Real People: Layering Knitwear
Layering is usually done simple enough: on top of an undershirt goes a long-sleeved woven shirt, then a sweater, then a jacket, and finally – if the weather is freezing – you can add a heavy coat. In the cool temperatures of early spring and late fall, however, you can make a more interesting look by just laying knitwear itself. The principle is the same: the layer closest to your skin should be lightweight, and then on top of that you can add something heavier.
Our own Pete from DC shows how this can be done well. The black sweater is a fisherman’s rollneck by SNS Herning, and the knitted jacket is by Engineered Garments. It’s hard to tell from the photo, but the rollneck is actually knitted with a bobble stitch, which creates a slightly textured surface. A bit like my post on boring outerwear, the use of texturally interesting fabrics here keeps things pleasing without the need to turn to patterns or odd design details. 
The jeans, if you’re wondering, are three-year old APCs, which are valued by many because they fade to that handsome sky blue you see above. The shoes were designed by Supreme in collaboration with Padmore & Barnes – the second of which was the original maker of Clarks’ Wallabees. Padmore & Barnes recently re-launched with a line of Irish made shoes. I admit I wanted to buy some of the boots just so I could say they “had to be, the best thing since my socks in Clarks Wallabees.”

Real People: Layering Knitwear

Layering is usually done simple enough: on top of an undershirt goes a long-sleeved woven shirt, then a sweater, then a jacket, and finally – if the weather is freezing – you can add a heavy coat. In the cool temperatures of early spring and late fall, however, you can make a more interesting look by just laying knitwear itself. The principle is the same: the layer closest to your skin should be lightweight, and then on top of that you can add something heavier.

Our own Pete from DC shows how this can be done well. The black sweater is a fisherman’s rollneck by SNS Herning, and the knitted jacket is by Engineered Garments. It’s hard to tell from the photo, but the rollneck is actually knitted with a bobble stitch, which creates a slightly textured surface. A bit like my post on boring outerwear, the use of texturally interesting fabrics here keeps things pleasing without the need to turn to patterns or odd design details. 

The jeans, if you’re wondering, are three-year old APCs, which are valued by many because they fade to that handsome sky blue you see above. The shoes were designed by Supreme in collaboration with Padmore & Barnes – the second of which was the original maker of Clarks’ Wallabees. Padmore & Barnes recently re-launched with a line of Irish made shoes. I admit I wanted to buy some of the boots just so I could say they “had to be, the best thing since my socks in Clarks Wallabees.”