Fixing Snags
Fall is the season for sweaters and … snagging sweaters. If you end up getting a snag, there’s a good and bad way to fix it. 
The bad way is cutting it, which you absolutely don’t want to do. You might think that you’re getting rid of the pull, but over time, this area can develop a hole. 
A better solution is to pull the snag to the backside of the garment, so that the thread is still intact, but the damage is invisible. There are several ways to do this:
You can use a tool called a Snag Nab-It, which is basically a long needle with a rough end. Push it through your snag and the rough end will take it to the other side. I’ve used this successfully on knits and wovens (wovens meaning the non-stretchy material you find on dress shirts and trousers), but if your material is particularly fine or delicate, you might want to try another method. 
A gentler solution is to use a large sewing needle with a big eye. Couple this with a needle threader or some kind of thread, and use both to “catch” the snag as you pull the needle through. You can also use some thick embroidery or button thread, which you can wrap your snag on, and do the same thing. Remember, for something really delicate, go slow. It’s better to work this area a few times, rather than worsen the damage. 
For the truly patient, you can use also a large blunt needle and try to tease the yarn back to its original place. Pull the thread through to the next stitch, and then the next, and then the next — dispersing the excess material evenly across the row. You want to work both sides of the snag, so that everything looks natural. This easier on large gauge knits, but it’s possible with fine ones as well. Once you’re done, steam the area and admire your work. 

Fixing Snags

Fall is the season for sweaters and … snagging sweaters. If you end up getting a snag, there’s a good and bad way to fix it. 

The bad way is cutting it, which you absolutely don’t want to do. You might think that you’re getting rid of the pull, but over time, this area can develop a hole. 

A better solution is to pull the snag to the backside of the garment, so that the thread is still intact, but the damage is invisible. There are several ways to do this:

  • You can use a tool called a Snag Nab-It, which is basically a long needle with a rough end. Push it through your snag and the rough end will take it to the other side. I’ve used this successfully on knits and wovens (wovens meaning the non-stretchy material you find on dress shirts and trousers), but if your material is particularly fine or delicate, you might want to try another method. 
  • A gentler solution is to use a large sewing needle with a big eye. Couple this with a needle threader or some kind of thread, and use both to “catch” the snag as you pull the needle through. You can also use some thick embroidery or button thread, which you can wrap your snag on, and do the same thing. Remember, for something really delicate, go slow. It’s better to work this area a few times, rather than worsen the damage. 

For the truly patient, you can use also a large blunt needle and try to tease the yarn back to its original place. Pull the thread through to the next stitch, and then the next, and then the next — dispersing the excess material evenly across the row. You want to work both sides of the snag, so that everything looks natural. This easier on large gauge knits, but it’s possible with fine ones as well. Once you’re done, steam the area and admire your work. 

Most Common Types of Denim Damage (and How to Avoid Them)

Coincidentally, shortly after Jesse’s post last week on patching jeans, I received my 3sixteens back from Denim Therapy — one of the many shops nowadays that specializes in denim repairs. Like Jesse, I’ve had my jeans for about five years now — and although they’ve already seen a trip to Self Edge’s Darn It (another speciality repair place) — they’ve experienced some more wear-and-tear in the last year and needed fixing. So, I thought I’d do a post on the most common types of denim damage and how they can be repaired, as well as avoided altogether.  

Crotch Blowouts

Crotch blowouts refer to when you get holes in the place where you least want holes. To fix them, you can use any of the methods listed in Jesse’s post, although for this specific issue, I recommend darning. That’s when a specialist “reweaves” new threads into the material, using threads that most closely match your pants. This not only makes the repair nearly invisible (which is nice since this is, um, at your crotch), but it’s also much sturdier than patching. The downside? It’s also more expensive. 

How to avoid: Wash your jeans more often. It doesn’t have to be after every wear, but it’s the combination of dirt accumulating and the fabric rubbing against itself that causes blowouts. Those dirt particles act like tiny little razors, first thinning the material, and then finally breaking it open.

