn jacket, 38
Tan Nanamica Cruiser, S
Navy field jacket, M
Nike field jacket, M
Nigel Cabourn Aircraft jacket, M
Navy parka, M
Tan Wings + Horns jacket, M
Hooded Kapital jacket, L
Tan shawl collar jacket, L
Blue Engineered Garments jacket, L
Grey chore coat, L
Barbour Skyfall jacket, L
RRL aviator jacket, L
Gray Engineered Garments jacket, L
Grey double breasted coat, 43
Red mountain parka, XL
Barbour fishing jacket, XL
Nigel Cabourn Surface jacket, 44 (same model as pictured above)
Barbour x To Ki To jacket, XL
Grey Engineered Garments herringbone jacket, XL
Navy Engineered Garments jacket, XL
Suede A-1 jacket, 44
Brown B1 Nigel Cabourn jacket, XL
A2 jacket, 46

Sweaters and knits

Green sweatshirt, S
Charcoal sweater, S
Black SNS Herning sweater, S
Charcoal Shaggy Dog sweater, M
Tan Patrik Ervell pocket sweater, L
Grey sweatshirt, L
Green Shaggy Dog sweater, L
Blue Shetland sweaters (L, L, XL)

Shirts and pants

Sashiko stitched shirt, XXS
Red plaid shirt, S
Chambray, M
Blue OCBD, L
Red plaid shirt, L
Tan plaid shirt, L
Iron Heart t-shirt, XL
Red checked shirt, XXL
Mister Freedom jeans, 34

Shoes

Russell Moccasin boots, various sizes
Crockett & Jones cap toe boots, 7
Ralph Lauren semi-brogues, 7.5
Ralph Lauren shell cordovan shortwings, 8
Ralph Lauren penny loafers, 9
RRL engineer boots, 9
Vass cap toe oxfords, 9
New & Lingwood suede tassel loafers, 10
Yuketen moccasins, 10
Ralph Lauren shell cordovan boots, 10.5
Ralph Lauren shell cordovan penny loafers, 10.5
Nigel Cabourn x Viberg work boots, 11
Visvim grizzly boots, 11
Yuketen moc toe boots, 11
Quoddy moc toe bluchers, 11.5
Florsheim shell cordovan longwings, 13
JM Weston suede penny loafers, 13
Allen Edmonds shell cordovan penny loafers, 14


Ties

Striped Rubinacci knit tie
Black pindot tie (1, 2)
Blue floral tie
Glen plaid tie
Red grenadine
Green grenadine

Bags, briefcases, and wallets

Filson duffle
Black alligator wallets (1, 2)
Tan Filson briefcase
Tusting leather satchel
SAB suitcase

Misc.

Pajamas, L
Unicorn scarf for women
Crockett & Jones belts, 36 (1, 2, 3)

If you want access to an extra roundup every week, exclusive to members, join Put This On’s Inside Track for just five bucks a month.

eBay Roundup

This Nigel Cabourn jacket is great if you can stomach the price. When worn, it basically looks like this (although obviously in a different color). I have the same coat in a darker green and use it as a casual, all-purpose jacket during the fall months. The coated surface makes it suitable for the rain. 

Want to find more menswear related auctions on eBay? Try using our customized search links. They’ll help you quickly narrow in on high-end suitsgood suitshigh-quality shirts and fine footwear

Outerwear
Sweaters and knits
Shirts and pants
Shoes
Ties
Bags, briefcases, and wallets
Misc.
If you want access to an extra roundup every week, exclusive to members, join Put This On’s Inside Track for just five bucks a month.

Our Beloved Sponsors

A quick thanks to our five sponsors this month for their support. Our first sponsor, The Hanger Project, just got a bunch of new neckwear and knitwear in. Lots of textured Drake’s ties, made from tussah and shantung (good for the warmer months), wool/ silk blends (for the colder seasons), and grenadines (for year round). For sweaters, they also have some new pieces from Inis Meain, a small, high-end manufacturer located on one of the Aran Islands. Included are some “celebration knits,” which are highly decorative pieces that people on those islands would traditionally wear for special occasions. 

Our second sponsor Gustin does online crowdsourcing campaigns for raw, selvedge denim jeans, workshirts, and rugged outerwear. Since they don’t stock any inventory, and sell directly to customers, they can offer much lower prices (as they don’t have to pay for middle man markups and account for unsold inventory). At the moment, some of their projects include black denim jeans, plaid flannel shirts, waxed trucker jackets, and a couple of small, leather goods. The downside? Once campaigns hit 100% funding, the opportunity to get in on the project closes, and everything is sent to production. 

Next, Proper Cloth just finished up their first fashion show with Esquire Magazine. They’re an online custom shirtmaker, but are working to close the gap between made-to-measure and ready-to-wear. Delivery times have been compressed to one to two weeks, and they’ve designed “collections” of pre-designed shirts, which you can adjust to your measurements. Of course, you can also just design your own shirt from scratch, and if you’re uncomfortable with taking self-measurements, you can also send them your best fitting shirt for them to copy. They’ll replicate the fit, but make you a new shirt according to your fabric and style selections. 

