Do I Really Have Ten Blue Blazers?
This morning, I’m spending a bit of time switching cold weather clothes for warm weather clothes. It’s a time of reckoning. And I reckon I’ve got a lot of blue blazers.
To my credit, I’ve only purchased one of them new, and most came from thrift shops. And what they say about blazers, that they’re the most versatile garment you can own, is true. But still… ten?
Here’s the rundown:
Classic Brooks Brothers. This is the blazer you think of when you think of a blazer. Brass buttons, the whole nine. Bought it at the thrift shop, and I rarely wear it… I’m not a brass button guy.
Classic Brooks Brothers (White Buttons). Another thrift store find - but I replaced the brass buttons with mother-of-pearl.
Kiton Double-Breasted. This one’s all cashmere. I bought it at a thrift store, and I think it may at one time have been the jacket of a suit. Since it’s so soft and unconstructed, and Italianate in style, it works great as a blazer. Replaced the buttons with light horn ones.
Chester Barrie Double-Breasted. I bought this one for $75 or something on eBay a week before I found the Kiton at the thrift. Put smoke mother-of-pearl buttons on it. It’s a little lighter than the Kiton, so it gets more warm-weather wear.
Polo Corduroy. This one gets out a lot when it’s cooler - and it was $30 or so on eBay.
Brooks Brothers Unconstructed Flannel. This one I found at a thrift store in Orange County. It fit perfectly off the rack, and one of the best-dressed guys I know, Elvis Mitchell, once told me it was gorgeous. Has brown horn buttons. Great for knocking around in cool weather.
Cantarelli Summer-Weight . This one’s very blogger approved - patch pockets all around, partial lining, open-weave wool. Got it from eBay for $50 or so. Couldn’t resist.
Custom Fresco Blazer. This was my first ever bespoke garment, from High Society Tailor in Los Angeles. It’s something prohibitively expensive off the rack that, living in LA, I wear all the time.
Vintage Flecked Blazer. This one’s from the late 50s, maybe the early 60s. I bought it at a thrift many years ago, and it’s a great going-out coat. Add a knit tie, a button-down shirt and grey flannels and you look like the big man on campus.
Freeman’s Sporting Club Shacket. Is this a blazer? Or a shirt? Or a shirt-jacket? It’s solid navy, so I’m calling it a blazer. A perfect thing to throw in the bag for a casual trip. Warm, fits a sweater underneath, looks great with jeans and chinos. Another $50-ish eBay purchase.
So what does it all mean? Am I a crazy person? Or do I just have the right tool for every job? Maybe the latter. Maybe the former.
(Edit: just took out my summer clothes. Blue Polo linen. That’s eleven.)

Do I Really Have Ten Blue Blazers?

This morning, I’m spending a bit of time switching cold weather clothes for warm weather clothes. It’s a time of reckoning. And I reckon I’ve got a lot of blue blazers.

To my credit, I’ve only purchased one of them new, and most came from thrift shops. And what they say about blazers, that they’re the most versatile garment you can own, is true. But still… ten?

Here’s the rundown:

  1. Classic Brooks Brothers. This is the blazer you think of when you think of a blazer. Brass buttons, the whole nine. Bought it at the thrift shop, and I rarely wear it… I’m not a brass button guy.
  2. Classic Brooks Brothers (White Buttons). Another thrift store find - but I replaced the brass buttons with mother-of-pearl.
  3. Kiton Double-Breasted. This one’s all cashmere. I bought it at a thrift store, and I think it may at one time have been the jacket of a suit. Since it’s so soft and unconstructed, and Italianate in style, it works great as a blazer. Replaced the buttons with light horn ones.
  4. Chester Barrie Double-Breasted. I bought this one for $75 or something on eBay a week before I found the Kiton at the thrift. Put smoke mother-of-pearl buttons on it. It’s a little lighter than the Kiton, so it gets more warm-weather wear.
  5. Polo Corduroy. This one gets out a lot when it’s cooler - and it was $30 or so on eBay.
  6. Brooks Brothers Unconstructed Flannel. This one I found at a thrift store in Orange County. It fit perfectly off the rack, and one of the best-dressed guys I know, Elvis Mitchell, once told me it was gorgeous. Has brown horn buttons. Great for knocking around in cool weather.
  7. Cantarelli Summer-Weight . This one’s very blogger approved - patch pockets all around, partial lining, open-weave wool. Got it from eBay for $50 or so. Couldn’t resist.
  8. Custom Fresco Blazer. This was my first ever bespoke garment, from High Society Tailor in Los Angeles. It’s something prohibitively expensive off the rack that, living in LA, I wear all the time.
  9. Vintage Flecked Blazer. This one’s from the late 50s, maybe the early 60s. I bought it at a thrift many years ago, and it’s a great going-out coat. Add a knit tie, a button-down shirt and grey flannels and you look like the big man on campus.
  10. Freeman’s Sporting Club Shacket. Is this a blazer? Or a shirt? Or a shirt-jacket? It’s solid navy, so I’m calling it a blazer. A perfect thing to throw in the bag for a casual trip. Warm, fits a sweater underneath, looks great with jeans and chinos. Another $50-ish eBay purchase.

So what does it all mean? Am I a crazy person? Or do I just have the right tool for every job? Maybe the latter. Maybe the former.

(Edit: just took out my summer clothes. Blue Polo linen. That’s eleven.)

abitofcolor:

Blazer Buttons - Classics found at Cable Car Clothiers San Francisco. 

