Redditor daou0782 explains the difference between a $450 black t-shirt from Rick Owens and a $5 black t-shirt from Hanes. He then talks about the importance of details, and how there are two ways to appreciate clothing: clothes as means-to-an-end, and clothes as an end in itself. I don’t wear long, drapey, black tees, and wouldn’t pay $450 for one, but daou0782’s post is pretty interesting and sensible. 
(Note, this is the third Rick Owens post at Put This On in the last two weeks, which is kind of strange.)

Redditor daou0782 explains the difference between a $450 black t-shirt from Rick Owens and a $5 black t-shirt from Hanes. He then talks about the importance of details, and how there are two ways to appreciate clothing: clothes as means-to-an-end, and clothes as an end in itself. I don’t wear long, drapey, black tees, and wouldn’t pay $450 for one, but daou0782’s post is pretty interesting and sensible. 

(Note, this is the third Rick Owens post at Put This On in the last two weeks, which is kind of strange.)

"When I started designing shoes in late 1985, athletic shoes were just basic performance footwear. There was no romance, no tying in with athletic personalities, no design inspiration from outside. They were just done for sports. Then Nike came on the scene." - Tinker Hatfield
A fascinating little history of the Air Jordan at the Cooper-Hewitt’s Object of the Day blog.
(Above: Hatfield’s original design for the Air Jordan XIII)

"When I started designing shoes in late 1985, athletic shoes were just basic performance footwear. There was no romance, no tying in with athletic personalities, no design inspiration from outside. They were just done for sports. Then Nike came on the scene." - Tinker Hatfield

A fascinating little history of the Air Jordan at the Cooper-Hewitt’s Object of the Day blog.

(Above: Hatfield’s original design for the Air Jordan XIII)

My mother has a booth in Stuff, a wonderful mostly mid-century shop in San Francisco. The prices are very reasonable and the selection is tremendous. Check out this review of the place at DeeDee914, and if you’re in the Yay Area, stop in. My mom’s booth is right in the middle - that’s her red display case in the photo.
Stuff - 150 Valencia Street at Duboce - San Francisco

My mother has a booth in Stuff, a wonderful mostly mid-century shop in San Francisco. The prices are very reasonable and the selection is tremendous. Check out this review of the place at DeeDee914, and if you’re in the Yay Area, stop in. My mom’s booth is right in the middle - that’s her red display case in the photo.

Stuff - 150 Valencia Street at Duboce - San Francisco

Starting next week, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art will host “Less And More: The Design Ethos of Dieter Rams.” If you’re not already familiar with his work, Rams has run design for Braun for more than 40 years, and helped define contemporary design with his “10 Principles of Good Design.” The show will featured hundreds of Rams-designed objects, and objects influenced by Rams’ principles. Not to be missed.

Starting next week, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art will host “Less And More: The Design Ethos of Dieter Rams.” If you’re not already familiar with his work, Rams has run design for Braun for more than 40 years, and helped define contemporary design with his “10 Principles of Good Design.” The show will featured hundreds of Rams-designed objects, and objects influenced by Rams’ principles. Not to be missed.

“The aesthetic quality of a product is integral to its usefulness because products used every day have an effect on people and their well-being.” — Dieter Rams

99% Invisible - New Design Show

99percentinvisible:

Roman Mars is one of the most admired producers in public radio.  You might not know his work, though he’s produced stuff on lots of the best public radio outlets.  He’s sort of a secret guru - a guy people come to when they want help creating something amazing and cutting-edge and most of all not boring.  As a second-rate public radio producer myself, I have nothing but admiration for the work he does.

He’s recently started producing a new series about design and architecture called 99% Invisible.  The pieces are about five minutes long, and they’re a fascinating window into something that shapes our lives every day in a thousand different ways.  You can use this link to subscribe to the podcast (free) in iTunes.

When working with a lathe, always wear a neck scarf.  Always.
(From a beautiful film on the design process at Walter Landor & Associates in the 1960s.)
(Thanks, Conor)

When working with a lathe, always wear a neck scarf.  Always.

(From a beautiful film on the design process at Walter Landor & Associates in the 1960s.)

(Thanks, Conor)