1977 Lincoln Continental Mark V, Bill Blass Edition
The Bill Blass brand is tarnished these days, but he helped establish American designer menswear, alongside contemporary Ralph Lauren, in the 1970s. This Lincoln, with 40,000 original miles, is a pretty slick deal for $9,500.

1977 Lincoln Continental Mark V, Bill Blass Edition

The Bill Blass brand is tarnished these days, but he helped establish American designer menswear, alongside contemporary Ralph Lauren, in the 1970s. This Lincoln, with 40,000 original miles, is a pretty slick deal for $9,500.

I’ve always wanted a Scout, but the plaid seats on this Scout II for sale on Hemmings blew my mind. Anybody got an extra $21,500 they wanna lend me?

This is a 1969 Fiat Shellette Michelotti. The wicker seats and dash were hand-woven by the same folks who made picnic baskets for Rolls Royce. I cannot imagine a finer ride to the beach. A bargain at $58,000.

This is a 1969 Fiat Shellette Michelotti. The wicker seats and dash were hand-woven by the same folks who made picnic baskets for Rolls Royce. I cannot imagine a finer ride to the beach. A bargain at $58,000.

A rare collection of the automotive mascots by Renee Lalique is going on auction, and the photographs on the Hemmings Motor News blog had me agog.

A rare collection of the automotive mascots by Renee Lalique is going on auction, and the photographs on the Hemmings Motor News blog had me agog.

Headphones for Listening
I’m in the audio business.
The media business, really - I’ve hosted on TV, I write here on PTO, I do web video - but the core of what I do for a living goes in your ears. As such, I’ve been vexed in recent years as I’ve seen more and more overpriced, overbranded headphones being sold to folks who simply don’t know any better. I care about how my headphones sound, especially when I’m listening to music, so I thought I’d offer a quick recommendation for folks who are looking for cans that will sound gorgeous at a decent price.
Grado Labs specializes in headphones. Unlike Beats Audio, they’re not the audio equivalent of a George Foreman grill. Unlike Sennheiser, they haven’t mass-marketed their once-quality products into extinction. Instead, they focus on making headphones with a simple aesthetic, a decent pricepoint, and exceptional sound.
As you can see above, they look like headphones. Classic headphones. They’re not comically oversized, and they don’t feature a goofy, futuristic logo that also advertises your favorite hip-hop producer and soft drink. They’re comfortable, and feature open construction, which means that you’ll be able to hear what’s going on around you in addition to your music. This is how your ears and brain were designed to process sound, and will improve your listening experience, not hinder it. Trust me.
They’re designed for the long-term, as well, with replaceable and repairable parts and a solid build quality that you simply don’t get from most consumer electronics these days.
The SR-60, their base model, sells for about $80. The SR-80, pictured above, sells for about a hundred bucks. Both are exceptional values, and will sound better than the $300 set you might buy from whatever Circuit City is called now. You know… the ones with the red “B” on the side. Of course, Grado has a whole range of options that go up from there for serious audiophiles, but the difference between what you’re listening to now and even their most basic model will be huge.
If you’re looking for something smaller and cheaper, there’s another old standby, the Koss Portapro. The aesthetics are less elegant, but for less than $40, you’ll get exceptional sound for the price, and from personal experience, Koss will replace them for you if they fail for almost any reason.
There’s nothing more inelegant than the wrong tool.

Headphones for Listening

I’m in the audio business.

The media business, really - I’ve hosted on TV, I write here on PTO, I do web video - but the core of what I do for a living goes in your ears. As such, I’ve been vexed in recent years as I’ve seen more and more overpriced, overbranded headphones being sold to folks who simply don’t know any better. I care about how my headphones sound, especially when I’m listening to music, so I thought I’d offer a quick recommendation for folks who are looking for cans that will sound gorgeous at a decent price.

Grado Labs specializes in headphones. Unlike Beats Audio, they’re not the audio equivalent of a George Foreman grill. Unlike Sennheiser, they haven’t mass-marketed their once-quality products into extinction. Instead, they focus on making headphones with a simple aesthetic, a decent pricepoint, and exceptional sound.

As you can see above, they look like headphones. Classic headphones. They’re not comically oversized, and they don’t feature a goofy, futuristic logo that also advertises your favorite hip-hop producer and soft drink. They’re comfortable, and feature open construction, which means that you’ll be able to hear what’s going on around you in addition to your music. This is how your ears and brain were designed to process sound, and will improve your listening experience, not hinder it. Trust me.

They’re designed for the long-term, as well, with replaceable and repairable parts and a solid build quality that you simply don’t get from most consumer electronics these days.

The SR-60, their base model, sells for about $80. The SR-80, pictured above, sells for about a hundred bucks. Both are exceptional values, and will sound better than the $300 set you might buy from whatever Circuit City is called now. You know… the ones with the red “B” on the side. Of course, Grado has a whole range of options that go up from there for serious audiophiles, but the difference between what you’re listening to now and even their most basic model will be huge.

