It’s On Sale: Jonathan + Olivia

Toronto shop Jonathan + Olivia has marked down most of its spring summer merchandise in the area of 50 percent off. J+O is a longtime Engineered Garments stockist and still has some of my favorites from this season in stock, as well as very wearable stuff from brands like French Trotters (I believe J+O is only North American stockist for this Parisian line), Acne, and Wings + Horns, plus lines that push the envelope a little more like Perks and Mini. This is not the best opportunity for shoppers outside of North America to buy a tshirt; J+O ships at a flat rate of $15 within Canada and $25 to the United States; rates are significantly higher for European and Asian destinations.

-Pete

Real People: Fatigue Pants
Of course, we all read Put This On, so all of our pants are perfectly tailored: Fitted in the waist, slim through the thigh, draping elegantly down our calves to end in an ideal break over our frankly breathtaking (hand-welted) shoes. But when I need a break from worrying about breaks, it can be comforting to pull on a pair of pants designed for utility. Military-style, olive drab fatigue pants are probably not the most often re-purposed surplus gear (M-65s take that prize), but they are exceedingly wearable. They’re an interesting alternative to plain cotton khakis (also military derived) for wear with plaid shirts and worn-in shoes, like Daiki Suzuki of Engineered Garments, and can even be reasonably swapped in for more formal trousers if you’re in a position to be a little subversive, like Gary Drinkwater, pictured in his shop in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Gary’s colors are neutral and well-balanced, and he looks relaxed rather than sloppy, which can be a concern with fatigues, especially surplus versions.
Such pants can be found vintage in a number of models: pants from the OG-107 U.S. military work uniform (standard issue for the second half of the 20th century; OG-107 really designates the color, olive gray); M-1951 cargo pants; or more recent Battle Dress Uniform (BDU) trousers. They are best purchased in person because the sizing varied over the years and many if not most pants were altered after issuance, so actual measurements may not match tagged sizes. Although fatigues can sometimes be tailored to fit trimly, the bagginess is in my opinion the interesting aspect and on its own is “different” enough—pinrolling can help narrow them at the ankle. Camouflage patterns are best left to the military or utility purposes around the house, like yardwork.
Gary’s pants were purchased new, from Engineered Garments sub-brand Workaday (I have a pair from Workaday myself, as well as a couple of vintage pairs). Daiki Suzuki has offered a pair in his collection nearly every season for years, but they vary in fabric and cut—some are trimmer than others, and spring/summer versions are lighter weight. They’re currently available at Engineered Garments stockists like Drinkwaters or Mohawk General Store.
-Pete

Real People: Fatigue Pants

Of course, we all read Put This On, so all of our pants are perfectly tailored: Fitted in the waist, slim through the thigh, draping elegantly down our calves to end in an ideal break over our frankly breathtaking (hand-welted) shoes. But when I need a break from worrying about breaks, it can be comforting to pull on a pair of pants designed for utility. Military-style, olive drab fatigue pants are probably not the most often re-purposed surplus gear (M-65s take that prize), but they are exceedingly wearable. They’re an interesting alternative to plain cotton khakis (also military derived) for wear with plaid shirts and worn-in shoes, like Daiki Suzuki of Engineered Garments, and can even be reasonably swapped in for more formal trousers if you’re in a position to be a little subversive, like Gary Drinkwater, pictured in his shop in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Gary’s colors are neutral and well-balanced, and he looks relaxed rather than sloppy, which can be a concern with fatigues, especially surplus versions.

Such pants can be found vintage in a number of models: pants from the OG-107 U.S. military work uniform (standard issue for the second half of the 20th century; OG-107 really designates the color, olive gray); M-1951 cargo pants; or more recent Battle Dress Uniform (BDU) trousers. They are best purchased in person because the sizing varied over the years and many if not most pants were altered after issuance, so actual measurements may not match tagged sizes. Although fatigues can sometimes be tailored to fit trimly, the bagginess is in my opinion the interesting aspect and on its own is “different” enough—pinrolling can help narrow them at the ankle. Camouflage patterns are best left to the military or utility purposes around the house, like yardwork.

Gary’s pants were purchased new, from Engineered Garments sub-brand Workaday (I have a pair from Workaday myself, as well as a couple of vintage pairs). Daiki Suzuki has offered a pair in his collection nearly every season for years, but they vary in fabric and cut—some are trimmer than others, and spring/summer versions are lighter weight. They’re currently available at Engineered Garments stockists like Drinkwaters or Mohawk General Store.

