It’s On Sale: Stuff at Gentlemen’s Footwear

Gentlemen’s Footwear is having a storewide sale. There are three discount codes, which apply to different things:

  • Use code extra10 for non-sale shoes.
  • For one week only, from 08/25 through 08/31, you can use the code summer10 to receive an extra 10% off shoes that have already been marked down in their sale section.
  • Use code accessory20 for tie, pocket square, scarf purchases over $200. Applies to everything from Drake’s and E.G. Cappelli, including those items that have already been marked down. 

Discounts aren’t that deep, but the goods are exceptionally nice. 

Summer of White Tees: The Grand Finale!
When we do our summer of white tees, we always order a few extra in each size to cover shipping errors and the like. After we’ve gotten everyone’s orders out, we then have a few left over.
So: if you missed out last time, or want to order more, you’ve got one last chance. White and gray, all sizes (for now), $9.90 each plus shipping. If they’re gone, they’re gone. They’ll ship promptly because we want the pile out of our office :).
Order here.

Summer of White Tees: The Grand Finale!

When we do our summer of white tees, we always order a few extra in each size to cover shipping errors and the like. After we’ve gotten everyone’s orders out, we then have a few left over.

So: if you missed out last time, or want to order more, you’ve got one last chance. White and gray, all sizes (for now), $9.90 each plus shipping. If they’re gone, they’re gone. They’ll ship promptly because we want the pile out of our office :).

Order here.

Activity Trackers and Wearable Technology
I’m late to the whole activity tracker thing, but when Nike offloaded a bunch of FuelBands on Gilt earlier this year, I picked one up in the hopes of seeing how well they work. Activity trackers, for those unfamiliar, are digital monitors that track how much we move every day. They give us better insight into our general health and encourage us to live better, more active lifestyles. Or so that’s the promise.
Do They Work?
I’ve only tested Nike’s FuelBand – and it’s being discontinued – but reviews of other activity trackers seem to all say the same thing. These devices don’t monitor your movement so much as they monitor their own. Meaning, if you wear an activity tracker on your wrist while drinking a beer, you’ll score more “points” from moving your arm than you would from doing push ups. It also only records movements, not exertion, so cleaning dishes will score you more points than completing a set of deadlifts. Some devices have workarounds for this, but the solutions are far from ideal.
So, the metrics these things produce aren’t completely accurate, but they are useful for helping you get a sense of how active you are from one day to another. They’re also great if you, like me, get most of your exercise from running (rather than bicycling, weightlifting, or yoga), and often need a bit of a push to get yourself off of the couch. There have been many occasions when I went out for an extra run just so I could meet my day’s activities goals. When you meet them, your tracker flashes pretty lights and gives you a little congratulatory message. It sounds silly, but people play video games for hours for similar rewards.
Our site is mostly about men’s clothing and style, but exercise intersects with these things in obvious ways. If you’re looking to be a bit more fit or active, and often feel you just need a bit of a push, consider getting an activity tracker. Their novelty, admittedly, wanes after six months or so, but they don’t need to be useful for a lifetime to be helpful. They only need to be useful enough to help us set good habits. 
Other Models 
FitBit and Jawbone are perhaps the most popular models right now, and both will allow you to do things that Nike’s FuelBand won’t (such as tracking food intake and sleep patterns). You may also want to check out these new or upcoming releases:
Razer Nabu and Samsung Gear Fit: Smart watch capabilities built into fitness bands. Along with being an activity tracker, you can receive instant notifications and text messages.  
Sony Smart Band: Instead of just tracking your activity levels, it also tracks how much time you’ve spent on the internet, reading books, hanging out with friends, or listening to music. Think of it as a “lifestyle monitor.”
Garmin’s VivoFit: Tracks how far and how quickly you’ve moved, which might be useful for runners. It also adjusts your new day’s goals according to your previous days’ activities, rather than requiring you to manually set goals yourself. Best of all, it supposedly can distinguish between when you’re actually running and when you’re just shaking your wrist, which is my main complaint with Nike’s Fuelband. 
Withings Acivite: A tracker built into a nice looking watch. Probably the most stylistically pleasing of all the models on this list. 
Moov, Kreyos, iFit, and Notch: Monitors that you can put on different parts of your body (or even on things such as your bike or golf clubs), which can give you more information on your activity levels. Best part is: if you wear a coat and tie often, having a monitor hidden somewhere else can be useful when activity trackers won’t fit underneath a tailored shirt cuff.  
Lumo Lift: A multi-locational activity tracker that will tell you when you’re slouching. Does the job that your mom used to do.
Atlas and Amiigo: Workout trackers. Can tell the difference between bicep curls and alternating bicep curls, as well as what kind of swim stroke you’re doing and what lap you’re on.
Apple: The most anticipated of all releases. There are a lot rumors right now on what features Apple’s “iWatch” might include, but it looks like we won’t know for sure until next year. 
(Photo via CNET)

