What Olympic Ice Skating Looked Like in 1924
Pictured above: English speed skaters B. H. Sutton (left), L. H. Cambridgeshire (middle), and A. E. Tibbet (right) train in Chamonix, France for the Winter Olympic Games. 
(Photo via CrimsonSox)

What Olympic Ice Skating Looked Like in 1924

Pictured above: English speed skaters B. H. Sutton (left), L. H. Cambridgeshire (middle), and A. E. Tibbet (right) train in Chamonix, France for the Winter Olympic Games. 

(Photo via CrimsonSox)

EFFECTIVE suit style via The New Yorker's Currency blog, which recently highlighted ads targeting the high earners of the 1920s. For reference, $55 in 1926 is roughly equivalent to $725 in 2013, and Finchley was a well-regarded men’s shop in the same league as Brooks Brothers.
-Pete

EFFECTIVE suit style via The New Yorker's Currency blog, which recently highlighted ads targeting the high earners of the 1920s. For reference, $55 in 1926 is roughly equivalent to $725 in 2013, and Finchley was a well-regarded men’s shop in the same league as Brooks Brothers.

-Pete

I’ve just lost forty minutes in the photo gallery of the Martin & Osa Johnson Safari Museum. The Johnsons were a Kansas couple who adventured their way through the 1920s and 30s, making some of the first wildlife documentaries on film and photographing both people and animals. Their book was called “I Married Adventure.” Wonderful.

I’ll admit it: I do love a good safari outfit.

Via Kottke and nyer photo booth, bootleggers’ Cow Shoes:


A new method of evading prohibition agents was revealed here today by A.L. Allen, state prohibition enforcement director, who displayed what he called a “cow shoe” as the latest thing front the haunts of moonshiners.
The cow shoe is a strip of metal to which is tacked a wooden block carved to resemble the hoof of a cow, which may be strapped to the human foot. A man shod with a pair of them would leave a trail resembling that of a cow.
The shoe found was picked up near Port Tampa where a still was located some time ago. It will be sent to the prohibition department at Washington. Officers believe the inventor got his idea from a Sherlock Holmes story in which the villain shod his horse with shoes the imprint of which resembled those of a cow’s hoof.

Via Kottke and nyer photo booth, bootleggers’ Cow Shoes:

A new method of evading prohibition agents was revealed here today by A.L. Allen, state prohibition enforcement director, who displayed what he called a “cow shoe” as the latest thing front the haunts of moonshiners.

The cow shoe is a strip of metal to which is tacked a wooden block carved to resemble the hoof of a cow, which may be strapped to the human foot. A man shod with a pair of them would leave a trail resembling that of a cow.

The shoe found was picked up near Port Tampa where a still was located some time ago. It will be sent to the prohibition department at Washington. Officers believe the inventor got his idea from a Sherlock Holmes story in which the villain shod his horse with shoes the imprint of which resembled those of a cow’s hoof.

The mugshot of William Munro, 1924. That might just be a grenadine tie.
More wonderful photos here. Interesting (to me at least) that almost everyone’s tie is texturally rich. Texture in ties is underrated.
(thanks Ryan!)

The mugshot of William Munro, 1924. That might just be a grenadine tie.

More wonderful photos here. Interesting (to me at least) that almost everyone’s tie is texturally rich. Texture in ties is underrated.

(thanks Ryan!)

Buster Keaton in “College.”
Via Greensleeves to a Ground

Buster Keaton in “College.”

Via Greensleeves to a Ground