Uniqlo’s Flannels

I picked up a couple of Uniqlo flannels last month and have been happily surprised by how often I turn to them for casual wear. They’re admittedly pretty simple — no high-end materials or unique detailing — but they come at fraction of the price that designer labels are charging these days. Plus, these are plaid flannel shirts — the kind of staple that was part of the thrifted ’90s grunge look, which designers such as Hedi Slimane have been ripping off and repackaging for 100x the price. The cheap versions are arguably the originals. 

Like most non-workwear flannels, these are thin, which makes them great for layering. You can wear one open, layered over a t-shirt, with the sleeves rolled up so you don’t look too stuffy. When the weather gets cold, you can also throw on a jacket. I like field jackets in this case, but leather ones also work well. This makes for a nice, comfortable look, without any of the bulkiness that a thicker flannel might bring. 

If you wear a flannel shirt on its own, however, then you might want to add what Jesse sometimes calls a "point of distinction." That means something to set what you’re wearing apart, so it doesn’t look too simple or boring. For me, this would be a pair of really beat-up jeans and some tan jodhpur boots, which is a type of strapped ankle boot similar to the Chelsea. I also like wearing my flannels with a mid-length steerhide wallet and some jewelry I bought from Self Edge

At full retail, Uniqlo’s flannels cost $30, but you can sometimes find them on sale for $20 (which is how much I paid for mine). For something more affordable, try visiting your local thrift storeAfter all, many of those higher-end flannels are just inspired by thrift store finds. In a recent talk with The Fashion Law, Courtney Love said of the Saint Laurent FW13 collection: “It reminds me of Value Village. Real grunge. I love that rich ladies are going to pay a fortune to look like we used to look when we had nothing.

Pictured above: Green field jacket from Aspesi; white pocket t-shirt from Barns, red plaid flannel shirt from Uniqlo; straight legged jeans from 3sixteen; tan jodhpur boots from Ralph Lauren; mid-length wallet from The Flat Head; bracelet and necklace from Self Edge; and horsehide Clint Stitch belt from Don’t Mourn Organize.

Our Beloved Sponsors

Twice a month, we like to thank our sponsors for their support. It’s because of them that we’re able to bring you our blog content every day.

Our first sponsor this month, The Hanger Project, just got a bunch of fall neckties in from Drake’s. They’re made from pure wool or wool blends, and feature the kind of soft, earth-toned colors that most of us wear this time of year. The advantage of wool ties is that they absorb light, rather than reflect it, which allows you to add a little visual interest to a tweed or flannel jacket. You can pair one with a silk pocket square, so there’s a little balance between the matte look of your tie and the sheen of your square.

Next, Gustin is continuing to roll out new projects with their zero waste, direct-to-consumer, crowdsourcing business model. They’re most famous for their raw, selvedge denim jeans, but they’ve got plenty of other stuff as well. Right now, there’s a black canvas trucker jacket, a waxed brown chore coat, eight designs for casual shirts, and a handful leather goods (belts, wallets, and key fobs). Just note that the window to buy closes once projects reach 100% funding, so space is limited.

Our third sponsor, Proper Cloth, also has some new stuff in. They’ve added some premium fabrics from Thomas Mason’s Goldline to their shirting collection (Thomas Mason being a famous division of the Albini Group, a high-end fabric producer in Italy). They’ve also added some new fall jacket styles to their line-up, as well as their first two suit offerings. The suits and sport coats are ready-to-wear, while the shirts are completely customizable (down to the fit).

Finally, our thanks to Ledbury and Chipp Neckwear. Ledbury just put up their new season’s collection of sweaters (lots of finely knit mocknecks and v-necks at the moment), and Chipp just restocked their Italian knit ties, and plans to get some new ancient madder styles later this week.

If you want to advertise on Put This On, just email us at contact@putthison.com.

If you live in Southern California, come out and see me at a live taping of my NPR show, Bullseye on October 15th. It’s really going to be an amazing time, with Dan Harmon, the creator of Community, music from Sara Watkins and comedy from Steve Agee and Andy Kindler, two of the best in the business. Best of all, our venue is the Masonic Lodge at Hollywood Forever Cemetery, which is an actual, beautiful, pristinely preserved Masonic lodge.  I’m even doing a meet-and-greet afterwards if you want to say hi and have a drink.
Tickets are only $20, and it’s an intimate room, so grab yours right now.

If you live in Southern California, come out and see me at a live taping of my NPR show, Bullseye on October 15th. It’s really going to be an amazing time, with Dan Harmon, the creator of Community, music from Sara Watkins and comedy from Steve Agee and Andy Kindler, two of the best in the business. Best of all, our venue is the Masonic Lodge at Hollywood Forever Cemetery, which is an actual, beautiful, pristinely preserved Masonic lodge.  I’m even doing a meet-and-greet afterwards if you want to say hi and have a drink.

Tickets are only $20, and it’s an intimate room, so grab yours right now.

eBay Roundup

Among today’s finds today are these amazing Apparel Arts issues. Apparel Arts, for those unfamiliar, was a menswear trade publication in the 1930s, which showed the best of men’s fashion. These issues pop up on eBay from time to time, so they’re not that unusual to find, but they tend to go for really high prices. The upside to these particular auctions is that the seller has some really nice, high-quality scans of some of the pages, for those who don’t want to drop a couple hundred bucks for a book. Give them a look. 