Activity Trackers and Wearable Technology

I’m late to the whole activity tracker thing, but when Nike offloaded a bunch of FuelBands on Gilt earlier this year, I picked one up in the hopes of seeing how well they work. Activity trackers, for those unfamiliar, are digital monitors that track how much we move every day. They give us better insight into our general health and encourage us to live better, more active lifestyles. Or so that’s the promise.

Do They Work?

I’ve only tested Nike’s FuelBand – and it’s being discontinued – but reviews of other activity trackers seem to all say the same thing. These devices don’t monitor your movement so much as they monitor their own. Meaning, if you wear an activity tracker on your wrist while drinking a beer, you’ll score more “points” from moving your arm than you would from doing push ups. It also only records movements, not exertion, so cleaning dishes will score you more points than completing a set of deadlifts. Some devices have workarounds for this, but the solutions are far from ideal.

So, the metrics these things produce aren’t completely accurate, but they are useful for helping you get a sense of how active you are from one day to another. They’re also great if you, like me, get most of your exercise from running (rather than bicycling, weightlifting, or yoga), and often need a bit of a push to get yourself off of the couch. There have been many occasions when I went out for an extra run just so I could meet my day’s activities goals. When you meet them, your tracker flashes pretty lights and gives you a little congratulatory message. It sounds silly, but people play video games for hours for similar rewards.

Our site is mostly about men’s clothing and style, but exercise intersects with these things in obvious ways. If you’re looking to be a bit more fit or active, and often feel you just need a bit of a push, consider getting an activity tracker. Their novelty, admittedly, wanes after six months or so, but they don’t need to be useful for a lifetime to be helpful. They only need to be useful enough to help us set good habits. 

Other Models 

FitBit and Jawbone are perhaps the most popular models right now, and both will allow you to do things that Nike’s FuelBand won’t (such as tracking food intake and sleep patterns). You may also want to check out these new or upcoming releases:

  • Razer Nabu and Samsung Gear Fit: Smart watch capabilities built into fitness bands. Along with being an activity tracker, you can receive instant notifications and text messages.  
  • Sony Smart Band: Instead of just tracking your activity levels, it also tracks how much time you’ve spent on the internet, reading books, hanging out with friends, or listening to music. Think of it as a “lifestyle monitor.”
  • Garmin’s VivoFit: Tracks how far and how quickly you’ve moved, which might be useful for runners. It also adjusts your new day’s goals according to your previous days’ activities, rather than requiring you to manually set goals yourself. Best of all, it supposedly can distinguish between when you’re actually running and when you’re just shaking your wrist, which is my main complaint with Nike’s Fuelband. 
  • Withings Acivite: A tracker built into a nice looking watch. Probably the most stylistically pleasing of all the models on this list. 
  • Moov, Kreyos, iFit, and Notch: Monitors that you can put on different parts of your body (or even on things such as your bike or golf clubs), which can give you more information on your activity levels. Best part is: if you wear a coat and tie often, having a monitor hidden somewhere else can be useful when activity trackers won’t fit underneath a tailored shirt cuff.  
  • Lumo Lift: A multi-locational activity tracker that will tell you when you’re slouching. Does the job that your mom used to do.
  • Atlas and Amiigo: Workout trackers. Can tell the difference between bicep curls and alternating bicep curls, as well as what kind of swim stroke you’re doing and what lap you’re on.
  • Apple: The most anticipated of all releases. There are a lot rumors right now on what features Apple’s “iWatch” might include, but it looks like we won’t know for sure until next year

(Photo via CNET)

“…some kids have a hard time in high school… and they need clothes to act as a force field around them, either to set themselves apart or to join the goofballs, the Jay Z fans, the Star Wars nerds. I was never that unhappy, never an actual weird kid who needed armor. Whenever I tried joining a cohort with my clothing, it was trouble that led nowhere, neither placing me in a new peer group nor throwing me out of the village. I was missing that psychotic teenage flair and the upkeep was too much, so eventually I’d run out of steam and wear a combination of minimalist Christmas gifts, hand-me-downs from Dad (the most stylish category), and the few clothes my summer salary afforded me.
I came close to finding my cohort when hiphop was just beginning to kick in. I started wearing jeans, mesh hats, and black referee sneakers with fat red laces. That lasted for a little while. But it was only in the last five years, as an adult, that I realized that I could wear tailored clothing with good boots and look like I resembled my own thoughts. I’d basically been waiting to be a grown-up, for a moment when my clothes weren’t just a mute default position.”

