Do I Really Have Ten Blue Blazers?
This morning, I’m spending a bit of time switching cold weather clothes for warm weather clothes. It’s a time of reckoning. And I reckon I’ve got a lot of blue blazers.
To my credit, I’ve only purchased one of them new, and most came from thrift shops. And what they say about blazers, that they’re the most versatile garment you can own, is true. But still… ten?
Here’s the rundown:
Classic Brooks Brothers. This is the blazer you think of when you think of a blazer. Brass buttons, the whole nine. Bought it at the thrift shop, and I rarely wear it… I’m not a brass button guy.
Classic Brooks Brothers (White Buttons). Another thrift store find - but I replaced the brass buttons with mother-of-pearl.
Kiton Double-Breasted. This one’s all cashmere. I bought it at a thrift store, and I think it may at one time have been the jacket of a suit. Since it’s so soft and unconstructed, and Italianate in style, it works great as a blazer. Replaced the buttons with light horn ones.
Chester Barrie Double-Breasted. I bought this one for $75 or something on eBay a week before I found the Kiton at the thrift. Put smoke mother-of-pearl buttons on it. It’s a little lighter than the Kiton, so it gets more warm-weather wear.
Polo Corduroy. This one gets out a lot when it’s cooler - and it was $30 or so on eBay.
Brooks Brothers Unconstructed Flannel. This one I found at a thrift store in Orange County. It fit perfectly off the rack, and one of the best-dressed guys I know, Elvis Mitchell, once told me it was gorgeous. Has brown horn buttons. Great for knocking around in cool weather.
Cantarelli Summer-Weight . This one’s very blogger approved - patch pockets all around, partial lining, open-weave wool. Got it from eBay for $50 or so. Couldn’t resist.
Custom Fresco Blazer. This was my first ever bespoke garment, from High Society Tailor in Los Angeles. It’s something prohibitively expensive off the rack that, living in LA, I wear all the time.
Vintage Flecked Blazer. This one’s from the late 50s, maybe the early 60s. I bought it at a thrift many years ago, and it’s a great going-out coat. Add a knit tie, a button-down shirt and grey flannels and you look like the big man on campus.
Freeman’s Sporting Club Shacket. Is this a blazer? Or a shirt? Or a shirt-jacket? It’s solid navy, so I’m calling it a blazer. A perfect thing to throw in the bag for a casual trip. Warm, fits a sweater underneath, looks great with jeans and chinos. Another $50-ish eBay purchase.
So what does it all mean? Am I a crazy person? Or do I just have the right tool for every job? Maybe the latter. Maybe the former.
(Edit: just took out my summer clothes. Blue Polo linen. That’s eleven.)

Do I Really Have Ten Blue Blazers?

This morning, I’m spending a bit of time switching cold weather clothes for warm weather clothes. It’s a time of reckoning. And I reckon I’ve got a lot of blue blazers.

To my credit, I’ve only purchased one of them new, and most came from thrift shops. And what they say about blazers, that they’re the most versatile garment you can own, is true. But still… ten?

Here’s the rundown:

  1. Classic Brooks Brothers. This is the blazer you think of when you think of a blazer. Brass buttons, the whole nine. Bought it at the thrift shop, and I rarely wear it… I’m not a brass button guy.
  2. Classic Brooks Brothers (White Buttons). Another thrift store find - but I replaced the brass buttons with mother-of-pearl.
  3. Kiton Double-Breasted. This one’s all cashmere. I bought it at a thrift store, and I think it may at one time have been the jacket of a suit. Since it’s so soft and unconstructed, and Italianate in style, it works great as a blazer. Replaced the buttons with light horn ones.
  4. Chester Barrie Double-Breasted. I bought this one for $75 or something on eBay a week before I found the Kiton at the thrift. Put smoke mother-of-pearl buttons on it. It’s a little lighter than the Kiton, so it gets more warm-weather wear.
  5. Polo Corduroy. This one gets out a lot when it’s cooler - and it was $30 or so on eBay.
  6. Brooks Brothers Unconstructed Flannel. This one I found at a thrift store in Orange County. It fit perfectly off the rack, and one of the best-dressed guys I know, Elvis Mitchell, once told me it was gorgeous. Has brown horn buttons. Great for knocking around in cool weather.
  7. Cantarelli Summer-Weight . This one’s very blogger approved - patch pockets all around, partial lining, open-weave wool. Got it from eBay for $50 or so. Couldn’t resist.
  8. Custom Fresco Blazer. This was my first ever bespoke garment, from High Society Tailor in Los Angeles. It’s something prohibitively expensive off the rack that, living in LA, I wear all the time.
  9. Vintage Flecked Blazer. This one’s from the late 50s, maybe the early 60s. I bought it at a thrift many years ago, and it’s a great going-out coat. Add a knit tie, a button-down shirt and grey flannels and you look like the big man on campus.
  10. Freeman’s Sporting Club Shacket. Is this a blazer? Or a shirt? Or a shirt-jacket? It’s solid navy, so I’m calling it a blazer. A perfect thing to throw in the bag for a casual trip. Warm, fits a sweater underneath, looks great with jeans and chinos. Another $50-ish eBay purchase.