-Pete

It’s on Sale: Barney’s

Barney’s has added more items to its sale and dropped prices on stuff already on sale, discounting some things to 60% off. Although items like this Perfecto by Schott leather jacket or these Viberg boots are still far from inexpensive, they’re exceedingly well-made and handsome pieces in normal colors that don’t often last at deep discount. Also worth a look: Ovadia & Sons shirts, Zimmerli underwear, Drake’s accessories, Crockett and Jones shoes, and a surprisingly large selection of Engineered Garments.

-Pete

A Popover for Summer
The spate of hot weather recently had me thinking about what kind of shirts I might like to get this summer. High on the list are popovers. A popover is a woven shirt with a placket that only goes partially down the chest. I suspect they’re a holdover from when sport shirts weren’t all made with coat fronts (an early version of such a design can be seen here). They’re less common now, but I think they can look quite good on men with slim stomachs. They’re more relaxed than a traditional shirt, but more dressed up than a polo shirt, and this in-between-ness makes them just right for when you want to look smart on casual days.
I bought this one from Gant two years ago, but sadly the cut didn’t work out for me, so now I’m on the market for another. The nicest one I’ve seen is by Isaia, which is pictured above. My friend Agyesh, who actually took the image shown, works for Isaia and tells me that the brand still makes these. They should be available at Saks Fifth Avenue (especially the one in New York City), but if not, any store that offers Isaia’s made-to-measure program will be able to custom make one for you. You can get the model above, or one with a button-down collar and mitered placket. 
In addition, Sid Mashburn has some very handsome ones with a deep, long placket. Epaulet, New England Shirt Company, and Wharf also look promising. 
For something a bit more fashion forward, there’s a small selection at Need Supply, and a few designs by Engineered Garments this season at French Garment Cleaners and Oi Polloi. Steven Alan happens to have one of them on sale, which you can knock another 15% off by signing up for their newsletter. For something a bit more workwear-ish, check out Thoroughstitch and Levis Vintage Clothing.
All the aforementioned companies make really nice shirts, but they can be a bit expensive. If you want something more affordable, and don’t mind short-sleeves, J Crew has a bunch on sale right now. You can take 30% off the listed price by punching in the code SUMMER at checkout.
And finally, for people who need a special size, there are a number of options for custom. In addition to the Isaia you see above, Individualized Shirts and Mercer & Sons have made-to-order programs. They’re not exactly made-to-measure, meaning you can’t get things made to your exact measurements, but you can choose from different cuts and patterns to get the shirt you need (for Individualized, you’ll have to go to their factory, however). Luxire also makes them through an online made-to-measure service, and I can recommend my shirtmaker Ascot Chang for bespoke. Ascot Chang is actually running a promotion right now where you can get one shirt free for every six you order. Granted, they’re not cheap – so buying six at a time is pretty expensive – but they do fantastic work and offer tremendous value at their price point. You can visit them at one of their stores, or catch them on their US tour this month. 
(Photo credit: Mad House, Inc)

A Popover for Summer

The spate of hot weather recently had me thinking about what kind of shirts I might like to get this summer. High on the list are popovers. A popover is a woven shirt with a placket that only goes partially down the chest. I suspect they’re a holdover from when sport shirts weren’t all made with coat fronts (an early version of such a design can be seen here). They’re less common now, but I think they can look quite good on men with slim stomachs. They’re more relaxed than a traditional shirt, but more dressed up than a polo shirt, and this in-between-ness makes them just right for when you want to look smart on casual days.

I bought this one from Gant two years ago, but sadly the cut didn’t work out for me, so now I’m on the market for another. The nicest one I’ve seen is by Isaia, which is pictured above. My friend Agyesh, who actually took the image shown, works for Isaia and tells me that the brand still makes these. They should be available at Saks Fifth Avenue (especially the one in New York City), but if not, any store that offers Isaia’s made-to-measure program will be able to custom make one for you. You can get the model above, or one with a button-down collar and mitered placket. 

In addition, Sid Mashburn has some very handsome ones with a deep, long placket. EpauletNew England Shirt Company, and Wharf also look promising. 

For something a bit more fashion forward, there’s a small selection at Need Supply, and a few designs by Engineered Garments this season at French Garment Cleaners and Oi PolloiSteven Alan happens to have one of them on sale, which you can knock another 15% off by signing up for their newsletter. For something a bit more workwear-ish, check out Thoroughstitch and Levis Vintage Clothing.

