Put This On’s Inside Track for the week of July 20th - July 26th

Here are our hand-selected favorites from eBay for this week, plus heads-up on recommended sales. If you’re a member of the Inside Track, click through, and log in with your Member.ly username and password. If you’re not a member, you can join now for just $5 a month - you’ll get access to one of these members-only lists every week, and your membership supports Put This On. 

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eBay Roundup
Tons of great shell cordovan shoes in today’s roundup, including these from Ralph Lauren. Also, some agricultural memo books in the miscellanea section, and a spy camera!
As usual, if you don’t see anything you like here, you can also use our customized search links to find more menswear related auctions. We’ve made them for high-end suits, good suits, high-quality shirts and fine footwear. 
Suits, sport coats, and blazers

Pinstriped suits, 40 (charcoal, navy)
Charcoal suits, 40
Navy sport coat, 40
Brown windowpane sport coat, 40L
Brown checked sport coat, 44
Navy sport coat, 44L

Outerwear

Patrik Ervell black rubberized bomber, S
Green raincoat, 38
Belstaff Trialmaster, S
Quilted Belstaff jackets, S (1, 2, )
Belstaff Bedale, S
Real McCoys tanker jacket, M
Real McCoys deck jacket, 42
Wool mac coat, 42
Safari vest, L
Engineered Garments duffle coat, XL
Barbour fishing jacket, XXL

Sweaters and knits

Breton shirt, S
Cable knit shawl collar sweater, S
Navy cardigan, S
White sweatshirt, M

Shirts and pants

Blue herringbone shirt, S
Lee popover, M
Engineered Garments madras shirt, L
Jay Kos pants, various sizes
Roy jeans, 30
Steven Alan chinos, 31
Kapital jeans, 31
Charcoal wool trousers, 36
Kapital jeans, 38

Shoes

Ralph Lauren shoes, various sizes
Alden shell cordovan cap toe boots, 6.5
Common Projects high tops, 7
Brooks Brothers shell cordovan penny loafers, 8
Allen Edmonds cap toe oxfords, 8.5
Brooks Brothers shell cordovan penny loafers, 8.5
Ralph Lauren quarter brogues, 8.5 (pictured above)
Tricker’s plain toe bluchers, 8.5
APC plain toe boots, 9
Crockett & Jones tassel loafers, 9
Russell Moccasin boots, 9
Wolverine shell cordovan work boots, 9.5
Margiela GATs, 10
Alden suede Indy boots, 10.5
John Lobb suede plain toe bluchers, 10.5
Ralph Lauren shell cordovan penny loafers, 10.5
Viberg suede plain toe boots, 10.5
Allen Edmonds shell cordovan wingtip boots, 11
Common Projects Achilles Lows, 11
Quoddy Maliseets, 11
Allen Edmonds shell cordovan tassel loafers, 12A
Crockett & Jones plain toe oxfords, 12
Quoddy shearling-lined moc toe boots, 12

Ties
Holland & Holland knit tie
Jay Kos ties
Navy paisley tie
Green striped grenadine
Striped raw silk tie
Red striped tie
Navy Drake’s tie
Green floral tie (1, 2)
E. Marinella navy jacquard ties
Solid green tie
Striped brown tie
Striped blue tie
Light blue striped tie
Navy cashmere tie
Blue grenadine
Red Charvet tie

Bags, briefcases, and wallets

RRL wallet

Misc.

Jay Kos socks
Agricultural memo books (1, 2, 3, 4)
Ralph Lauren paisley pocket square
Traveling cigar case
Spy camera!
Braces
Dressing gown, XL
Surcingle belt, 32
Lizard skin belt, 36

If you want access to an extra roundup every week, exclusive to members, join Put This On’s Inside Track for just five bucks a month.

eBay Roundup

Tons of great shell cordovan shoes in today’s roundup, including these from Ralph Lauren. Also, some agricultural memo books in the miscellanea section, and a spy camera!

