Many people have emailed me over the past few months to ask about the painting of two snails which can be seen in my dining room as I demonstrate shoe shine technique in Episode Two of PTO.
It was painted in the 1960s by a close friend of my mother’s named Annie Truxell. We had several of Annie’s paintings in the house, and when my mom offered to let me steal a painting from her, the one on my wall is the one I chose.
My mother just emailed me Annie’s new website - she’s getting older (as we all are) but very much alive and working. Click through and take a look at some of her beautiful and mind-bending work.

Many people have emailed me over the past few months to ask about the painting of two snails which can be seen in my dining room as I demonstrate shoe shine technique in Episode Two of PTO.

It was painted in the 1960s by a close friend of my mother’s named Annie Truxell. We had several of Annie’s paintings in the house, and when my mom offered to let me steal a painting from her, the one on my wall is the one I chose.

My mother just emailed me Annie’s new website - she’s getting older (as we all are) but very much alive and working. Click through and take a look at some of her beautiful and mind-bending work.

The Sea Nymph, by Josh Beckman.  Opens tonight at The Machine Project in Los Angeles.
For a period of five weeks Josh Beckman’s Sea Nymph will be host to a whole series of nautical-themed events, performances,  lectures, and workshops, as well as an opera by and for dogs.

The Sea Nymph, by Josh Beckman.  Opens tonight at The Machine Project in Los Angeles.

For a period of five weeks Josh Beckman’s Sea Nymph will be host to a whole series of nautical-themed events, performances, lectures, and workshops, as well as an opera by and for dogs.

For my money, there’s no more beautiful wristwatch than those designed by Max Bill for Junghans in the middle of the 20th century.  Bill was a legendary designer, fine artist and teacher at the Bauhaus, possibly Switzerland’s greatest artist.  His watches reflect his clean early modern design — he believed mathematics could be a path to aesthetics.  They can be tough to find in the US, though they are sold at the Museum of Modern Art store.