Lastly, we want to give a warm thank you to Ledbury and Chipp Neckwear. Ledbury just released a ton of new “short run” shirts in a range of basic stripes and checks, which could be used for both professional and casual settings. Chipp also just started a blog, where Paul (the company’s founder) will talk about some of his experiences being in the rag trade for over fifty years now. 

If you want to advertise on Put This On, just email us at contact@putthison.com.

The kind folks at New Hampshire Public Radio’s Word of Mouth invited me on their Bad Impressions show to talk about how clothing can help make a bad impression. I tried not to be too intolerant, but did speak out against muscle shirts. Specifically, I said that generally speaking, I don’t want to be able to look sideways into a man’s shirt.

(Source: jessethorn)

Chipp’s New Matka Cloth Ties

We’ve been longtime fans of Chipp Neckwear, well before they became one of our sponsors. The reason is, simply, they offer great value in men’s accessories for the budget-minded consumer. Chipp’s ties are handmade in NYC, using the same fabrics as top-tier producers, but come at a price of $40-50, instead of your usual $100-150. Plus, you get a bit of cool provenance with Chipp. They were a famous clothier during the heyday of classic American style and served as President Kennedy’s tailor (along with his brother Bobby). Very well regarded among the Ivy Style crowd.

So what’s the tradeoff? Well, less “artisanal” construction, mostly. On Drake’s ties, for example, you’ll find that the back of the two blades are “tipped” with a fine silk or some other high-quality material, and if they’re not, the edges are then handrolled. With Chipp’s ties, the edges are flat and folded – much like what you’d find at Brooks Brothers or Ralph Lauren – and the ends are tipped with polyester, rather than silk. Less desirable for the guy who wants something made as finely as possible, but a wonderful value for anyone who doesn’t want to pay $100-150 for a tie.

In the past couple of months, the owner of Chipp (Paul) has been working on a new collection of Matka cloth ties. Matka cloth, for those unfamiliar, is an India fabric made from spun silk. It’s slubby and textured, much like raw silk, tussah, and shantung, but is woven in a sort of burlap weave. Like those aforementioned materials, it gives some nice visual interest in the warmer months to a suit or sport coat. Think of it as a more seasonal version of grenadine – something textured, but solid colored, which makes it easy to pair with a wide range of shirts and jackets. 

For the time being, Chipp’s Matka cloth ties are $35 a piece, but they’ll go up to $42.50 once Paul gets around to putting them up on his site. Widths are very classic and middle-of-the-road (3.25” for four-in-hands; 2.5” for bow ties). To order, you’ll have to email or call, or visit the shop in NYC. To figure out what colors you’re looking at, you can click the photos above and see their descriptions (note, bow ties are missing in two of the photos, but they’re available for order). You can also follow Chipp on a new blog they’ve set up.

Dressing Like a Grownup in the NBA
The story Sarah Lyall was researching in August on the NBA’s Rookie Transition Program was recently published:

The league has a “business-casual” dress code, a look foreign to most of the rookies, whose closets are full of jeans and sweatpants. Every gentleman should have a peacoat, a raincoat, a varsity jacket and an overcoat, she said; also a blue suit, a gray suit and a black suit. Cargo pants are versatile and can be dressed up to look fancier than they are. You can mix and match; the navy jacket will look just fine with the black pants. Do not use the same Irish Spring soap on your face that you use under your arms. When you leave the house, throw on a classic watch and your signature fragrance, and assume that you are being observed at all times.

Can’t say I agree with the RTP’s recs now, but the advice would have served me well at 19 years old. Pictured is Marcus Smart, 6th pick in the 2014 NBA draft and current Boston Celtic. On draft night he paid tribute to Oklahoma State, his native Texas, his mother, and late brother via a custom printed jacket lining. Photo by Eric White.
-Pete

Dressing Like a Grownup in the NBA

The story Sarah Lyall was researching in August on the NBA’s Rookie Transition Program was recently published:

The league has a “business-casual” dress code, a look foreign to most of the rookies, whose closets are full of jeans and sweatpants. Every gentleman should have a peacoat, a raincoat, a varsity jacket and an overcoat, she said; also a blue suit, a gray suit and a black suit. Cargo pants are versatile and can be dressed up to look fancier than they are. You can mix and match; the navy jacket will look just fine with the black pants. Do not use the same Irish Spring soap on your face that you use under your arms. When you leave the house, throw on a classic watch and your signature fragrance, and assume that you are being observed at all times.

Can’t say I agree with the RTP’s recs now, but the advice would have served me well at 19 years old. Pictured is Marcus Smart, 6th pick in the 2014 NBA draft and current Boston Celtic. On draft night he paid tribute to Oklahoma State, his native Texas, his mother, and late brother via a custom printed jacket lining. Photo by Eric White.