There are a million choices when it comes to blazer buttons - try searching for blazer button sets on eBay, visiting a great fabric and notions store, stopping into a trad store like Cable Car Clothiers, or looking online somewhere like Hwa Seng. The actual replacement of the buttons won’t cost you more than ten or fifteen dollars, and the possibilities are endless.

abitofcolor:

Blazer Buttons - Classics found at Cable Car Clothiers San Francisco. 

There are a million choices when it comes to blazer buttons - try searching for blazer button sets on eBay, visiting a great fabric and notions store, stopping into a trad store like Cable Car Clothiers, or looking online somewhere like Hwa Seng. The actual replacement of the buttons won’t cost you more than ten or fifteen dollars, and the possibilities are endless.

It’s On eBay
Brunello Cucinelli Cotton Blazer
Starts at .99, ends February 13th

It’s On eBay

Brunello Cucinelli Cotton Blazer

Starts at .99, ends February 13th

mostexerent:

Forgot that I had my navy DB.. Sheesh it was 28c & only 0800 when this was taken.
Details: Jacket (part of suit) - Bespoke 8.5 oz Fresco (same as grey suit I had on last week), Shirt - Bespoke, Pantaloons (part of suit) - Bespoke 8.5 oz Fresco, PS - vintage Japanese silk, Shoes - black “Belgrave” Crockett & Jones.

That’s 82F at 8AM, and our man MistahWong looks clean as the Board of Health. Living somewhere warm is no excuse for dressing like a slob.

mostexerent:

Forgot that I had my navy DB.. Sheesh it was 28c & only 0800 when this was taken.

Details: Jacket (part of suit) - Bespoke 8.5 oz Fresco (same as grey suit I had on last week), Shirt - Bespoke, Pantaloons (part of suit) - Bespoke 8.5 oz Fresco, PS - vintage Japanese silk, Shoes - black “Belgrave” Crockett & Jones.

That’s 82F at 8AM, and our man MistahWong looks clean as the Board of Health. Living somewhere warm is no excuse for dressing like a slob.

(via howtotalktogirlsatparties)

Do As I Say, Not As I Do

inpicturesandwords:

Another display of great Italian fashion. Maybe it’s Lapo Elkann, or maybe it’s just that being Italian ultimately correlates to amazing style. 

We don’t do a lot of what not to do here, but this is a great example of what not to do.

Here’s a guy photographed at Pitti Uomo, the huge menswear expo in Italy.  He should know what he’s doing.  He’s certainly on-trend, as they say in the magazines, with his white pants and double-breasted blue blazer.  The only problem: he looks awful.

Why?  His jacket is so shrunken it’s straining against his body.  The almost self-parodic waist suppression has taken him from “strong shoulders and desirable man’s figure” to “woman wearing a corset,” and the short jacket has only emphasized that problem.  His buttons are straining to contain his midsection.  Maybe if he were emaciated he could pull off this look, but with a normal man’s body, he looks absurd.  Which is too bad, because he’s a handsome guy who looks to be pretty fit.

Remember that tailored clothing should make your body look better.  No trend is worth sacrificing a flattering shape.  The reason you alter a coat to fit you is not to see how tight you can make it; it’s to make it as flattering as possible.  This means it should make you look tall, athletic and healthy.  This should be informed by your real body - you don’t need big shoulderpads or a huge amount of structure to get there - but it should always flatter.  This looks like an advertisement for girdles.

It’s getting harder and harder for me to resist the pull of the double-breasted blue blazer.
Q and Answer
Jordan writes:
I just bought a navy blue blazer from a thrift store.  The blazer came with old brass buttons that I’ll have to be replace.  Will I be better to replace them with new brass buttons or dark navy blue buttons?
The blue blazer is a classic menswear staple.  It pairs well with almost anything and is appropriate for almost any occasion that doesn’t call for a suit.  That said, the classic brass buttons can look a little fogeyish.  If you’re wearing them to your country club for a soiree, maybe that’s appropriate, but we’re not crazy about the idea.
Navy buttons (as seen on Kenneth, above) are fine, but they can, in some cases, make the coat look like an orphaned suit jacket.  We like a natural bone color, which will go nicely with brown shoes and is pretty neutral.  If you’re a bit more adventurous, a white bone or horn button also looks really cool.
You can find button sets pretty easily (and cheaply) on Ebay or at a local fabric store.  Your tailor or alterationist will likely charge about a dollar a button to switch them out for you.
While you’re on Ebay, by the way, be sure to check out blazer button sets in precious metals (silver and gold!) and for odd clubs and organizations.  You may not belong to the New York Fencing Society, but it might be kind of cool to have thier buttons on your thrift store blazer.

Q and Answer

Jordan writes:

I just bought a navy blue blazer from a thrift store.  The blazer came with old brass buttons that I’ll have to be replace.  Will I be better to replace them with new brass buttons or dark navy blue buttons?

The blue blazer is a classic menswear staple.  It pairs well with almost anything and is appropriate for almost any occasion that doesn’t call for a suit.  That said, the classic brass buttons can look a little fogeyish.  If you’re wearing them to your country club for a soiree, maybe that’s appropriate, but we’re not crazy about the idea.

Navy buttons (as seen on Kenneth, above) are fine, but they can, in some cases, make the coat look like an orphaned suit jacket.  We like a natural bone color, which will go nicely with brown shoes and is pretty neutral.  If you’re a bit more adventurous, a white bone or horn button also looks really cool.

You can find button sets pretty easily (and cheaply) on Ebay or at a local fabric store.  Your tailor or alterationist will likely charge about a dollar a button to switch them out for you.

While you’re on Ebay, by the way, be sure to check out blazer button sets in precious metals (silver and gold!) and for odd clubs and organizations.  You may not belong to the New York Fencing Society, but it might be kind of cool to have thier buttons on your thrift store blazer.