Sasha Frere-Jones, Worn Stories.

-Pete

What Is the Put This On Inside Track?
Once a week here at Put This On, we post a special newsletter. The Inside Track features a roundup of recommended eBay items, hot sales and other tips to save you money on clothes.
Of course, we sometimes post sales notices here, and we post eBay lists publicly as well, but there’s a big difference. You may have noticed that when we post stuff here, our very large readership means it’s often gone in short order - or if it’s an eBay item, there’s stiff competition. A post on our site goes to about a thousand people for every one who sees it in our paid newsletter. That means much less competition - and savings for you.
The Inside Track costs less than five bucks a month. That means if you buy one or two items from our eBay lists or using one of our sale codes over the course of a year, you’ve saved money. And best of all, it keeps the lights on here at PTO, and supports our tough editorial policies.
Sign up for the Inside Track and start saving today.

What Is the Put This On Inside Track?

Once a week here at Put This On, we post a special newsletter. The Inside Track features a roundup of recommended eBay items, hot sales and other tips to save you money on clothes.

Of course, we sometimes post sales notices here, and we post eBay lists publicly as well, but there’s a big difference. You may have noticed that when we post stuff here, our very large readership means it’s often gone in short order - or if it’s an eBay item, there’s stiff competition. A post on our site goes to about a thousand people for every one who sees it in our paid newsletter. That means much less competition - and savings for you.

The Inside Track costs less than five bucks a month. That means if you buy one or two items from our eBay lists or using one of our sale codes over the course of a year, you’ve saved money. And best of all, it keeps the lights on here at PTO, and supports our tough editorial policies.

Sign up for the Inside Track and start saving today.

Nick Offerman at the Largo!

For those of you who are fans of Nick Offerman, the wonderful star of NBC’s wonderful Parks & Recreation, I’ll be hosting a conversation with him at Largo in Los Angeles next month. Tickets are on sale now.

If you’re not in LA, you can check out my interview with Nick on my public radio program Bullseye, here.

rarebirdlit:

image

Don’t miss Nick Offerman in conversation with Jesse Thorn on Sunday, September 14th. Nick & Jesse will be discussing Nick’s upcoming book Paddle Your Own Canoe: One Man’s Fundamentals for Delicious Living. Each ticket will receive a paperback copy of Nick’s book.

Seat assignments begin at 6:00PM, Doors open for drinks at 7:00PM, Showtime at 8:30PM.

Tickets available at: Largo at the Coronet

Sunday, September 14, 2014
7:00pm – 10:00pm

366 N La Cienega Blvd
Los Angeles, CA, 90048

Put This On’s Inside Track for the week of August 24th - August 30th

Here are our hand-selected favorites from eBay for this week, plus heads-up on recommended sales. If you’re a member of the Inside Track, click through, and log in with your Member.ly username and password. If you’re not a member, you can join now for just $5 a month - you’ll get access to one of these members-only lists every week, and your membership supports Put This On. 

See the rest →

eBay Roundup
Our thanks to the RJcat for helping us put together today’s roundup. If you’d like to find more menswear related auctions on eBay, try using our customized search links. They’ll help you quickly narrow in on high-end suits, good suits, high-quality shirts and fine footwear. 
Suits, sport coats, and blazers

Navy suit, 39
Blue Camps de Luca sport coat, 40
Navy sport coat, 40
Brown windowpane tweed, 40
Brown tweed, 40
Black and red houndstooth check sport coat, 40
Linen sport coat, 40
Tan sport coat, 42
Brown herringbone silk/ linen sport coat, 42
J. Press Harris Tweed sport coat, 42
Tuxedo, 42L
Grey pinstriped suit, 43
Grey herringbone tweed, 44

Outerwear

Parkas, various sizes
Mister Freedom ranch jacket, 36
Peacoat, 38
Orange hopsack shirt jacket, M
Zip up madras jacket, M
Trench coat, 42
Loden coat, 42
Smoking jacket, L
Black leather jacket, XL
Yellow Arnys jacket, 46

