coppingandscheming asked:


Hi, I’m a big fan of the Clark desert boot. However i think it’s time to upgrade. I would like to find an option that is one step up in terms of quality and price. Do you have any suggestions?

Ah, the desert boot. The shoe that launched a thousand menswear blogs. One step up from Clarks unassailably basic desert boot (best in sand suede) is sort of a no man’s land of footwear. Clarks boots retail at $120 (although currently on sale <$100 at Need Supply). As you shop up the price ladder, styles vary a little, but quality doesn’t too much, until you get into the welted footwear makers; of course, their prices are triple the price of a pair of Clarks, or more. Some options:
A choice so obvious it risks being taken for granted is J. Crew’s Macalister boot. Macalisters are a little sharper and shapelier than Clarks and made in Italy of decent if not superlative soft suede. In the range between Clarks and $200, I’d pick the Macalisters. Plus they’re on sale for about $100 through May 24 with code PACKME.
Loake makes a desert boot that runs about $150. Loake is a Northampton-based shoe brand but their desert boots are made outside the UK in the EU. A little more interesting than the Clarks, but in my opinion, part of Clark’s appeal is their knockaround, anonymous quality. I’m borderline allergic to Loake’s darker color versions with contrast stitching.
If you’re willing and able to spend more or wait for sales, two upgraded desert boots worth buying are Church’s Sahara (pictured above) or the Alden unlined chukka, which is more often sold with a leather sole rather than traditional desert boot crepe.
The Church’s version drains any vintage milsurp vibe from the desert boot—Sahara are more narrowly lasted with Goodyear welting with much finer stitching that the Clarks boots. If you’re into desert boots for their mod connotations, I think the Church’s shoes fit the narrow-trousered aesthetic better than current Clarks. Note that if you have large feet, the slightly longer last and higher lacing may exaggerate that effect.
The Aldens are considered by many the perfect casual shoe. Neither too sharp nor too clunky, they’re quite comfortable and go as perfectly with denim as a good leather jacket and a plain tshirt. They’re also distinctive looking, with a double line of stitching on the  quarters, which are much less sharply angled than most chukkas/desert boots. The only drawback for me is the cost—about $500 and rarely discounted.  Ebay or other secondary markets are better bets for off price Aldens.
-Pete

Hi, I’m a big fan of the Clark desert boot. However i think it’s time to upgrade. I would like to find an option that is one step up in terms of quality and price. Do you have any suggestions?

Ah, the desert boot. The shoe that launched a thousand menswear blogs. One step up from Clarks unassailably basic desert boot (best in sand suede) is sort of a no man’s land of footwear. Clarks boots retail at $120 (although currently on sale <$100 at Need Supply). As you shop up the price ladder, styles vary a little, but quality doesn’t too much, until you get into the welted footwear makers; of course, their prices are triple the price of a pair of Clarks, or more. Some options:

  • A choice so obvious it risks being taken for granted is J. Crew’s Macalister boot. Macalisters are a little sharper and shapelier than Clarks and made in Italy of decent if not superlative soft suede. In the range between Clarks and $200, I’d pick the Macalisters. Plus they’re on sale for about $100 through May 24 with code PACKME.
  • Loake makes a desert boot that runs about $150. Loake is a Northampton-based shoe brand but their desert boots are made outside the UK in the EU. A little more interesting than the Clarks, but in my opinion, part of Clark’s appeal is their knockaround, anonymous quality. I’m borderline allergic to Loake’s darker color versions with contrast stitching.

If you’re willing and able to spend more or wait for sales, two upgraded desert boots worth buying are Church’s Sahara (pictured above) or the Alden unlined chukka, which is more often sold with a leather sole rather than traditional desert boot crepe.

  • The Church’s version drains any vintage milsurp vibe from the desert boot—Sahara are more narrowly lasted with Goodyear welting with much finer stitching that the Clarks boots. If you’re into desert boots for their mod connotations, I think the Church’s shoes fit the narrow-trousered aesthetic better than current Clarks. Note that if you have large feet, the slightly longer last and higher lacing may exaggerate that effect.
  • The Aldens are considered by many the perfect casual shoe. Neither too sharp nor too clunky, they’re quite comfortable and go as perfectly with denim as a good leather jacket and a plain tshirt. They’re also distinctive looking, with a double line of stitching on the  quarters, which are much less sharply angled than most chukkas/desert boots. The only drawback for me is the cost—about $500 and rarely discounted.  Ebay or other secondary markets are better bets for off price Aldens.