As usual, if you don’t see anything you like here, you can also use our customized search links to find more menswear related auctions. We’ve made them for high-end suitsgood suitshigh-quality shirts and fine footwear

Suits, sport coats, and blazers
Outerwear
Sweaters and knits
Shirts and pants
Shoes
Ties
Bags, briefcases, and wallets
Misc.
If you want access to an extra roundup every week, exclusive to members, join Put This On’s Inside Track for just five bucks a month.

It’s On Sale: Select Items at Sid Mashburn

Sid Mashburn’s sale just started. Discounts aren’t that deep, but the products are nice. Somethings that caught my eye: 

It’s On Sale: Eastland Made-in-Maine Moccasins 
For some reason, Eastland’s Made-in-Maine line has never really caught on with the menswear crowd. I’ve never really been sure why, given the popularity of similar brands such as Rancourt and Quoddy, but the shoes are great for their niche — Made-in-Maine moccasin construction, with leathers that are more often than not from Horween. There’s some stuff one can nitpick about the quality, but they’re all-in-all a pretty good purchase once they go on sale. 
On the upside, their under-the-radar presence means that they often get discounted much more than other brands. Like now, at East Dane, where the brand’s Falmouth mocs can be had for $124. Pretty good price for what I think is a nice casual shoe. 
East Dane has also other shoes from Eastland Made-in-Maine and Quoddy you can check out. 

It’s On Sale: Eastland Made-in-Maine Moccasins 

For some reason, Eastland’s Made-in-Maine line has never really caught on with the menswear crowd. I’ve never really been sure why, given the popularity of similar brands such as Rancourt and Quoddy, but the shoes are great for their niche — Made-in-Maine moccasin construction, with leathers that are more often than not from Horween. There’s some stuff one can nitpick about the quality, but they’re all-in-all a pretty good purchase once they go on sale. 

On the upside, their under-the-radar presence means that they often get discounted much more than other brands. Like now, at East Dane, where the brand’s Falmouth mocs can be had for $124. Pretty good price for what I think is a nice casual shoe. 

East Dane has also other shoes from Eastland Made-in-Maine and Quoddy you can check out

The Popover Shirt
Summer is a great time for slightly more casual takes on tailored clothing, and there’s no easier way to dress down a tailored jacket than by using a slightly more casual shirt. So instead of the finely woven cotton dress shirts you might use for the office, consider something in a linen or linen blend. Bolder patterns can also make a shirt look more casual, although you want to be wary of anything that looks too busy. I find blue and white Bengal stripes to be the most useful.
I’ve also come to really like popovers, which is a pullover style with a half placket front. Before sport shirts were made with coat fronts – where the opening went from the collar down to the hem, like a coat – they were made with half-plackets such as this button-down. Nowadays, popovers can be seen a sort of “in-between.” They’re more relaxed than a traditional shirt, but dressier than a polo, which makes them great for those days you want to look sharp, but casual.
The problem with popovers is that they can be sometimes hard to fit. Unlike long-sleeved polos or rugbys – which are styled similarly – these are constructed from a woven, rather than knitted, material. Which means they’re less stretchy. So, in order to easily slide in and out of these things, you want your shirt to be cut a little bigger, but not so big that it looks baggy when worn. 
I ended up going through my shirtmaker Ascot Chang in order to get the right fit, but you could also try many of the ready-to-wear options and be more exacting with your alterations tailor. Try Sid Mashburn, Gitman Brothers, J. Crew, G. Inglese, Individualized Shirts, Fun Time Shirt Company, and Ralph Lauren to start. For something custom, check out Mercer & Sons, Luxire, and our advertiser Proper Cloth. The first will do made-to-order, where you can customize your shirt from a wide range of pre-selected options, while the last two can do made-to-measure, where you’ll get a shirt made according to the body measurements you submit online.  

The Popover Shirt

Summer is a great time for slightly more casual takes on tailored clothing, and there’s no easier way to dress down a tailored jacket than by using a slightly more casual shirt. So instead of the finely woven cotton dress shirts you might use for the office, consider something in a linen or linen blend. Bolder patterns can also make a shirt look more casual, although you want to be wary of anything that looks too busy. I find blue and white Bengal stripes to be the most useful.