-Pete

“Pockets are a must, for storing your necessaries. Knife, money, tobacco, frogs, string, marbles, bullets. Read your Twain for suggested pocket wares.” — Nick Offerman prescribes your everyday carry
Your Sunday Square: A Rayon Aquatic Scene
Perhaps I’m inspired by the fact that my son is in the other room right now, watching The Little Mermaid, but this is one of my favorites in our shop. It’s a classic late 40s / early 50s color combination, though I suppose it’s possible that it’s a bit older than that.
I can’t begin to tell you how many hours I’ve spent at shows, with vintage fabric dealers and online searching for the perfect pieces of “cold” rayon for our squares. They call it cold rayon because of its cool, smooth hand, which makes it lovely for pocket squares. It hasn’t really been made like that since the 50s or so, when uber-cheap (and slightly gross) Dacron polyester started to replace it.
We’ve got more than a dozen rayon designs in our shop right now. They range from plain white dots on a burgundy ground to wild tropicals.
And how about this? Order something today, and you can use the code TROPICAL15 for 15 percent off anything. Take a look at what we’ve got on offer.

Your Sunday Square: A Rayon Aquatic Scene

Perhaps I’m inspired by the fact that my son is in the other room right now, watching The Little Mermaid, but this is one of my favorites in our shop. It’s a classic late 40s / early 50s color combination, though I suppose it’s possible that it’s a bit older than that.

I can’t begin to tell you how many hours I’ve spent at shows, with vintage fabric dealers and online searching for the perfect pieces of “cold” rayon for our squares. They call it cold rayon because of its cool, smooth hand, which makes it lovely for pocket squares. It hasn’t really been made like that since the 50s or so, when uber-cheap (and slightly gross) Dacron polyester started to replace it.

We’ve got more than a dozen rayon designs in our shop right now. They range from plain white dots on a burgundy ground to wild tropicals.

And how about this? Order something today, and you can use the code TROPICAL15 for 15 percent off anything. Take a look at what we’ve got on offer.

Put This On’s Inside Track for the week of September 13th - September 20th

Here are our hand-selected favorites from eBay for this week, plus heads-up on recommended sales. If you’re a member of the Inside Track, click through, and log in with your Member.ly username and password.

If you’re not a member, you can join now for just $5 a month - you’ll get access to one of these members-only lists every week, and your membership supports Put This On. 

See the rest →

When Undergrads Wore Tailcoats to Parties
Ivy Style somehow tracked down the man you see above. In the photo, when Life Magazine shot him for a 1954 issue that featured J. Press, he was being fitted for a soft shouldered, 3/2 roll, tweed sport coat. The photo has circulated forums and blogs for many, many years now, making it a famous image that every guy interested in classic American style has seen — oh, I don’t know — maybe a 1,000 times.
Apparently, the student originally came in to be fitted for his custom tailcoat. As Ivy Style reports:

It was the fall of 1954 when a simple errand put him on a collision course with Ivy style history. “J. Press, or J. Squeeze as we called it, was the New Haven substitute for Brooks Brothers,” says Brown. “Best I can remember was that I had walked in to check on tails they were making for me.” 
[…]
Many Ivy devotees have mooned over the jacket he is wearing in the photo. “I don’t think I bought that jacket,” Brown recalls. “As I remember, they wanted to feature it and it fit.”
The tailcoat he’d commissioned was another matter. It saw plenty of action during the debutante season. “There were a lot of great coming-out parties with lots of alcohol, legal then,” he recalls. “I remember rolling down the hill of John Nicholas Brown’s daughter’s coming-out in those tails, to the breakfast tent at 2 AM. That house is now Harbour Court, the New York Yacht club station in Newport.”

There was a time when some undergrads commissioned custom tailcoats to get drunk at parties! You can go over to Ivy Style to read the whole thing.

When Undergrads Wore Tailcoats to Parties

Ivy Style somehow tracked down the man you see above. In the photo, when Life Magazine shot him for a 1954 issue that featured J. Press, he was being fitted for a soft shouldered, 3/2 roll, tweed sport coat. The photo has circulated forums and blogs for many, many years now, making it a famous image that every guy interested in classic American style has seen — oh, I don’t know — maybe a 1,000 times.

Apparently, the student originally came in to be fitted for his custom tailcoat. As Ivy Style reports:

It was the fall of 1954 when a simple errand put him on a collision course with Ivy style history. “J. Press, or J. Squeeze as we called it, was the New Haven substitute for Brooks Brothers,” says Brown. “Best I can remember was that I had walked in to check on tails they were making for me.” 

[…]

Many Ivy devotees have mooned over the jacket he is wearing in the photo. “I don’t think I bought that jacket,” Brown recalls. “As I remember, they wanted to feature it and it fit.”

The tailcoat he’d commissioned was another matter. It saw plenty of action during the debutante season. “There were a lot of great coming-out parties with lots of alcohol, legal then,” he recalls. “I remember rolling down the hill of John Nicholas Brown’s daughter’s coming-out in those tails, to the breakfast tent at 2 AM. That house is now Harbour Court, the New York Yacht club station in Newport.”

There was a time when some undergrads commissioned custom tailcoats to get drunk at parties! You can go over to Ivy Style to read the whole thing.