Other Holes 

Areas around the thighs and knees can also wear thin and eventually break. For these repairs, you can again refer to Jesse’s post. I personally like the slightly more ad hoc method of just patching thighs and knees with a piece of cloth. Jesse’s LVC jeans look great here. A local tailor should be able to do that for you for not too much money. And if the holes aren’t too big, you can also just leave them in, like I’ve done above. Personally, I think a hole or two can give a pair of jeans some character. 

How to avoid: Again, wash your jeans more often.

Stretched Buttonholes

Whether because you’ve gained weight or initially sized too far down, the buttonholes on your jeans can stretch with time. If the damage isn’t too bad, a local tailor can reinforce the area with new stitching. If it’s really stretched out, however, then you’ll need to get the area darned. I had the second done, and you can see the results above. 

How to avoid: Raw jeans are often a bit tight at first in the waist, but you don’t have to size so far down that things feel skin tight. Doing so will just put unnecessary stress on the buttonholes. 

Damage at the Cuffs

If you wash your jeans infrequently and leave them cuffed, you’ll find that the dirt that accumulates will eventually wear through at the crease. Unfortunately, the solutions here are less than ideal. You can get the cuffs darned, but the material will be stiff and hard to fold again (you use an iron to help them along). Otherwise, you can ride them out until the cuffs fall off, at which point, a tailor can put in a new hem (which is what I’d recommend).

How to avoid: Uncuff your pants every once in a while and brush out the dirt. You can use your hand (obviously), or a clothes brush. Having a clothes brush is handy if you have tailored clothes (suits, sport coats, the like), as that’s how they should be regularly cleaned

If you’re looking for a darning service, check out Self Edge’s Darn ItDenim Therapy, and Denim Surgeon. For more suggestions, check this SuperFuture thread dedicated to denim repairs.

Cleaning Sneakers

Some things look better new; some things look better old. Anyone who has ever bought a brand new pair of white Supergas, for example, can you tell you how self-conscious one can get when those bright white uppers are shining from your feet like beacons. It really takes about a dozen wears before they get dirty enough to look good. Any of the sneakers sold by Nike, on the other hand, look best when they’re box fresh.

At the end of every summer, I clean those sneakers I own that I think could use a cleaning. There are a number of different methods for this. My co-writer Pete, for example, mentioned a technique last year involving Mr. Clean Magic Erasers (which are fantastic for cleaning around the house, by the way). Your local supermarket probably has a generic version of the same thing, if you want to save a little money. Just be warned: as Pete mentioned, these are made from melamine foam, which is a mild abrasive that can take the finish off of your shoes.

This past weekend, I tried Jason Markk’s Premium Shoe Cleaner, which is popular among sneakerheads. The kit is simple: there’s a 4oz bottle of cleaning solution and a stiff bristle brush. You dip the brush in water, apply the solution, and scrub away. The combination is surprisingly effective, and the solution is said to be safe on any material (leather, suede, nubuck, canvas, etc). It does take a couple of rounds of cleaning to get things back to like-new conditions, however, and I found that a little elbow grease is needed on the textured sides of rubber soles.

The kit runs for about $16-24 at Amazon, Nordstrom, and other locations, and $12 at Jack Threads. The company also has a store in Los Angeles for more involved sneaker restorations. Unfortunately, as of now, they’ll only take drop-offs, so you have to be in the local area.

(Pictured above: My Engineered Garments x Vans slip-ons, before and after a cleaning. For more examples of people cleaning with a Jason Markk kit, you can check out videos posted on YouTube)

Building a Patina

As a guy who owns more footwear than he probably should, I’ve found that my best looking shoes aren’t the ones that were most expensive. They’re simply the ones I’ve owned the longest, and thus, have been worn the most. The nice thing about quality shoes is that they’re made from high-end, full-grain leathers, which not only last a long time, but also develop a beautiful patina. 

To be sure, shoes can develop a “patina” in any number of ways. Michael Alden from Dress With Style once did a video on how to antique shoes with Pierre-Paul Hofflin of Talon Rouge. The process is quite involved, and probably best left to experts, but you can see some examples of antiqued shoes at Talon Rouge and Dandy Shoe Care. Brave souls who want to try such methods can refer to that video, as well as this post at The Shoe Snob.