-Pete

What I Take Long Walks In
With the exception of running shoes, the most comfortable shoes I&#8217;ve worn have always been built on Plantation crepe. Crepe refers to a sort of soft rubber - usually slightly yellow-ish in color - that comes in large sheets. Shoe manufacturers take these sheets, cut them down to the size and shape necessary, and then layer them to form a sole. The result is something that&#8217;s very, very comfortable. They make you feel like you&#8217;re walking on soft clouds, or more realistically, like those big rubber pads that toddlers play on. 
The upside to crepe is that they&#8217;re comfortable, particularly on hard concrete, and look suitably stylish for spring through fall wear. The downside is that they might not last as long as a pair of hard-bottom leather soles. Still, they can still be replaced by an experienced cobbler when the time comes. I&#8217;ve also read that crepe can get rigid and crack. I don&#8217;t know if this is because of harsh weather conditions or just plain age, but for what it&#8217;s worth, that&#8217;s never happened to any of my crepe soled shoes. 
There are a number of shoe styles that are commonly made with Plantation crepe - boots, plain toe derbys, moccasins, etc. My favorites are perhaps brown suede chukkas, which I think look particularly nice with cotton trousers, casual shirts, and even the occasional soft-shouldered odd jacket. The pairing of suede and crepe makes for a particularly stylish casual combination, and you can find suede, crepe soled chukkas at a pretty wide range of price points. On the high end, A Suitable Wardrobe has my favorites - a really handsome model that looks sleek enough to be worn with grey wool trousers. For something more casual and affordable, consider Church&#8217;s Sahara, Loake&#8217;s Gobi, or Clarks&#8217; desert boots. The third retails for about $120, but it&#8217;s not hard to find them for under $100. Just Google around or check eBay. 

What I Take Long Walks In

With the exception of running shoes, the most comfortable shoes I’ve worn have always been built on Plantation crepe. Crepe refers to a sort of soft rubber - usually slightly yellow-ish in color - that comes in large sheets. Shoe manufacturers take these sheets, cut them down to the size and shape necessary, and then layer them to form a sole. The result is something that’s very, very comfortable. They make you feel like you’re walking on soft clouds, or more realistically, like those big rubber pads that toddlers play on. 

The upside to crepe is that they’re comfortable, particularly on hard concrete, and look suitably stylish for spring through fall wear. The downside is that they might not last as long as a pair of hard-bottom leather soles. Still, they can still be replaced by an experienced cobbler when the time comes. I’ve also read that crepe can get rigid and crack. I don’t know if this is because of harsh weather conditions or just plain age, but for what it’s worth, that’s never happened to any of my crepe soled shoes. 

There are a number of shoe styles that are commonly made with Plantation crepe - boots, plain toe derbys, moccasins, etc. My favorites are perhaps brown suede chukkas, which I think look particularly nice with cotton trousers, casual shirts, and even the occasional soft-shouldered odd jacket. The pairing of suede and crepe makes for a particularly stylish casual combination, and you can find suede, crepe soled chukkas at a pretty wide range of price points. On the high end, A Suitable Wardrobe has my favorites - a really handsome model that looks sleek enough to be worn with grey wool trousers. For something more casual and affordable, consider Church’s Sahara, Loake’s Gobi, or Clarks’ desert boots. The third retails for about $120, but it’s not hard to find them for under $100. Just Google around or check eBay. 

It’s On Sale: Barneys New York

The luxury retailer has dropped prices to its sale items to 40% off today. While that still makes the majority of designer-labeled clothing still really expensive, a few good deals can be found. 

Keep in mind that prices will continue to drop as the clearance sale goes on longer, but so will selection. 

Chukkas for Fall

Fall for me is about boots. Brass-buckled tan jodhpurs worn with olive moleskins; shell cordovan balmoral boots, in that perfect tone of reddish brown, worn with grey flannel trousers; and handsewn, chunky moc-toe boots worn with dark blue jeans. There are dozens of styles, but the most versatile and easy-to-wear of them all is the chukka. Brought over from India by the British Raj, these were named “chukkas” after the playing period in polo. They were quite popular in the 1940s and 1950s, and today can still be worn with a wide range of ensembles – anything from chinos to jeans to wool trousers, put together with something as dressy as a sport coat or as casual a four-pocket field jacket. They can even be worn with suits, although it’s advisable to stick with more “casual” varieties, such as ones made from flannel, linen, or tweed, rather than smooth, lightweight worsted wools.

There are number of good options to consider. For those on a budget, I recommend Loake or Meermin. Loake has two models: the Kempton, which is built on the round toe 026 last, and the Pimlico, which is built on the slightly sleeker, soft-square toe Capital. These are also available rebranded as the Harwood at Charles Trywhitt, as well as the Gosforth and Barrow from Herring. Meermin, on the other hand, has two suede models on their Rui last, which is a round toe design you can more closely inspect here. If you happen to not like the Rui, Meermin can also custom build you a chukka with any last, leather, and sole you wish for a small surcharge. Just drop them a note through their website to order. Their quality is just as good, if not considerably better once you go made-to-order, as Loake’s. 

If you’re willing to spend a little bit more money, there’s a wider range of options. Allen Edmonds, for example, has their Malvern on sale for about $250. For a few hundred dollars more, there’s a number of designs at Crockett and Jones, which you can peruse by doing a search on their website for “chukkas.” My favorite from them is probably the Brecon, a country calf leather boot built on a Dainite sole. It’s a very rustic shoe that can be successfully paired with corduroys, moleskins, and jeans. For something sleeker, check out Kent Wang, who has something similar to the Crockett and Jones’ Tetbury for about $350. Additionally, there’s this handsome shell cordovan version from Alden. If you want one, but can’t afford the price, you can have something similar made through Meermin, custom ordered, for about half the cost.

