Put This On Season 2, Episode 6 Clothing Credits

Intro & Outro

Suit: High Society Tailor (Fabric by Molloy & Sons)
Tie: Saks 5th
Shirt: CEGO Custom Shirts
Pocket Square: Put This On

In Interviews

Suit: Vintage
Shirt: CEGO Custom Shirts
Tie: Vintage
Shoes: Alden
Pocket Square: Put This On

New York: American Sember Closing Sale
A tip from our friend Carl Goldberg at CEGO Custom Shirtmaker in New York: the New York shirting wholesaler American Sember will be closing. That’s lousy news for shirt fans on the Eastern Seaboard, as the company was one of the best suppliers of fine shirt fabrics. In the short-term, though, it’s good news for New York clothing fans, as they’re clearing out their stock at discount prices, and they’re selling directly to customers, not just shirtmakers.
Here are the details from Carl:

This is strictly cash and carry. There will be fabric available from the following mills Albrecht & Morgan (Swiss) Alumo (Swiss) Grandi & Rubinelli (Italy) Ferno (Italy) Testa (Italy) S.I.C Tess (Italy) Thomas Mason Silver Line $25-33 per yard and Goldline $40 per yard D. J Anderson and Soyella $45 The rest of the fabric 36” is $10 per yard and 60” is $20 per yard. (Check with your shirt maker to see how much you will need.) There are also MOP buttons from Gritti (italy) no white 18L lots of colors Tuxedo pleatings Lining for inside collars and cuffs.

Give them a call before you stop by. Here’s their info:
American Sember 29 West 30th St #702 btw 5th and Broadway. 212 889-6188 Amsember@aol.com
And if you don’t already have a shirtmaker, Carl has offered to make up any 60” fabrics from the sale for $125. He’ll do you right. His info is on his site.

New York: American Sember Closing Sale

A tip from our friend Carl Goldberg at CEGO Custom Shirtmaker in New York: the New York shirting wholesaler American Sember will be closing. That’s lousy news for shirt fans on the Eastern Seaboard, as the company was one of the best suppliers of fine shirt fabrics. In the short-term, though, it’s good news for New York clothing fans, as they’re clearing out their stock at discount prices, and they’re selling directly to customers, not just shirtmakers.

Here are the details from Carl:

This is strictly cash and carry.
There will be fabric available from the following mills
Albrecht & Morgan (Swiss)
Alumo (Swiss)
Grandi & Rubinelli (Italy)
Ferno (Italy)
Testa (Italy)
S.I.C Tess (Italy)
Thomas Mason Silver Line $25-33 per yard and Goldline $40 per yard
D. J Anderson and Soyella $45

The rest of the fabric 36” is $10 per yard and 60” is $20 per yard. (Check with your shirt maker to see how much you will need.)
There are also MOP buttons from Gritti (italy) no white 18L lots of colors
Tuxedo pleatings
Lining for inside collars and cuffs.

Give them a call before you stop by. Here’s their info:

American Sember
29 West 30th St #702 btw 5th and Broadway.
212 889-6188
Amsember@aol.com

And if you don’t already have a shirtmaker, Carl has offered to make up any 60” fabrics from the sale for $125. He’ll do you right. His info is on his site.

Ed Morel and Bruce Boyer, at the Panta trunk show Jesse talked about. 
Both gentlemen have especially nice shirt collars on. 

Ed Morel and Bruce Boyer, at the Panta trunk show Jesse talked about. 

Both gentlemen have especially nice shirt collars on. 

If you’re in New York City, you won’t want to miss tomorrow’s Panta trunk show. Founder Ed Morel will be on hand with a selection of pants, ties and (new) suits and sportcoats. It’s at CEGO Custom Shirtmaker, and Carl (who you may remember from our Body episode) will be offering some CEGO stuff - pajama bottoms, orphaned shirts, that kind of thing - along with the Panta line.
We’ve reviewed Panta’s beautiful ties, which are about a hundred bucks, but they’ll also be offering a full range of trousers for about $300, sportcoats for $850-950 and suits for about $1200. I’m really impressed by what Morel has been up to, and you should stop by and say “hi” to Ed and Carl even if you can’t scrape up the scratch to buy anything.
Find the sale Friday, March 23rd at the CEGO Custom Shirtmakers shop, 246 Fifth Avenue (corner of 28th), Second Floor, from 11:00-6:00pm.

If you’re in New York City, you won’t want to miss tomorrow’s Panta trunk show. Founder Ed Morel will be on hand with a selection of pants, ties and (new) suits and sportcoats. It’s at CEGO Custom Shirtmaker, and Carl (who you may remember from our Body episode) will be offering some CEGO stuff - pajama bottoms, orphaned shirts, that kind of thing - along with the Panta line.