Personally, I like how shoes look when they age naturally – that is, with regular wear and proper maintenance. The process isn’t terribly different from what you’ve read in other shoe care tutorials, although I’ve found certain modified techniques to be slightly useful:

  • For workboots, do nothing at all. You might have to treat them to leather conditioner once a year, so the uppers don’t dry out, but rugged boots look best when they’re a bit dirty and dull. Andrew Chen of 3sixteen, for example, wore these Viberg service boots for eighteen months before using any conditioners or cleaners. Let your boots get beat up, and admire how they age. 
  • For shoes you might wear with tailored clothing, use conditioner and polish regularly. Conditioner will help deepen the color of leather, and give the surface a nice glow, while polish will build multiple layers of color. I use both cream and wax polishes on mine, with the wax polish being applied last, since it really helps raise a shine. Most importantly: don’t be afraid to use darker polishes. Some people use black polish on brown shoes, but I find this gives a slightly unappealing grainy appearance. Instead, I just go one shade darker than my shoes’ regular color. Remember, you want those multiple layers of color to look natural, but you also don’t want to match your uppers too closely. 
  • For loafers or similarly casual shoes, do the same thing as you would for dress shoes, but leave the wax polish off. I think of loafers as being in-between workboots and dress shoes – you want them to look a little dressy, so it’s nice if they have a bit of a glow, but you don’t want them as shiny as real dress shoes. So stick to leather conditioner and cream polish to give that gentle shine, and leave the wax off. The conditioner again here will deepen the color of leather, while the cream polish will build multiple layers of color (not overnight, but perhaps over two years’ time). 

Most of all, wear your shoes regularly and don’t get too hung up on wrinkles and superficial scuffs. You don’t want to purposefully destroy your shoes — but just as raw denim looks good with honest wear, so does quality leather. 

(Photos via me, That One Guy, Mr. Moo, For the Discerning Few, and Andrew Chen)

Q & Answer: Fixing Holes or Tears in Tailored Clothing
Craig asks: I recently developed a small tear on the right side of my suit pants, and the place that made the suit no longer has the original fabric, so I can’t have another pair made (the suit was custom). Is there anything I can do besides throw these away? I’m open to anything, but would like to not throw good money after bad. 
One of the biggest myths about expensive clothes is that they’ll last you a lifetime. Some things last a while, to be sure, but no matter how well made, anything can develop a hole, snag, or tear. When these things happen with suits or sport coats, the best solution is usually to have the fabric “rewoven.”
That can mean one of two things. The first is what’s known as French reweaving or invisible reweaving, where individual strands of thread are woven into the original cloth. It’s sort of like what I recently had done on my sweater. In this way, the new threads are “filling in” the hole. 
The other technique is known as overweaving or inweaving. Here, a small patch is used to cover up the hole or tear, and then the frayed edges are woven into the suit in order to help conceal the patch. As you can guess, French reweaving tends to be good for small holes or tears, while inweaving is good for anything that’s too big to easily “fill.”
Note, any kind of repair can be seen if you look hard enough. The question is just how well it can be made to look “invisible.” Often times, such are repairs are very, very good and will be hard to detect, but a lot depends on the damage and fabric at hand. Generally speaking:
Darker colors are easier to work with, although for some reweavers, black is the hardest of all.
The finer the weave, the more difficult it is to repair (no surprise).
Solids are typically easier to work with than patterns, but a lot depends on the type of pattern that’s being compared.
Anything with synthetics will be hard to work with, if not impossible.
You mentioned that you had the suit custom made. In such cases, it’s sometimes a good to keep a little extra of the cloth, just for situations like this. Otherwise, the reweaver will have to take material from an inconspicuous place on your suit, or try to find a closely matching material somewhere on the market. Sometimes your tailor will keep a little extra of the original cloth (even if it’s not enough for a new pair of pants) and have a reweaver he or she can recommend. It’s best to check with them. Otherwise, search around for a reweaver. For what it’s worth, I’ve had good experiences sending sport coats to Best Weaving & Mending, and sending knitwear to The French American Reweaving Company.