Of course, those just scratch the surface of the most basic models available. There’s also crepe rubber soled chukkas, which are an incredible pleasure to walk on. Like other well made shoes, these can last years and years if properly taken care of and given regular resolings. Simple, basic designs include Clark’s Desert Boots, Church’s Sahara, Loake’s Campden, and A Suitable Wardrobe’s Easy Fitting Chukka. For something lighter and more breathable, try ones that are unlined. Unlined chukkas lack structure around the uppers, so they feel more like slippers. Models here include Allen Edmonds’ Amok and Alden’s 1494. The Amok is noticeably sleeker, but I find more charm in Alden’s wider 1494 version. Crockett and Jones also has unlined models called the Milton and Hartland, as well as one simply named the “Chukka.” All of those are available for view on their website and for purchase through their New York City store.

Whatever you choose, I encourage you to pick up a pair (if you don’t already own some) and try wearing them this fall with jeans and tweeds, corduroys and Shetland sweaters, and wool trousers and waxed cotton coats. In a smooth brown calfskin or russet shade of suede, these can be some of the most versatile shoes you will ever own. 

Casual Summer Footwear

Like most men of my generation, I rarely wear more “formal” clothes such as dark wool suits and black oxford shoes. Much of my wardrobe consists of more casual items, though I admit it leans towards the dressier side of things. That means lots of odd trousers and sport coats, casual button-up shirts, and shoes such as derbys, boots, and slip-ons. With the passing of Memorial Day and the unofficial arrival of summer, I thought I’d review some casual footwear options for the new season. Basically things that will work with what I think most men already have in their closet.

Generally speaking, I think men tend to look smarter in a pair of leather shoes than trainers. The one exception is white sneakers during the summer. For some ensembles, such as a pair of navy chinos and a colorful madras shirt, there may be nothing better. My favorites in this category include Superga, Chuck Taylors’ All Stars, and Vans’ Authentics, but there are many others. I covered a bunch of them last year in a post about plimsolls. In addition to those, you can consider the Common Projects and German Army Trainers that Jesse has talked about, as well as Svensson’s Classic Low Whites, Superga’s 1705s, and Superga’s decks. Svensson is a bit more refined looking, like Common Projects, but comes at a lower price point and even less branding. Men of Ilk is offering a 20% off discount code right now (GLCCW49), which puts the Svenssons at $180 for American customers. As for the Supergas, I bought a pair of the 1705s a few months ago and have been really enjoying them. The branding is less obvious and the design is basic enough to pair with most things.

For something slightly dressier, you can consider chukka boots. I know boots are a bit of an odd suggestion for summer footwear, but depending on your regional climate, I think they can work quite well. Alden’s unlined suede chukka, for example, is so soft and buttery that it wears very much like a slipper. The lack of leather lining inside makes the upper more malleable and breathable, much like a canvas shoe. My friend Stephen at The Simply Refined has said everything I could say about them. For something similar, you can consider Church’s Sahara and Allen Edmonds’ Amok. The brown version of the Amok is on clearance right now for $125.

If you prefer a bit more structure in your leather chukkas, you should check out Loake’s Kempton, Sahara, and Camden. Brooks Brothers also has a suede boot that gets discounted to $130 or so at the end of every season, and there’s of course Clark’s desert boots that everyone already knows about. If you have a bit more money to spend, I would also recommend A Suitable Wardrobe’s crepe sole chukka. I really like the shape of the toe box and think the crepe sole/ suede upper combination helps underscore the casualness of the shoes.

Finally, I’ll also suggest you get a pair of loafers this summer. Like with chukkas, these can be worn mostly year round, but feel especially nice for the warmer seasons. There are a good number of styles to consider, but for the purposes of this post, I’ll stick with the classic American penny loafer. Inspired by the Norwegian moccasin, the penny loafer was the sine non-qua for the post-war “Ivy Look,” and still looks quite sharp today. I recommend getting them from American manufacturers such as Alden, Allen Edmonds, Ralph Lauren, Brooks Brothers, Rancourt, and Oak Street Bootmakers. Bass also has some, though their quality is much lower these days. Outside of American companies, you may also want to look into Markowski, Herring, and Loake, as well as some of the models that Crockett & Jones offers.

Of course, there are dozens of good causal footwear styles, and some may be better suited for warm weather conditions than the ones above (e.g. espadrilles, white bucks, and spectators). However, for good, versatile basics that can work well for summer and transition into fall, I think you’d do well with white sneakers, suede chukkas, and leather penny loafers. 

It&#8217;s On Ebay
Church&#8217;s Spectator Wingtips
How great are these Church&#8217;s spectators?  They&#8217;d look great in the summer with a cream-colored suit.  More shoes for your spring lunch on the White House lawn.
Starts at $80.99, ends Monday

It’s On Ebay

Church’s Spectator Wingtips

How great are these Church’s spectators?  They’d look great in the summer with a cream-colored suit.  More shoes for your spring lunch on the White House lawn.

Starts at $80.99, ends Monday