We’ve reviewed Panta’s beautiful ties, which are about a hundred bucks, but they’ll also be offering a full range of trousers for about $300, sportcoats for $850-950 and suits for about $1200. I’m really impressed by what Morel has been up to, and you should stop by and say “hi” to Ed and Carl even if you can’t scrape up the scratch to buy anything.

Find the sale Friday, March 23rd at the CEGO Custom Shirtmakers shop, 246 Fifth Avenue (corner of 28th), Second Floor, from 11:00-6:00pm.

Put This On Episode 6: Body

Jesse Thorn visits Carl Goldberg, owner of CEGO Custom Shirtmaker in New York City, to learn the difference between a custom shirt and an off-the-rack shirt. Then it’s off to Alan Flusser Custom in New York for a visit with the proprietor, a menswear legend. Flusser offers some tips on dressing for your body with the help of three associates of Put This On. Finally, a visit with Ryu Kwangeol at Pro Tailor in Los Angeles to answer a viewer’s question about altering off-the-rack dress shirts.

Previously: Put This On: A Conversation with Alan Flusser

iTunes / Vimeo / YouTube

Clothing Credits

Funding Credits

Related Posts

Our favorite custom shirt shop, CEGO, has teamed up with one of our favorite eBay sellers for a very unique sample sale in Manhattan. Aaron obtained the stock of Alan Flusser’s custom shop when it changed management, and is offering a sale of sample goods and fabrics from the store. The goods will pretty much run the gamut, and Aaron assures me there’s lots of good stuff. Of special note to people who wear the sample jacket size of the show, 41L. (Like me, dammit, all the way out here in LA.) You can check out photos here.
Carl from CEGO tells me they’ll be offering a special $100 labor rate if you buy shirting fabric from Aaron, and some of CEGOs fabrics will be on sale as well.
WHEN: Friday April 29 12-7, Saturday April 30 10-4WHERE 246 Fifth Avenue (at 28th St), Suite 511, New York, NY

Our favorite custom shirt shop, CEGO, has teamed up with one of our favorite eBay sellers for a very unique sample sale in Manhattan. Aaron obtained the stock of Alan Flusser’s custom shop when it changed management, and is offering a sale of sample goods and fabrics from the store. The goods will pretty much run the gamut, and Aaron assures me there’s lots of good stuff. Of special note to people who wear the sample jacket size of the show, 41L. (Like me, dammit, all the way out here in LA.) You can check out photos here.

Carl from CEGO tells me they’ll be offering a special $100 labor rate if you buy shirting fabric from Aaron, and some of CEGOs fabrics will be on sale as well.

WHEN: Friday April 29 12-7, Saturday April 30 10-4

WHERE 246 Fifth Avenue (at 28th St), Suite 511, New York, NY

The online made-to-measure shirt tailor Modern Tailor is offering a $19.95 introductory offer for shirts in their simplest blue oxford fabric. I’ve been looking for a couple of plain blue button-down oxfords, and for $24.95 each I bought three. The extra $5 was because I opted for thick mother of pearl buttons. Shipping added $20 to the total.
My measurements were based upon a made-to-measure oxford by my shirt maker, CEGO in New York (who I recommend wholeheartedly, by the way). If you don’t have a great-fitting shirt to base your measurements upon, I would be careful ordering more than one shirt.
I’ve been a bit skeptical of online made-to-measure, frankly, but I get many emails from folks who can’t find a shirt that fits them because of an unusual body type, and not everyone can afford $125-200 per shirt for a traditional custom shirt. For those people, operations like Modern Tailor and Jantzen can be a good option, though fabric can’t be inspected in person and one doesn’t get consultation from an expert.
We’ll see how these turn out. I’m already worrying about whether they’ll account for laundry shrinkage. Still, $25 is less than Lands’ End, and nothing ventured, nothing gained. Looking forward to the shirts’ arrival.

The online made-to-measure shirt tailor Modern Tailor is offering a $19.95 introductory offer for shirts in their simplest blue oxford fabric. I’ve been looking for a couple of plain blue button-down oxfords, and for $24.95 each I bought three. The extra $5 was because I opted for thick mother of pearl buttons. Shipping added $20 to the total.

My measurements were based upon a made-to-measure oxford by my shirt maker, CEGO in New York (who I recommend wholeheartedly, by the way). If you don’t have a great-fitting shirt to base your measurements upon, I would be careful ordering more than one shirt.