Q & Answer: Fixing Holes or Tears in Tailored Clothing

Craig asks: I recently developed a small tear on the right side of my suit pants, and the place that made the suit no longer has the original fabric, so I can’t have another pair made (the suit was custom). Is there anything I can do besides throw these away? I’m open to anything, but would like to not throw good money after bad. 

One of the biggest myths about expensive clothes is that they’ll last you a lifetime. Some things last a while, to be sure, but no matter how well made, anything can develop a hole, snag, or tear. When these things happen with suits or sport coats, the best solution is usually to have the fabric “rewoven.”

That can mean one of two things. The first is what’s known as French reweaving or invisible reweaving, where individual strands of thread are woven into the original cloth. It’s sort of like what I recently had done on my sweater. In this way, the new threads are “filling in” the hole.

The other technique is known as overweaving or inweaving. Here, a small patch is used to cover up the hole or tear, and then the frayed edges are woven into the suit in order to help conceal the patch. As you can guess, French reweaving tends to be good for small holes or tears, while inweaving is good for anything that’s too big to easily “fill.”

Note, any kind of repair can be seen if you look hard enough. The question is just how well it can be made to look “invisible.” Often times, such are repairs are very, very good and will be hard to detect, but a lot depends on the damage and fabric at hand. Generally speaking:

  • Darker colors are easier to work with, although for some reweavers, black is the hardest of all.
  • The finer the weave, the more difficult it is to repair (no surprise).
  • Solids are typically easier to work with than patterns, but a lot depends on the type of pattern that’s being compared.
  • Anything with synthetics will be hard to work with, if not impossible.

You mentioned that you had the suit custom made. In such cases, it’s sometimes a good to keep a little extra of the cloth, just for situations like this. Otherwise, the reweaver will have to take material from an inconspicuous place on your suit, or try to find a closely matching material somewhere on the market. Sometimes your tailor will keep a little extra of the original cloth (even if it’s not enough for a new pair of pants) and have a reweaver he or she can recommend. It’s best to check with them. Otherwise, search around for a reweaver. For what it’s worth, I’ve had good experiences sending sport coats to Best Weaving & Mending, and sending knitwear to The French American Reweaving Company.

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Wear

Like anyone who feels guilty about how much they’ve spent on their shoes, I’m fairly good at taking care of my footwear. I apply cream and wax polishes every few weeks, and leather conditioner even more frequently. Before any pair goes out for wearing, it gets brushed down to remove any dust or dirt.

I’ve learned, however, that some shoes look better the less you take care of them. This includes work boots, engineer boots, camp mocs, boat shoes, and almost anything that’s considered extremely casual. These still get treated to leather conditioner, just not that often (maybe once every six months to a year). Things such as cream and wax polishes, however, never get used, and shoe trees never get inserted. If you’ve ever wondered whether these things really make a difference, just try going without them for a year. You’ll see that creases develop more quickly and set on deeper when they do. Scuffs and scars will also show up more without the “cover-up” of polish. 

For certain shoes, however you want this kind of “damage” to appear. It gives them character and makes them more lived-in. This gets back to a very fundamental idea that nothing looks good when it’s too new or too stiff. That doesn’t just go for certain styles of footwear – it goes for things such as tweed jackets, briefcases, and almost all kinds of outerwear. It’s perhaps for this reason why there are stories about how Fred Astaire used to throw his new bespoke suits up against the wall before wearing them, and how Charlie Davidson of The Andover Shop won’t even wear a new jacket until it’s been sitting on a hanger for a year. 

Of course, with dressier shoes, careful polishing, edge dressing, and even the occasional bulling can be great. Those will give your shoes a certain kind of luster that’s in keeping with the style. With everything else, however, all you need really is the occasional treatment of leather conditioner. As you can see in the last photo, as long as you buy shoes of good quality - and keep the leather supple so it doesn’t crack - they can be repaired to good effect. And why would you want to recraft an old pair of boat shoes when new ones can be bought for not much more money? Because the old ones look a lot better.   