If you’re looking for something smaller and cheaper, there’s another old standby, the Koss Portapro. The aesthetics are less elegant, but for less than $40, you’ll get exceptional sound for the price, and from personal experience, Koss will replace them for you if they fail for almost any reason.

There’s nothing more inelegant than the wrong tool.

Hella Bitters in NYC
Our second camera and editor, Benjamin Harrison, is also a cocktail master. His creation is a celebration of his two great loves (other than Put This On): cocktail bitters and the Bay Area. He’s joined them into a powerful brew called Hella Bitters.
Ben started Hella Bitters with a Kickstarter project that blew past his expectations, raising two and a half times what he asked for. Now, he’s going to retail with his wormwood and citrus bitters.
If you’re in New York, you can already grab Hella Bitters at Whisk in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. If you’re not, you can carry it in your retail outlet. It turns out that bitters is considered a condiment, not liquor, so you don’t need a liquor license to sell it. If you want to buy Hella Bitters wholesale, just get at us (contact@putthison.com) and we’ll connect you with Ben.
Remember: when you’re looking for bitters, look for the thizz face!

Hella Bitters in NYC

Our second camera and editor, Benjamin Harrison, is also a cocktail master. His creation is a celebration of his two great loves (other than Put This On): cocktail bitters and the Bay Area. He’s joined them into a powerful brew called Hella Bitters.

Ben started Hella Bitters with a Kickstarter project that blew past his expectations, raising two and a half times what he asked for. Now, he’s going to retail with his wormwood and citrus bitters.

If you’re in New York, you can already grab Hella Bitters at Whisk in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. If you’re not, you can carry it in your retail outlet. It turns out that bitters is considered a condiment, not liquor, so you don’t need a liquor license to sell it. If you want to buy Hella Bitters wholesale, just get at us (contact@putthison.com) and we’ll connect you with Ben.

Remember: when you’re looking for bitters, look for the thizz face!

How wonderful is this dinnerware designed for use on board the legendary passenger train the Superchief? I’m not a train guy, but when Jim Lehrer was on my show, I read his mystery novel Super, set on the Superchief. There’s something wonderful about the Deco combination of aesthetics and kineticism. The beauty of a machine built for transportation. Very inspiring.
(via Ancient Industries)

How wonderful is this dinnerware designed for use on board the legendary passenger train the Superchief? I’m not a train guy, but when Jim Lehrer was on my show, I read his mystery novel Super, set on the Superchief. There’s something wonderful about the Deco combination of aesthetics and kineticism. The beauty of a machine built for transportation. Very inspiring.

(via Ancient Industries)

One of the best parts of living in Southern California is the access to great flea markets almost every weekend of the month. First week of the month is Pasadena City College, third week is Long Beach, fourth week Santa Monica, plus Hollywood every weekend and the granddaddy of them all, the Rose Bowl Flea.

My favorite flea is the PCC, but the Rose Bowl is the biggest of the bunch. I headed out this morning looking for furniture for my new place, and ended up with a lovely coffee table, a big old California flag and a concrete bunny rabbit.

The Rose Bowl Flea is truly enormous, with a huge section selling swap meet crap, a huge antiques-and-collectibles area (where I bought my furniture) and the biggest vintage clothing area I’ve ever seen. The vintage clothing is very much geared towards women and Japanese dealers - you can find all sorts of militariana, work boots, vintage Patagonia fleeces and semi-ironic t-shirts but not a lot of tailored clothes.

I was there for the furniture, but I made sure to stop by and visit Sam, my favorite vendor, who always has a great selection of shoes. Because of the Japanese dealer factor, he often brings mostly small sizes, and I’m a 12, so I don’t frequently buy from Sam, but unlike most of the dealers, he’s a man of taste.

It’s a testament to the drawing power of the Rose Bowl that Sam and his colleague drive out every month from Atlanta, Georgia. I was hoping to plug his consignment shop, but he told me that his rent got hiked and he had to close it up and move to eBay. You can still catch him once a month in Pasadena and at Smiley’s Flea Market in Macon, Georgia.

Our camera man and editor Ben Harrison has been cooking up cocktail bitters for years, refining an amazing recipe. Now he’s kicking things up a notch with a Kickstarter project to make a Giant Vat’s worth. A twenty dollar pledge gets you a bottle of Hella Bitter Citrus Cocktail Bitters, featuring Ben offering his best thizz face on the label. Well worth a couple of sawbucks, says I.

Art Nouveau-influenced steamboat inkwell; starting bid $300, estimated $600-800.
via Dinosaurs & Robots

Art Nouveau-influenced steamboat inkwell; starting bid $300, estimated $600-800.

via Dinosaurs & Robots