Dead Men’s Patterns

Want to start your week with something morbid? Hormazd Narielwalla is an artist that makes collages from bespoke tailoring patterns of deceased Savile Row customers. As some readers know, when someone gets something made bespoke (whether it be a suit, shirt, or pair of shoes), a custom paper pattern has to be made according to his or her body. And from that pattern comes the tailor or shoemaker’s work. When the client dies, however, the pattern is often shredded, as there’s no longer any use for it. 

Narielwalla, however, has taken these patterns and given them new life by turning them into art. In this way, the pieces of the pattern - say, the sleeve or side panel of a suit jacket - just become abstracted shapes, divorced from the original person’s body. Above is just a selection of images from Narielwalla’s website. He also has a book called Dead Men’s Patterns, which you can read about here.

(via the RJcat)

Oh dang, Supreme. You just got ethered by legendary artist Barbara Kruger, from whom you stole much of your steez. Sucks to be you!
Always glad to get that email that I won an auction on eBay. Above: my new painting.

Always glad to get that email that I won an auction on eBay. Above: my new painting.

How about a counterbalance to the holiday buying frenzy, courtesy of Barbara Kruger and The New York Times? This piece is called “For Sale.”

How about a counterbalance to the holiday buying frenzy, courtesy of Barbara Kruger and The New York Times? This piece is called “For Sale.”

Barbara Kruger, 1984

Barbara Kruger, 1984

PTO Man: Ian Bruce

Excerpted from S2E3 of Put This On: “(New) Traditions”

Ian Bruce, painter and member of The Correspondents, on how an artist should dress, the tradition of the Soho Dandy.

My good friend (and colleague) Graham Clark paints with his beard for charity. So I guess I’m saying that if you’re in Vancouver, and you don’t go to his show, you’re a real so-and-so.

My good friend (and colleague) Graham Clark paints with his beard for charity. So I guess I’m saying that if you’re in Vancouver, and you don’t go to his show, you’re a real so-and-so.

The painter Adolf Konrad’s packing list, December 16th, 1973. From The Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art, via Salon.
(Thanks, Sara!)

The painter Adolf Konrad’s packing list, December 16th, 1973. From The Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art, via Salon.

(Thanks, Sara!)

beardpaintings:
My friend and colleague Graham Clark is a painter. Rather than using a brush, he uses his beard, which is attached to his lower face area, and quite large. He sells the paintings he paints to raise money for a friend’s cancer treatment.
So: follow him on Tumblr, so you can hear about future paintings. And enjoy the one above, inspired by the dress of one P.W. Herman.

beardpaintings:

My friend and colleague Graham Clark is a painter. Rather than using a brush, he uses his beard, which is attached to his lower face area, and quite large. He sells the paintings he paints to raise money for a friend’s cancer treatment.

So: follow him on Tumblr, so you can hear about future paintings. And enjoy the one above, inspired by the dress of one P.W. Herman.

(Source: beardpaintings)

Many people have emailed me over the past few months to ask about the painting of two snails which can be seen in my dining room as I demonstrate shoe shine technique in Episode Two of PTO.
It was painted in the 1960s by a close friend of my mother’s named Annie Truxell. We had several of Annie’s paintings in the house, and when my mom offered to let me steal a painting from her, the one on my wall is the one I chose.
My mother just emailed me Annie’s new website - she’s getting older (as we all are) but very much alive and working. Click through and take a look at some of her beautiful and mind-bending work.

Many people have emailed me over the past few months to ask about the painting of two snails which can be seen in my dining room as I demonstrate shoe shine technique in Episode Two of PTO.

It was painted in the 1960s by a close friend of my mother’s named Annie Truxell. We had several of Annie’s paintings in the house, and when my mom offered to let me steal a painting from her, the one on my wall is the one I chose.

My mother just emailed me Annie’s new website - she’s getting older (as we all are) but very much alive and working. Click through and take a look at some of her beautiful and mind-bending work.