(Photos via Andrew Chen of 3sixteen, Mister Freedom, Oak Street Bootmakers, and Rancourt)

Conditioning Leather Jackets
Folks who have read our blog for a while are probably familiar with the importance of treating leather shoes to conditioner every once in a while. Leather is a skin and needs to be routinely moisturized, otherwise it can dry out and crack. The same actually goes for almost any leather products, including leather jackets. Only here, you may need a different conditioner. Lexol, for example, is perfectly fine for shoes, but can be too watery for garments. If you apply it to a jacket, it can seep through the shell and stain the lining.
For garments, many leather care experts recommend Pecard. To figure out which of their products you need, you’ll first have to figure out what kind of material you’re working with. Most leather jackets are made from one of four types of skins – goat, lamb, cow, and horse – and each can have their own “treatments.”
Which Leather Conditioner to Buy
Generally speaking, lambskin and goatskin will be relatively lightweight and thin, while cowhide and horsehide will be thick and heavy (lambskin can goatskin can also sometimes be thick, but this isn’t common). Just check the thickness and weight of your piece to figure out the skin; it should be fairly obvious.
To figure out how your leather has been treated, you can place a droplet of water on the surface and let it sit for thirty seconds. If there’s a dark spot when you wipe it away (don’t worry, it’ll eventually disappear), it’s most likely an oil-tanned leather; if there’s no dark spot, it’s probably coated. Similarly, you can gently scratch the surface with your fingernail. If it leaves a mark, it’s oil-tanned; if it doesn’t, it’s coated.
For coated leathers, lambskins, and goatskins, spread a small amount of Pecard’s Fashion Leather Lotion with a lint-free cloth, and give it ten minutes to dry before wearing. For oil-tanned leathers made from cowhide or horsehide, apply a light coat of Weatherproof Dressing and give your jacket twelve to twenty-four hours to absorb the conditioner. Then, buff off any excess with a smooth, lint-free cloth (an old t-shirt will do), and you’re good to go. Their neutral dressing is perhaps most popular among leather jacket enthusiasts, but you can use black and brown to help cover any minor scratches or scuffs, or to help restore color. Just use a sparing amount, and as always, test the conditioner on some inconspicuous spot first, to make sure it’s OK for your specific garment.
Tip for Vintage Shoppers
Note, if you’re out thrifting for a leather jacket, you’ll probably come across a few that look old, neglected, and dry. So long as the leather isn’t cracked, you can sometimes restore these pieces with a few caring treatments of Pecard. This is a great way to pick up something nice that everyone else has passed on.

Conditioning Leather Jackets

Folks who have read our blog for a while are probably familiar with the importance of treating leather shoes to conditioner every once in a while. Leather is a skin and needs to be routinely moisturized, otherwise it can dry out and crack. The same actually goes for almost any leather products, including leather jackets. Only here, you may need a different conditioner. Lexol, for example, is perfectly fine for shoes, but can be too watery for garments. If you apply it to a jacket, it can seep through the shell and stain the lining.

For garments, many leather care experts recommend Pecard. To figure out which of their products you need, you’ll first have to figure out what kind of material you’re working with. Most leather jackets are made from one of four types of skins – goat, lamb, cow, and horse – and each can have their own “treatments.”

Which Leather Conditioner to Buy

Generally speaking, lambskin and goatskin will be relatively lightweight and thin, while cowhide and horsehide will be thick and heavy (lambskin can goatskin can also sometimes be thick, but this isn’t common). Just check the thickness and weight of your piece to figure out the skin; it should be fairly obvious.

To figure out how your leather has been treated, you can place a droplet of water on the surface and let it sit for thirty seconds. If there’s a dark spot when you wipe it away (don’t worry, it’ll eventually disappear), it’s most likely an oil-tanned leather; if there’s no dark spot, it’s probably coated. Similarly, you can gently scratch the surface with your fingernail. If it leaves a mark, it’s oil-tanned; if it doesn’t, it’s coated.