So what does it all mean? Am I a crazy person? Or do I just have the right tool for every job? Maybe the latter. Maybe the former.

(Edit: just took out my summer clothes. Blue Polo linen. That’s eleven.)

Put This On Episode 4: Clothing Credits

At Larchmont Barbershop

Jacket - A. Di Nella & Son of Philadelphia (Vintage)

Shirt - Luciano Barbera

Tie - Courtesy of Berg & Berg

Pants - Brunello Cucinelli

Pocket Square - Etro

The Wet Shave

Pajamas - Brooks Brothers

Robe - Holliday & Brown for Prada

In the Closet

Blazer - Chester Barrie

Shirt - CEGO Custom Shirtmakers

Pants - Brunello Cucinelli

Shoes - Vintage Florsheim

Tie - Vintage Bullock & Jones

Pocket Square - Courtesy of Kent Wang

A Basic Suit
A few people have asked me what the best suit they can buy is for the very least amount of money.  My own basic suit is a Chester Barrie in solid navy, which I bought on eBay.  Chester Barrie are the makers for Ralph Lauren Purple Label - they’re among the best ready-to-wear suitings you can buy - and I paid about a hundred bucks.  If you want to save, and have the time, I recommend bargain-hunting (as always).  The reality is that you will not be able to buy a “good” suit for $300 at retail.  You do, however, have options to buy something that’s perfectly wearable.
One of those options is the Lands’ End tailored fit “Year-Rounder.”  When you’re looking for traditional clothes at full retail, Lands’ End is almost always your best bet on the low end.  Prices are low and quality is, if only rarely great, almost always decent.  You can find the coat here and the pants here.
Until the end of the day today (Monday), Lands’ End is offering a Friends & Family sale - 25% off all regularly-priced items.  Use the code FAMILYSHARE and the PIN 9392 for the discount.  With that discount, the suit is only $179.25, including shipping.  (If you miss that discount, it’s still a good value - you can also sign up for their mailing list, which has pretty regular discounts of 15-20%.)
Even the “tailored fit” at Lands’ End is pretty generous and a little broad shouldered, so you should expect (as with any suit) to have to do some tailoring when you receive it.  Similarly, the suit is pretty middle-of-the-road styling wise, more suitable for “serious suit” occasions than “nightclub suit” ones.  (If you’re looking for fashion, try Zara or H&M.)  Still, at $179, this is a great value if you need an inexpensive basic suit.
Oh, and don’t buy black.  Please, please don’t buy black.
(PS:  As The Silentist points out, they also have Allen Edmonds MacNeil longwings at $243, which is also an excellent price for an excellent basic.)

A Basic Suit

A few people have asked me what the best suit they can buy is for the very least amount of money.  My own basic suit is a Chester Barrie in solid navy, which I bought on eBay.  Chester Barrie are the makers for Ralph Lauren Purple Label - they’re among the best ready-to-wear suitings you can buy - and I paid about a hundred bucks.  If you want to save, and have the time, I recommend bargain-hunting (as always).  The reality is that you will not be able to buy a “good” suit for $300 at retail.  You do, however, have options to buy something that’s perfectly wearable.

One of those options is the Lands’ End tailored fit “Year-Rounder.”  When you’re looking for traditional clothes at full retail, Lands’ End is almost always your best bet on the low end.  Prices are low and quality is, if only rarely great, almost always decent.  You can find the coat here and the pants here.

Until the end of the day today (Monday), Lands’ End is offering a Friends & Family sale - 25% off all regularly-priced items.  Use the code FAMILYSHARE and the PIN 9392 for the discount.  With that discount, the suit is only $179.25, including shipping.  (If you miss that discount, it’s still a good value - you can also sign up for their mailing list, which has pretty regular discounts of 15-20%.)

Even the “tailored fit” at Lands’ End is pretty generous and a little broad shouldered, so you should expect (as with any suit) to have to do some tailoring when you receive it.  Similarly, the suit is pretty middle-of-the-road styling wise, more suitable for “serious suit” occasions than “nightclub suit” ones.  (If you’re looking for fashion, try Zara or H&M.)  Still, at $179, this is a great value if you need an inexpensive basic suit.

Oh, and don’t buy black.  Please, please don’t buy black.

(PS:  As The Silentist points out, they also have Allen Edmonds MacNeil longwings at $243, which is also an excellent price for an excellent basic.)