Consider buying more than one
I hesitate to promote unnecessary purchases, but in a few cases I’ve been glad that I’ve bought more than just one of an article of clothing I really enjoyed. 
The thought occurred to me yesterday when I wore a long-sleeved white polo shirt I’d bought last summer at Suit Supply. It was the first time I’d been able to find such a shirt with arms and torso lengths that were long enough for me. The shirt was a bit pricey — probably around $100 — but I really liked the way it fit and knew I’d want to wear it quite a bit. I decided to buy two. 
At the time, I wondered if it was a smart idea. But last night I checked Suit Supply’s website, wondering if they had brought back the polo shirt in new colors. Sadly, I discovered they didn’t have any long-sleeve polo shirts available this season. Looking back, I’m glad I’d bought two, especially given how often I wear them. 
I’ve done this in the past with Brooks Brothers blue OCBDs, because of how much I like the fit, collar and fabric. I live with a mild fear that one day Brooks Brothers will change their construction or stop making them in a size that will fit me. It’s probably irrational, but it hasn’t kept me from thinking, “You should really buy a few more and put them in storage — just in case”. 
And I’m probably not the only one. I enjoyed reading this article in The New York Times about a year-and-a-half ago about how men shop in bulk. This comment from Paul Birardi was something I’ve thought before:

Recently I purchased washed chinos in different colors from J. Crew, mostly because whenever I find something that fits me properly, sure enough a designer will do away with that style the following season.

If you’re a hard size to fit off the rack and you finally found something that works perfectly for you, then consider buying two. Would I recommend doing this with all your clothing? Of course not. But I’m sure there are a few items in you wardrobe that you wouldn’t mind being able to have another of — long after it’s no longer being made or sold.
-Kiyoshi

Consider buying more than one

I hesitate to promote unnecessary purchases, but in a few cases I’ve been glad that I’ve bought more than just one of an article of clothing I really enjoyed. 

The thought occurred to me yesterday when I wore a long-sleeved white polo shirt I’d bought last summer at Suit Supply. It was the first time I’d been able to find such a shirt with arms and torso lengths that were long enough for me. The shirt was a bit pricey — probably around $100 — but I really liked the way it fit and knew I’d want to wear it quite a bit. I decided to buy two. 

At the time, I wondered if it was a smart idea. But last night I checked Suit Supply’s website, wondering if they had brought back the polo shirt in new colors. Sadly, I discovered they didn’t have any long-sleeve polo shirts available this season. Looking back, I’m glad I’d bought two, especially given how often I wear them. 

I’ve done this in the past with Brooks Brothers blue OCBDs, because of how much I like the fit, collar and fabric. I live with a mild fear that one day Brooks Brothers will change their construction or stop making them in a size that will fit me. It’s probably irrational, but it hasn’t kept me from thinking, “You should really buy a few more and put them in storage — just in case”. 

And I’m probably not the only one. I enjoyed reading this article in The New York Times about a year-and-a-half ago about how men shop in bulk. This comment from Paul Birardi was something I’ve thought before:

Recently I purchased washed chinos in different colors from J. Crew, mostly because whenever I find something that fits me properly, sure enough a designer will do away with that style the following season.

If you’re a hard size to fit off the rack and you finally found something that works perfectly for you, then consider buying two. Would I recommend doing this with all your clothing? Of course not. But I’m sure there are a few items in you wardrobe that you wouldn’t mind being able to have another of — long after it’s no longer being made or sold.

-Kiyoshi