For coated leathers, lambskins, and goatskins, spread a small amount of Pecard’s Fashion Leather Lotion with a lint-free cloth, and give it ten minutes to dry before wearing. For oil-tanned leathers made from cowhide or horsehide, apply a light coat of Weatherproof Dressing and give your jacket twelve to twenty-four hours to absorb the conditioner. Then, buff off any excess with a smooth, lint-free cloth (an old t-shirt will do), and you’re good to go. Their neutral dressing is perhaps most popular among leather jacket enthusiasts, but you can use black and brown to help cover any minor scratches or scuffs, or to help restore color. Just use a sparing amount, and as always, test the conditioner on some inconspicuous spot first, to make sure it’s OK for your specific garment.

Tip for Vintage Shoppers

Note, if you’re out thrifting for a leather jacket, you’ll probably come across a few that look old, neglected, and dry. So long as the leather isn’t cracked, you can sometimes restore these pieces with a few caring treatments of Pecard. This is a great way to pick up something nice that everyone else has passed on.

Should You Use Sole Protectors?
A long time ago, when I first started buying high-quality footwear, I used to have my cobbler put sole protectors on all my shoes. Sole protectors are thin rubber sheets that can be put at the bottom of soles. They protect your shoes from wear and thus limit the number of times you need to have them resoled. 
I did this for years until I realized that it wasn’t saving me much money. Having protectors put on usually costs about $25. Having soles replaced usually costs about $50-75. I found that protectors lasted about a year and a half, while leather soles could go for about three to four years. Obviously, your mileage may vary, as a lot will depend on how often you wear your shoes and what type of surfaces you walk on, but from my experience, the savings were minimal, if there were any at all.
So, what are the reasons why someone might want to get sole protectors? Well, for one, they arguably provide slightly more traction, especially on smooth, indoor floors. They could also be more economical if you don’t have someone in your area who can resole your shoes for a reasonable fee. If you send your shoes back to the original manufacturer, or to certain shoe refurbishing shops, you can pay anywhere from  $125 to $300. That typically comes with more service - your uppers can be refurbished, and you might get a free pair of shoe trees or something - but if you don’t need those things, you’re effectively paying ~$125-300 for a resoling. That’s significantly more than the $50-75 a local cobbler might charge (assuming you have someone you trust).
Shoes can also be resoled only so many times, and every resoling comes with a bit of risk. Almost all welted shoes, for example, are made with a linen holdfast called “gemming.” Some experts have noted that this can rip during a resole, and once this happens, the gemming can’t be easily repositioned, which means you shoes will walk out of shape. Thus, the fewer resolings you need to do, the better.
The downside is that sole protectors are a bit ugly, especially the ones made by Topy. Admittedly, nobody ever really sees the bottom of your shoes, but sometimes they do if you cross your legs (or become the President of the United States and put your feet on the table, right in front of a photographer, as shown above). Plus, if your sole protectors are not correctly applied, moisture can seep in, which in turn can cause rotting. Certain companies, such as Edward Green, also claim that rubber protectors prevent your soles from “breathing,” which in turn can shorten their life. (I’m skeptical of this, but you can take it for what it’s worth.)
In the end, whether or not you should add sole protectors is up to you, and a lot will depend on various factors, but at least now you know what are some of the factors you should consider. The value is not obvious. 

Should You Use Sole Protectors?

A long time ago, when I first started buying high-quality footwear, I used to have my cobbler put sole protectors on all my shoes. Sole protectors are thin rubber sheets that can be put at the bottom of soles. They protect your shoes from wear and thus limit the number of times you need to have them resoled. 

I did this for years until I realized that it wasn’t saving me much money. Having protectors put on usually costs about $25. Having soles replaced usually costs about $50-75. I found that protectors lasted about a year and a half, while leather soles could go for about three to four years. Obviously, your mileage may vary, as a lot will depend on how often you wear your shoes and what type of surfaces you walk on, but from my experience, the savings were minimal, if there were any at all.

So, what are the reasons why someone might want to get sole protectors? Well, for one, they arguably provide slightly more traction, especially on smooth, indoor floors. They could also be more economical if you don’t have someone in your area who can resole your shoes for a reasonable fee. If you send your shoes back to the original manufacturer, or to certain shoe refurbishing shops, you can pay anywhere from  $125 to $300. That typically comes with more service - your uppers can be refurbished, and you might get a free pair of shoe trees or something - but if you don’t need those things, you’re effectively paying ~$125-300 for a resoling. That’s significantly more than the $50-75 a local cobbler might charge (assuming you have someone you trust).