I’ve also come to really like popovers, which is a pullover style with a half placket front. Before sport shirts were made with coat fronts – where the opening went from the collar down to the hem, like a coat – they were made with half-plackets such as this button-down. Nowadays, popovers can be seen a sort of “in-between.” They’re more relaxed than a traditional shirt, but dressier than a polo, which makes them great for those days you want to look sharp, but casual.

The problem with popovers is that they can be sometimes hard to fit. Unlike long-sleeved polos or rugbys – which are styled similarly – these are constructed from a woven, rather than knitted, material. Which means they’re less stretchy. So, in order to easily slide in and out of these things, you want your shirt to be cut a little bigger, but not so big that it looks baggy when worn. 

I ended up going through my shirtmaker Ascot Chang in order to get the right fit, but you could also try many of the ready-to-wear options and be more exacting with your alterations tailor. Try Sid Mashburn, Gitman Brothers, J. Crew, G. Inglese, Individualized Shirts, Fun Time Shirt Company, and Ralph Lauren to start. For something custom, check out Mercer & Sons, Luxire, and our advertiser Proper Cloth. The first will do made-to-order, where you can customize your shirt from a wide range of pre-selected options, while the last two can do made-to-measure, where you’ll get a shirt made according to the body measurements you submit online.  

Real People: The Endurance of Prep

Prep style is a little like ska music (bear with me). Although it’s never really gone, every decade or so it creeps into the culture, and everybody’s into it, then, once it recedes back into the world of niche enthusiasts, we’re all a little embarrassed by how much we dug it. “That pink sweater/trombone? Yeah, it’s in the back of the closet.”

Prep influence has been ebbing in menswear for the last few years, largely in favor of more European references, but like good ska (if you’re willing to admit there is such a thing—I recommend Hepcat), good prep endures. Eric, who posts at Acute Style, does a fantastic job with clothing rooted in the prep tradition without descending into RL Rugby caricature (RIP) or fetishization. Blue blazers (3 roll 2), madras, repp ties, and seersucker; tassel loafers and classic Allen Edmonds oxfords (bit loafers, too; perhaps surprisingly, bit loafers made it into the original Preppy Handbook). Trousers are almost universally cotton, flat front, and cuffed. Eric wears his clothes a little trimmer than might be classically preppy, but the proportions are not overly cropped or boyish. I tend to roll my eyes a little at paeans to “timeless style,” but in my eyes, this is it. It’s enough to encourage me to break out some madras ties and a Skatalites record.

Maybe the best part is that Eric endeavors to build his wardrobe on a reasonable budget, reflecting some old school Yankee thrift. Vintage pieces, Uniqlo, L.L. Bean, and Lands End outnumber the pricier J. Press and Brooks Brothers pieces, for the most part, with accessories from upstarts like The Knottery and Cordial Churchman.

-Pete

Ralph Lauren’s homes apparently look like Ralph Lauren Home catalogs. 

Also, he has a horse in his driveway. 

More at Architectural Digest

(via FE Castleberry)

Real People: The Peak-Lapel, Single-Breasted Suit

Having peak lapels on a single-breasted jacket can be tricky. Without the longer lapel line of a double-breasted coat, a peak lapel can look unusually truncated – more like the stubby wings of a rotisserie chicken rather than the sweeping fins of a shark. 

Jeff in Louisville, however, shows how to do it well. The key is to get a jacket with a traditional buttoning point, where the center of a three-button coat, or top button on a two-button coat, sits at your waist. This gives the lapel its optimum length without making the bottom of your jacket look unnaturally short. A slightly wider lapel than what’s popular these days will also allow those peaks to express themselves. Jeff’s suit executes all this perfectly. 

Incidentally, almost everything Jeff is wearing above was thrifted:

  • Ralph Lauren Purple Label suit, thrifted for $50
  • Brooks Brothers Golden Fleece shirt, thrifted for $10
  • Robert Talbott Best of Class tie, thrifted for $5
  • No-name square, which was given to him as a gift
  • Johnston & Murphy Aritocraft shoes, thrifted for $12 

The thing about thrifting is that you often have to embrace the vintage look. It kind of comes with the territory. Jeff, however, somehow manages to always find pieces that fit perfectly (I assume after some alterations), and are styled in a classic and timeless way. Not only would you never know that his clothes were bought secondhand, but much of what he wears looks better than what’s sold as new in-stores today. You can check out more inspirational stuff from him at his blog The Thrifty Gent.