All the aforementioned companies make really nice shirts, but they can be a bit expensive. If you want something more affordable, and don’t mind short-sleeves, J Crew has a bunch on sale right now. You can take 30% off the listed price by punching in the code SUMMER at checkout.

And finally, for people who need a special size, there are a number of options for custom. In addition to the Isaia you see above, Individualized Shirts and Mercer & Sons have made-to-order programs. They’re not exactly made-to-measure, meaning you can’t get things made to your exact measurements, but you can choose from different cuts and patterns to get the shirt you need (for Individualized, you’ll have to go to their factory, however). Luxire also makes them through an online made-to-measure service, and I can recommend my shirtmaker Ascot Chang for bespoke. Ascot Chang is actually running a promotion right now where you can get one shirt free for every six you order. Granted, they’re not cheap – so buying six at a time is pretty expensive – but they do fantastic work and offer tremendous value at their price point. You can visit them at one of their stores, or catch them on their US tour this month. 

(Photo credit: Mad House, Inc)

The Transitional Shirt Jacket

The weather’s still pretty chilly where I live, but in a month’s time, it’ll hit those cool temperatures that’ll remind us summer’s not too far away. If you have a very casual American sense of style, a good garment to rely on for such transitional periods is the shirt jacket. The term “shirt jacket” can be pretty nebulous. I’ve seen Italians use it to refer to things many would just consider outerwear. Here in the States, however, it commonly refers to shirts that fit like jackets, and have a certain outdoorsy, workwearish, lumberjack-y feel. They’re not for everyone, to be sure, but if you want something very casual to wear with jeans and boots, these can be fairly useful on casual nights while strolling through the neighborhood.

The most well known in this field is probably Pendleton’s board shirt, which from my experience fits kind of baggy, but you can have a tailor take in the sides a bit. Filson’s Jac-Shirt is somewhat similar, but is made from a more substantial cloth. For something a bit more “fashionable,” you can consider Apolis, Orlebar Brown, Barbour, and United. Engineered Garments and Woolrich Woolen Mills can also usually be relied on for good options, although this season, I’ve only seen ones made from shinier fabrics (which may or may not suit your style). I also like Aspesi’s many takes on classic military designs. They’re slimmer fitting than what you’d typically find in military surplus store, and while they’re inspired by military garments, they won’t leave you looking like Robert De Niro from the film Taxi Driver.

All of these brands are a bit expensive, but they’ll come down 50% or more by the end of the season. If you’d like something more affordable now, there’s Club Monaco and Penfield. The second is particularly good to check in with every once in a while if you’re on a tight budget and in need of some outerwear.

Another option is to just use a moleskin or chamois shirt as a layering piece. LL Bean’s mainline has a very well priced one, and it fits surprisingly well. I’m a size 36 chest and fit nicely into their extra-small. My only complaint is the tonal buttons, but you can easily swap those out to something more agreeable if you’d like. Filson also seems to have a nice moleskins option, though I’ve never tried it. If you’d like something slimmer, you can try LL Bean Signature’s chamois shirt. The cloth isn’t as heavy or thick as their mainline chamois, and the cut is considerably shorter, but it could give a slightly more fashionable look to someone with a slim build. Epaulet also has a really nice looking moleskin jacket, though I admit I think people should at least give the LL Bean’s moleskin shirt a spin before they jump on a pricier option.

It’s On Sale
Jil Sander Linen Scarf
$55 from $89 at Yoox
Yoox is having their Spring-Summer sale. Not the bonanza it has sometimes been in the past, but some interesting stuff. This Black Fleece shirt, which I own and love, for example. Or this Aquacscutum raincoat, these Incotex pants, this Engineered Garments casual jacket, or this Loro Piana coat. Plus tons of Boglioli sportcoats in the $150-200 range.
To help, I clicked off the more PTO-approved brands in the sale - use this link to reach them.

It’s On Sale

Jil Sander Linen Scarf

$55 from $89 at Yoox

Yoox is having their Spring-Summer sale. Not the bonanza it has sometimes been in the past, but some interesting stuff. This Black Fleece shirt, which I own and love, for example. Or this Aquacscutum raincoat, these Incotex pants, this Engineered Garments casual jacket, or this Loro Piana coat. Plus tons of Boglioli sportcoats in the $150-200 range.

To help, I clicked off the more PTO-approved brands in the sale - use this link to reach them.