As usual, you can use our customized search links to find more menswear related auctions. They’ll help you narrow in on high-end suitsgood suitshigh-quality shirts and fine footwear

Suits, sports coats, and blazers

Outerwear
Sweaters and knits
Shirts and pants
Shoes
Ties
Bags, briefcases, and wallets
Misc.
If you want access to an extra roundup every week, exclusive to members, join Put This On’s Inside Track for just five bucks a month.
The Daring ’70s and ’80s
The Washington Post digs through their photo archive to look at some of the daring fashions of the ’70s and early ’80s. (Included is an early photo of British designer Paul Smith!)

The Daring ’70s and ’80s

The Washington Post digs through their photo archive to look at some of the daring fashions of the ’70s and early ’80s. (Included is an early photo of British designer Paul Smith!)

It’s On Sale: J. Crew
40% off final sale items today at J. Crew. I spotted two items that look pretty nice. A beige linen Barbour coat ($198 with the discount) and a faded indigo shirt from J. Crew’s higher-end Wallace & Barnes line ($60 with the discount). Just note that all sales are final and the promotion ends today. Use the code SHOPASAP at checkout.

It’s On Sale: J. Crew

40% off final sale items today at J. Crew. I spotted two items that look pretty nice. A beige linen Barbour coat ($198 with the discount) and a faded indigo shirt from J. Crew’s higher-end Wallace & Barnes line ($60 with the discount). Just note that all sales are final and the promotion ends today. Use the code SHOPASAP at checkout.

Most Common Types of Denim Damage (and How to Avoid Them)

Coincidentally, shortly after Jesse’s post last week on patching jeans, I received my 3sixteens back from Denim Therapy — one of the many shops nowadays that specializes in denim repairs. Like Jesse, I’ve had my jeans for about five years now — and although they’ve already seen a trip to Self Edge’s Darn It (another speciality repair place) — they’ve experienced some more wear-and-tear in the last year and needed fixing. So, I thought I’d do a post on the most common types of denim damage and how they can be repaired, as well as avoided altogether.  

Crotch Blowouts

Crotch blowouts refer to when you get holes in the place where you least want holes. To fix them, you can use any of the methods listed in Jesse’s post, although for this specific issue, I recommend darning. That’s when a specialist “reweaves” new threads into the material, using threads that most closely match your pants. This not only makes the repair nearly invisible (which is nice since this is, um, at your crotch), but it’s also much sturdier than patching. The downside? It’s also more expensive. 

How to avoid: Wash your jeans more often. It doesn’t have to be after every wear, but it’s the combination of dirt accumulating and the fabric rubbing against itself that causes blowouts. Those dirt particles act like tiny little razors, first thinning the material, and then finally breaking it open.

Other Holes 

Areas around the thighs and knees can also wear thin and eventually break. For these repairs, you can again refer to Jesse’s post. I personally like the slightly more ad hoc method of just patching thighs and knees with a piece of cloth. Jesse’s LVC jeans look great here. A local tailor should be able to do that for you for not too much money. And if the holes aren’t too big, you can also just leave them in, like I’ve done above. Personally, I think a hole or two can give a pair of jeans some character. 

How to avoid: Again, wash your jeans more often.

Stretched Buttonholes

Whether because you’ve gained weight or initially sized too far down, the buttonholes on your jeans can stretch with time. If the damage isn’t too bad, a local tailor can reinforce the area with new stitching. If it’s really stretched out, however, then you’ll need to get the area darned. I had the second done, and you can see the results above. 

How to avoid: Raw jeans are often a bit tight at first in the waist, but you don’t have to size so far down that things feel skin tight. Doing so will just put unnecessary stress on the buttonholes. 

Damage at the Cuffs

If you wash your jeans infrequently and leave them cuffed, you’ll find that the dirt that accumulates will eventually wear through at the crease. Unfortunately, the solutions here are less than ideal. You can get the cuffs darned, but the material will be stiff and hard to fold again (you use an iron to help them along). Otherwise, you can ride them out until the cuffs fall off, at which point, a tailor can put in a new hem (which is what I’d recommend).

How to avoid: Uncuff your pants every once in a while and brush out the dirt. You can use your hand (obviously), or a clothes brush. Having a clothes brush is handy if you have tailored clothes (suits, sport coats, the like), as that’s how they should be regularly cleaned

If you’re looking for a darning service, check out Self Edge’s Darn ItDenim Therapy, and Denim Surgeon. For more suggestions, check this SuperFuture thread dedicated to denim repairs.

Pretty cool list of different types of leather grains. From C&D Jarnagin Co via Antonio Merccariello, a bespoke shoemaking house that recently wrote about the death of handmade box calf. 

Pretty cool list of different types of leather grains. From C&D Jarnagin Co via Antonio Merccariello, a bespoke shoemaking house that recently wrote about the death of handmade box calf

Put This On’s Inside Track for the week of September 28th - October 4th

Here are our hand-selected favorites from eBay for this week, plus heads-up on recommended sales. If you’re a member of the Inside Track, click through, and log in with your Member.ly username and password.

If you’re not a member, you can join now for just $5 a month - you’ll get access to one of these members-only lists every week, and your membership supports Put This On.

See the rest →

“I don’t recall anybody asking me to make them a Kanye skirt!”
-Legendary Harlem custom clothier Dapper Dan on Kanye West’s style in Dazed magazine.

“I don’t recall anybody asking me to make them a Kanye skirt!”

-Legendary Harlem custom clothier Dapper Dan on Kanye West’s style in Dazed magazine.