Our Beloved Sponsors

We like to check in with our sponsors twice a month to thank them for their support and see what’s going on with them. This month, we have four companies to appreciate. 

Our first sponsor, The Hanger Project, specializes in high-end wooden hangers, but they also sell much more. They have a range of garment care products, for example, including the two items pictured above. Men are typically advised to not dry clean their tailored clothes too often – and for good reason. Dry cleaners can be harsh on clothes. The brush you see above, then, is for brushing your clothes down after every wear, which will knock the dirt out of the fibers. The packet is for stain removal, with a special cleaning solution for each type of stain. Dry cleaners are supposed to treat your different stains differently, but not all do, which is why some can actually set in stains instead of remove them.

Our second sponsor Gustin crowdsources the production of their products and sells them direct to customers online, which allows them to undercut most of their competitors. Raw, selvedge denim jeans, for example, start at $89. They’re made in San Francisco from Cone Mills denim, just like the jeans you see retail for $150 and up. Yesterday, Gustin launched a new project – a denim where the warp is a natural plant dyed indigo, and the weft is kakishibu dyed (a traditional process of dyeing using fermented persimmon). The result is a fabric with a deep, dark indigo shade with a slight orange-brown cast. Being different from the blue/ white yarns that everyone else uses, these will fade more uniquely with time.

Our third sponsor is Chipp Neckwear – an American clothier with a ton of history. They used to be tailors for John F. Kennedy, and were one of the more famous institutions during the heyday of Ivy Style. Paul, the company’s proprietor, tells me that he’s working on some matka cloth ties. Matka is a handwoven silk from India. It’s sort of like raw silk in that it has a lot of texture, but it’s slightly airier and lighter, and woven in something that looks more like a sack weave. Paul hasn’t decided on a price yet, but – much like everything he sells – they’ll be lower any of his competitors. His grenadines, for example, are handmade in NYC from the same Italian cloth that everyone else uses, but run for $49.50 instead of ~$100-150.

Finally, we want to thank Proper Cloth for their support. They’re an online operation for custom made shirts, and they just got in some new Thomas Mason fabrics. 

 If you want to advertise on Put This On, just email us at contact@putthison.com.

Scientists Develop a Darker Black
Really dark black is apparently the new black. From The Independent:

A British company has produced a “strange, alien” material so black that it absorbs all but 0.035 per cent of visual light, setting a new world record. To stare at the “super black” coating made of carbon nanotubes – each 10,000 times thinner than a human hair – is an odd experience. It is so dark that the human eye cannot understand what it is seeing. Shapes and contours are lost, leaving nothing but an apparent abyss.
If it was used to make one of Chanel’s little black dresses, the wearer’s head and limbs might appear to float incorporeally around a dress-shaped hole.
Actual applications are more serious, enabling astronomical cameras, telescopes and infrared scanning systems to function more effectively. Then there are the military uses that the material’s maker, Surrey NanoSystems, is not allowed to discuss.

You can read the rest here. The obvious question is: how much more black can this be? And the answer is — none. None more black.

Scientists Develop a Darker Black

Really dark black is apparently the new black. From The Independent:

A British company has produced a “strange, alien” material so black that it absorbs all but 0.035 per cent of visual light, setting a new world record. To stare at the “super black” coating made of carbon nanotubes – each 10,000 times thinner than a human hair – is an odd experience. It is so dark that the human eye cannot understand what it is seeing. Shapes and contours are lost, leaving nothing but an apparent abyss.

If it was used to make one of Chanel’s little black dresses, the wearer’s head and limbs might appear to float incorporeally around a dress-shaped hole.

Actual applications are more serious, enabling astronomical cameras, telescopes and infrared scanning systems to function more effectively. Then there are the military uses that the material’s maker, Surrey NanoSystems, is not allowed to discuss.

You can read the rest here. The obvious question is: how much more black can this be? And the answer is — none. None more black.