The Importance of a Good Fit
Following Pete’s post on Panta, I thought I’d share this great photo of our friend Ed Morel. There are so many “rules” in classic men’s dress that sometimes it’s useful to be reminded which ones are important and which are not. The ones about how you should match your leathers, and how the width of your tie should match the width of your lapel, for example, can always be “ballparked,” as Ed’s done here.
What’s more important is that Ed has well-fitting, comfortable looking clothes. His sport coat is neither fashionably tight nor overly loose, and his pants are slim, but don’t make him look like one of those double-popsicle sticks. The patterned jacket also is adding a bit of visual interest to an ensemble that’s otherwise mostly relying on solid colors. Shoes are nice and shined, and the collar on his shirt is big enough so that the points stay hidden underneath his jacket. To be sure, there are some men who can pull off the “short collar” look, but I think most do better with something like what Ed has here (especially if they’re planning to wear a tie).
And although I still think charcoal trousers can only be worn with a limited number of jackets – typically certain tans and light grays – it looks like we can add Glenfeshie tweed to that list. Ed looks great here in his. 
(Photo via Well Worn Worn Well)

The Importance of a Good Fit

Following Pete’s post on Panta, I thought I’d share this great photo of our friend Ed Morel. There are so many “rules” in classic men’s dress that sometimes it’s useful to be reminded which ones are important and which are not. The ones about how you should match your leathers, and how the width of your tie should match the width of your lapel, for example, can always be “ballparked,” as Ed’s done here.

What’s more important is that Ed has well-fitting, comfortable looking clothes. His sport coat is neither fashionably tight nor overly loose, and his pants are slim, but don’t make him look like one of those double-popsicle sticks. The patterned jacket also is adding a bit of visual interest to an ensemble that’s otherwise mostly relying on solid colors. Shoes are nice and shined, and the collar on his shirt is big enough so that the points stay hidden underneath his jacket. To be sure, there are some men who can pull off the “short collar” look, but I think most do better with something like what Ed has here (especially if they’re planning to wear a tie).

And although I still think charcoal trousers can only be worn with a limited number of jackets – typically certain tans and light grays – it looks like we can add Glenfeshie tweed to that list. Ed looks great here in his. 

(Photo via Well Worn Worn Well)