Sweaters and knits


Tan v-neck, 38
Vintage blue sweatshirt, XL


Shirts and pants


Safari shirt, XS
Green checked shirt, 15
Graph check shirt, S
Madras shirt, M
Washed denim shirt, L
Levis 1947 501s, 30
Studio D’Artisan jeans, 31
Brown trousers, 34
Navy trousers, 36
Incotex chinos (36, 38)
Red moleskins, 42 (LAMFRT)


Shoes

Loake brick soled bucks, various sizes
Carmina split toe bluchers, 6.5
Lodger wholecuts, 6.5
Lodger penny loafers, 8
Edward Green punch cap bluchers, 9
Yuketen suede ripple sole bluchers, 10
Brooks Brothers slippers, 11
Vintage spectators, 11 D
Carmina suede Chelsea boots, 11.5
Carmina tassel loafers, 11.5
Cole Haan lizard skin penny loafers, 11.5
Carmina split toe bluchers, 12.5 (pictured above)
Carmina shortwings, 13
Edward Green tassel loafers, 13
Carmina brogues, 13

Ties


Navy knit tie
Red floral tie
Black knit tie
Gold bi-color knit tie
Pink tie
Yellow grenadine
Black watch striped tie
Diamond motif ties (red, blue, navy, brown)


Bags, briefcases, and wallets

Canvas holdall

Misc.
RRL belt, 38
"No Alcohol or Confined Air" poster
Straw hat, 7 3/8
Ballcap, 7
Pocket squares (1, 2, 3)
Blue floral women’s scarf
Tattersall vest, 46
Pocket knife
Fog horn
Dressing gown, M
Blankets (1, 2)
Talarico umbrella
Trouser hangers
If you want access to an extra roundup every week, exclusive to members, join Put This On’s Inside Track for just five bucks a month.

eBay Roundup

Our thanks to the RJcat for helping us put together today’s roundup. If you’d like to find more menswear related auctions on eBay, try using our customized search links. They’ll help you quickly narrow in on high-end suitsgood suitshigh-quality shirts and fine footwear

Suits, sport coats, and blazers
Outerwear
Sweaters and knits
Shirts and pants
Shoes
Ties
Bags, briefcases, and wallets
Misc.

If you want access to an extra roundup every week, exclusive to members, join Put This On’s Inside Track for just five bucks a month.

Dallas Penn on his high school wardrobe:

"…how could I forgot how hard Avirex was when it first came out? This Avirex varsity jacket put in hella work for me. Steven Spielberg produced a TV show titled Amazing Stories and in this episode all the actors were wearing shearling flight jackets. I murdered the game by buying patches from an army navy store and having them sewn onto my coat. My custom game been crazy since the 1980s.

Read more at Complex.
-Pete

Dallas Penn on his high school wardrobe:

"…how could I forgot how hard Avirex was when it first came out? This Avirex varsity jacket put in hella work for me. Steven Spielberg produced a TV show titled Amazing Stories and in this episode all the actors were wearing shearling flight jackets. I murdered the game by buying patches from an army navy store and having them sewn onto my coat. My custom game been crazy since the 1980s.

Read more at Complex.

-Pete

The Beginning of the End of Government Suits?

Despite my advice in yesterday’s post, sometimes you can wear whatever the hell you want to a job interview. Wired calls attention to a the White House’s attempt to recruit IT talent to its new U.S. Digital Service—a project led by ex-Google engineer Mikey Dickerson. A point this video returns to over and over is the government’s accommodation of coders’ traditionally lax dress code: Dickerson seems to favor nondescript, untucked cotton button downs and khakis, while most of the President’s men are all suit all the time. In one segment Dickerson is wearing a jacket and tie—he jokes that it’s only because the President is in the room; Dickerson’s dress shirt appears to be made of denim.

The often-stereotyped uniform of the computer programmer/IT guy/coder is really the politician’s “can’t look like I care too much” uniform taken a step further: politicians won’t wear clothes that might be perceived as flashy because they could signify vanity, conspicuous wealth, or a lack of seriousness. They want you to know they have more important things to worry about. The Silicon Valley aesthetic’s rejection of, uh, aesthetics is more about, as Jesse put it, creating the facade of meritocracy: “Whoever hacks best wins.” Politicians want the approval of everyone, or at least 51% of everyone, and enough people still believe that SERIOUS BUSINESS requires a suit and tie to justify them. Tech guys’ attitude is a rejection of needing any approval at all. “This is what I feel like wearing. You need me. Take it or leave it.”

The implication of the video is great: that the government is worried its missing the opportunity to hire the best people for the job because those people wouldn’t even consider taking a job where they’d have to wear a suit.

-Pete