A Course in Advanced Tie Knots
Here is all you need to know about “advanced” tie knots: they are useless and you shouldn’t wear them.
Above is the absurdly dumb “Eldredge Knot,” but it’s far from the only offender. Rarely does a week go by where I don’t end up with an email about Pratt knots or Winchester knots or Dubble Bubble knots or some other goofy stuff.
Here’s a summary of useful tie knots:
The Four in Hand
The old around-around-behind-over-through. The classic four in hand knot is simple, easy to tie, holds a dimple well, and is appropriate for any situation. It is slightly asymmetrical, which is desirable. It is more flattering to most men, more relaxed and more distinctive. Really the only time this knot isn’t suitable is with a very skinny, insubstantial tie.
The Double Four in Hand
This is the four in hand knot with an added wrap-around, as seen in this video by our friend GW. Useful if you are shorter and need to use up some extra length from an off-the-rack tie, or if you prefer a slightly fuller knot. I use it once in a while to give more structure to the knot of a knit tie.
The Half Windsor
If you’re one of those people who insists on symmetry, go ahead and use the half Windsor (or the Pratt, I guess). Just know that none of the Windsors ever wore the Windsor, half or otherwise. They wear the four in hand for the reasons outlined above. And look better because of it. (The full Windsor should be the exclusive province of Donald Trump and former NFL stars and other people whose goal is to look like a jerk.)
Everything Else
Is silly bullshit.

A Course in Advanced Tie Knots

Here is all you need to know about “advanced” tie knots: they are useless and you shouldn’t wear them.

Above is the absurdly dumb “Eldredge Knot,” but it’s far from the only offender. Rarely does a week go by where I don’t end up with an email about Pratt knots or Winchester knots or Dubble Bubble knots or some other goofy stuff.

Here’s a summary of useful tie knots:

The Four in Hand

The old around-around-behind-over-through. The classic four in hand knot is simple, easy to tie, holds a dimple well, and is appropriate for any situation. It is slightly asymmetrical, which is desirable. It is more flattering to most men, more relaxed and more distinctive. Really the only time this knot isn’t suitable is with a very skinny, insubstantial tie.

The Double Four in Hand

This is the four in hand knot with an added wrap-around, as seen in this video by our friend GW. Useful if you are shorter and need to use up some extra length from an off-the-rack tie, or if you prefer a slightly fuller knot. I use it once in a while to give more structure to the knot of a knit tie.

The Half Windsor

If you’re one of those people who insists on symmetry, go ahead and use the half Windsor (or the Pratt, I guess). Just know that none of the Windsors ever wore the Windsor, half or otherwise. They wear the four in hand for the reasons outlined above. And look better because of it. (The full Windsor should be the exclusive province of Donald Trump and former NFL stars and other people whose goal is to look like a jerk.)

Everything Else

Is silly bullshit.

A dimple is certainly not required when wearing a tie, but I think it usually looks better with than without. Generally speaking, the higher quality the tie, the better the dimple. That’s because the materials used, both for the outer shell and inside lining, will affect how well the tie will curve.
I’ve also found that many times, though not always, a better dimple can be produced using the double four-in-hand knot, like you see here on our friend Mistah Wong. Whether you can use this knot depends on how high your trousers are and how long your tie hangs. You always want both ends of the tie to be no further than three inches or so apart from each other, and for the front blade to end at about the middle of your belt. Obviously, these things don’t have to be exact, but those are the general guidelines, and you may not want to have the tie end at your sternum just for the sake of having a nicer dimple. Unless you’re Bryan Ferry, anyway. 
(Photo above by Most Exerent)

A dimple is certainly not required when wearing a tie, but I think it usually looks better with than without. Generally speaking, the higher quality the tie, the better the dimple. That’s because the materials used, both for the outer shell and inside lining, will affect how well the tie will curve.

I’ve also found that many times, though not always, a better dimple can be produced using the double four-in-hand knot, like you see here on our friend Mistah Wong. Whether you can use this knot depends on how high your trousers are and how long your tie hangs. You always want both ends of the tie to be no further than three inches or so apart from each other, and for the front blade to end at about the middle of your belt. Obviously, these things don’t have to be exact, but those are the general guidelines, and you may not want to have the tie end at your sternum just for the sake of having a nicer dimple. Unless you’re Bryan Ferry, anyway. 

(Photo above by Most Exerent)