Shoes can also be resoled only so many times, and every resoling comes with a bit of risk. Almost all welted shoes, for example, are made with a linen holdfast called “gemming.” Some experts have noted that this can rip during a resole, and once this happens, the gemming can’t be easily repositioned, which means you shoes will walk out of shape. Thus, the fewer resolings you need to do, the better.

The downside is that sole protectors are a bit ugly, especially the ones made by Topy. Admittedly, nobody ever really sees the bottom of your shoes, but sometimes they do if you cross your legs (or become the President of the United States and put your feet on the table, right in front of a photographer, as shown above). Plus, if your sole protectors are not correctly applied, moisture can seep in, which in turn can cause rotting. Certain companies, such as Edward Green, also claim that rubber protectors prevent your soles from “breathing,” which in turn can shorten their life. (I’m skeptical of this, but you can take it for what it’s worth.)

In the end, whether or not you should add sole protectors is up to you, and a lot will depend on various factors, but at least now you know what are some of the factors you should consider. The value is not obvious. 

Q and Answer: Can I Get Bedbugs From Used Clothes on eBay?
Dwight asks: What is the risk of getting bedbugs from an eBay purchase and what are the proper steps to mitigate them?
The risk of getting bedbugs from an eBay or other second-hand clothing purchase is very small, but it’s not zero. It’s increased a bit if you’re shopping somewhere where bedbugs are more widespread, like New York City. Bedbugs prefer the regular blood meals that bedding provides, so they don’t travel much via clothing, but they can go without eating for quite a long time. If they end up in clothes, they can hang out for up to a year, waiting for snacking conditions to improve.
Luckily, if you’re concerned about bedbugs, it’s very simple to kill them.
Bedbugs can’t live in temperatures over about 115 degrees. So, if you want to kill any bedbugs that might be hiding out on a garment, just put it in the drier on hot for a few minutes. Expert recommend 15 or 20 to be safe, but say that even five or ten should do it. Dry cleaning will also kill bed bugs, so if you have a dry clean only garment, there’s no need to put it in the laundry.
Of course, cleaning second-hand clothes is good practice anyway. While some second-hand stores and vendors dry-clean clothing, some don’t, and dry-cleaning or laundering your new-old clothes will also eliminate the risk of bringing another terrifying pest into your home: clothing moths.

Q and Answer: Can I Get Bedbugs From Used Clothes on eBay?

Dwight asks: What is the risk of getting bedbugs from an eBay purchase and what are the proper steps to mitigate them?

The risk of getting bedbugs from an eBay or other second-hand clothing purchase is very small, but it’s not zero. It’s increased a bit if you’re shopping somewhere where bedbugs are more widespread, like New York City. Bedbugs prefer the regular blood meals that bedding provides, so they don’t travel much via clothing, but they can go without eating for quite a long time. If they end up in clothes, they can hang out for up to a year, waiting for snacking conditions to improve.

Luckily, if you’re concerned about bedbugs, it’s very simple to kill them.

Bedbugs can’t live in temperatures over about 115 degrees. So, if you want to kill any bedbugs that might be hiding out on a garment, just put it in the drier on hot for a few minutes. Expert recommend 15 or 20 to be safe, but say that even five or ten should do it. Dry cleaning will also kill bed bugs, so if you have a dry clean only garment, there’s no need to put it in the laundry.

Of course, cleaning second-hand clothes is good practice anyway. While some second-hand stores and vendors dry-clean clothing, some don’t, and dry-cleaning or laundering your new-old clothes will also eliminate the risk of bringing another terrifying pest into your home: clothing moths.

Hanging to dry is better for your shirts and better for mother nature. If you have a backyard, take advantage of it. I just hung this clothesline two weeks ago, and I’ve been line drying like a madman.

Hanging to dry is better for your shirts and better for mother nature. If you have a backyard, take advantage of it. I just hung this clothesline two weeks ago, and I’ve been line drying like a madman.