I’ve been a bit skeptical of online made-to-measure, frankly, but I get many emails from folks who can’t find a shirt that fits them because of an unusual body type, and not everyone can afford $125-200 per shirt for a traditional custom shirt. For those people, operations like Modern Tailor and Jantzen can be a good option, though fabric can’t be inspected in person and one doesn’t get consultation from an expert.

We’ll see how these turn out. I’m already worrying about whether they’ll account for laundry shrinkage. Still, $25 is less than Lands’ End, and nothing ventured, nothing gained. Looking forward to the shirts’ arrival.

Put This On Episode 4: Clothing Credits

At Larchmont Barbershop

Jacket - A. Di Nella & Son of Philadelphia (Vintage)

Shirt - Luciano Barbera

Tie - Courtesy of Berg & Berg

Pants - Brunello Cucinelli

Pocket Square - Etro

The Wet Shave

Pajamas - Brooks Brothers

Robe - Holliday & Brown for Prada

In the Closet

Blazer - Chester Barrie

Shirt - CEGO Custom Shirtmakers

Pants - Brunello Cucinelli

Shoes - Vintage Florsheim

Tie - Vintage Bullock & Jones

Pocket Square - Courtesy of Kent Wang

Q and Answer: Why are there two buttons on my cuff?
Alejandro writes:  What’s the deal with the extra button on shirt cuffs? I’d always assumed that it was so people with thicker/skinner wrists could have a better fit at the cuff of the sleeve, but does that mean you should cut out the extra button? I’ve always hesitated to do so because sometimes it’s nice to have it on the wider button on the left cuff when I wear a watch (I have skinny wrists).
Carl Goldberg, who runs CEGO Custom Shirts in New York, is a friend of ours (and my shirtmaker). He’s always complaining about how big the cuffs are on ready-to-wear shirts. He says your cuff should be just wide enough to slide over your wrist joint and fit over your wristwatch.
You’ve pretty much figured out the reasons for those buttons. Some people prefer a narrower cuff, some a larger one. Some people wear big giant stupid watches, some people wear normal, non-ridiculous watches. Some people have big wrists, some little ones. The buttons are your choice.
Our recommendation: if the smaller-size-cuff button fits, then go with that one.

Q and Answer: Why are there two buttons on my cuff?

Alejandro writes: What’s the deal with the extra button on shirt cuffs? I’d always
assumed that it was so people with thicker/skinner wrists could have a
better fit at the cuff of the sleeve, but does that mean you should
cut out the extra button? I’ve always hesitated to do so because
sometimes it’s nice to have it on the wider button on the left cuff
when I wear a watch (I have skinny wrists).

Carl Goldberg, who runs CEGO Custom Shirts in New York, is a friend of ours (and my shirtmaker). He’s always complaining about how big the cuffs are on ready-to-wear shirts. He says your cuff should be just wide enough to slide over your wrist joint and fit over your wristwatch.

You’ve pretty much figured out the reasons for those buttons. Some people prefer a narrower cuff, some a larger one. Some people wear big giant stupid watches, some people wear normal, non-ridiculous watches. Some people have big wrists, some little ones. The buttons are your choice.

Our recommendation: if the smaller-size-cuff button fits, then go with that one.

One of the stops on our whirlwind tour of New York last week was my shirtmaker, Carl Goldberg of CEGO Custom Shirts in the Flatiron district.  Carl gave us a quick guide to shirt fit for an upcoming episode, and was exceptionally charming and gracious, as per usual.
Carl sent us word that he’s planning his annual sample sale on Thursday and Friday in New York.  Plenty of shirts, pocket squares and boxer shorts that didn’t quite fit or were part of an overage for very cheap prices.  If you’re in New York, stop by.  The sale isn’t at CEGO, but it’s right nearby:
 Flatiron Workshop 225 West 35th St  10th floor  between 7-8th ave Thursday  11-7 Friday 11-5 cash and check with ID.

One of the stops on our whirlwind tour of New York last week was my shirtmaker, Carl Goldberg of CEGO Custom Shirts in the Flatiron district.  Carl gave us a quick guide to shirt fit for an upcoming episode, and was exceptionally charming and gracious, as per usual.

Carl sent us word that he’s planning his annual sample sale on Thursday and Friday in New York.  Plenty of shirts, pocket squares and boxer shorts that didn’t quite fit or were part of an overage for very cheap prices.  If you’re in New York, stop by.  The sale isn’t at CEGO, but it’s right nearby:


Flatiron Workshop
225 West 35th St 10th floor between 7-8th ave
Thursday 11-7
Friday 11-5
cash and check with ID.