Corduroys and Chinos
One of my favorite looks for fall is combining a dark brown corduroy sport coat with a casual pair of chinos, especially with an open collared, plaid shirt, like you see above. The chinos should probably be khaki colored, but olive could work just as well. The shirt can also be an OCBD, chamois, flannel, or some other kind of brushed cotton. The key is to get something that’s heavy and rough enough to visually hold its own against the corduroy. For shoes, I recommend a dark brown pair of loafers, chukkas, or plain-toe derbys. I would personally opt for plain calf, but if you wanted more texture, you could reach for suede or pebble grained leathers. 
The best thing about corduroy and chinos is that, like with good denim and tweed, they only get better with age. Corduroy sport coats, for example, look best when they’ve developed that uneven wear from years of repeated use, and causal chinos are much nicer once they’ve softened up with age. This makes them perfect for guys who don’t like to fuss too much over their clothes. So long as you make sure they fit well, you can wear them hard and feel assured that any use will just add to their value. When well-aged, corduroys and chinos have a great way of conveying a relaxed, nonchalant sense of style, which in my opinion is the best kind. 
Plus, their combination just expresses fall very well. As seen here on Woody Allen. 

Corduroys and Chinos

One of my favorite looks for fall is combining a dark brown corduroy sport coat with a casual pair of chinos, especially with an open collared, plaid shirt, like you see above. The chinos should probably be khaki colored, but olive could work just as well. The shirt can also be an OCBD, chamois, flannel, or some other kind of brushed cotton. The key is to get something that’s heavy and rough enough to visually hold its own against the corduroy. For shoes, I recommend a dark brown pair of loafers, chukkas, or plain-toe derbys. I would personally opt for plain calf, but if you wanted more texture, you could reach for suede or pebble grained leathers. 

The best thing about corduroy and chinos is that, like with good denim and tweed, they only get better with age. Corduroy sport coats, for example, look best when they’ve developed that uneven wear from years of repeated use, and causal chinos are much nicer once they’ve softened up with age. This makes them perfect for guys who don’t like to fuss too much over their clothes. So long as you make sure they fit well, you can wear them hard and feel assured that any use will just add to their value. When well-aged, corduroys and chinos have a great way of conveying a relaxed, nonchalant sense of style, which in my opinion is the best kind. 

Plus, their combination just expresses fall very well. As seen here on Woody Allen. 

Linen Sweaters

Linen sweaters can be very useful in the fall. They add an extra layer of protection without wearing too warm, making them perfect for days that range from chilly to cool. Cotton sweaters do this as well, of course, but every cotton sweater I’ve owned has lost its shape too easily. The body and sleeves bag after a while, cuffs lose their elasticity, and wrinkles get set into the elbows. Fine for sweatshirts, but less ideal if you want something dressier.  

That leaves linen, which I’ve been wearing on weekends. The Bay Area’s weather has this annoying tendency to not be so chilly in the afternoon that you’d need a sweater, but as soon as nightfall comes, you quickly wish you had one. So I’ve been wearing my linen sweater on days like these, which has kept me comfortable in both the afternoons and evenings.

In addition, I’ve found that linen can add a bit of texture to an otherwise unremarkable ensemble. For example, in the photo above, I have my brown leather jacket, light blue cotton shirt, and grey flannel trousers. Put together, there’s perhaps too much reliance on solid colors, but once you add the rougher texture of a linen sweater, you add a little subtle variation where there needs to be. (Granted, my own pictures don’t show this texture off very well, but the last image, taken from A Suitable Wardrobe, does).

Unfortunately, there aren’t many places that make, or even sell, linen sweaters. The best I know of is Inis Meain. Where you’d think linen can bag over time, Inis Meain’s version holds up just as good as the best merinos and lambswools. You can buy one from A Suitable Wardrobe. In the past, they’ve also manufactured them for Ben Silver and JL Powell, but those retailers are not selling them at the moment. For something more affordable, check Brooks Brothers, Land’s End, and Club Monaco. Those are unfortunately linen-cotton blends, which makes me suspect they won’t hold their shape as well over time, but on the upside, they’re also a fraction of the price. You can also find linen-cotton blend sweaters at Ralph Lauren, though they don’t seem to stock any recommendable ones this season. Ebay may have some from previous years, but you’ll want to avoid the flimsy, loosely knit, baggy variety. A discerning eye and some patience should land you something good. 

Love this picture of Giuseppe from An Affordable Wardrobe enjoying the autumn. Menswear dads!

Love this picture of Giuseppe from An Affordable Wardrobe enjoying the autumn. Menswear dads!

marcguyot:

Details.

French clothing genius/madman Marc Guyot has a tumblr. It is essentially a compendium of Sartorial Power Moves.

voxsart:

Fall/Winter Day Shirtings, According To Flusser.
For evening?  White, of course.

Simply a useful guide.

voxsart:

Fall/Winter Day Shirtings, According To Flusser.

For evening?  White, of course.

Simply a useful guide.

Fall is Coming
Just picked up the first few of our next round of Put This On Gentlemen’s Association pocket squares. English silk; distinctly autumnal.
There’s still a week to sign up for this round. Our squares are quite literally hand-made; cut by hand and sewn by hand in Los Angeles. Because our manufacture is in-house, and we have no retail partners, we’re able to offer them for dramatically less than you’d pay in a fine men’s store.
If you want to join us, or give a membership as a gift, you can do so here.

Fall is Coming

Just picked up the first few of our next round of Put This On Gentlemen’s Association pocket squares. English silk; distinctly autumnal.

There’s still a week to sign up for this round. Our squares are quite literally hand-made; cut by hand and sewn by hand in Los Angeles. Because our manufacture is in-house, and we have no retail partners, we’re able to offer them for dramatically less than you’d pay in a fine men’s store.

If you want to join us, or give a membership as a gift, you can do so here.

Green Corduroys for Fall
I’m personally not one for unusual trousers. Some men can pull off loud colors and vivid patterns with aplomb, but they’re few and far between, and I’m not one of them. The one exception I make, however, are green corduroys in the fall.
If you’re just getting your first pair of corduroys, I recommend ones in a dark shade of russet brown. These can be successfully worn with almost any kind of autumnal clothing you can imagine – grey shawl collar cardigans, green waxed cotton Barbour jackets, navy flannel shirts, and brown suede shoes. They’ll be soft, comfortable, and a touch warm.
If you’re getting your second pair, I recommend wheat. Anything that resembles something like the muted color on your standard pair of chinos to ones that are just a touch more golden. If you hit the right shade, and be sure not to veer into something too yellow, these should be about as easy to wear as your dark brown pair.
Once you’re on your third, however, I suggest considering green - something like British racing green or olive. These are slightly more daring colors, but still feel reasonably conservative. Like dark brown and wheat, green is an earthy color that feels very seasonally appropriate in the fall. I wear mine with navy or grey sweaters, the kind with a very heavy texture such as Shetland or lambswool, or with a gun club sport coat, pale blue oxford cloth shirt, and brown slip on shoes, like you see above.
If you’ve never bought corduroys before, take care in paying attention to the size of the wales. These are the ribs that make up the fabric’s signature texture. Something with thicker, more widely spaced, plush wales will look a bit more old-fashioned; something very fine will look close to velvet. A mid-sized wale is a safe bet, though I don’t think there’s anything wrong with wide wales either. Those will look quite comfortable and traditional, and if you don’t wear them in an overly baggy cut, they won’t look too frumpy. My green corduroys are somewhat wide waled, actually, and cut on the fuller side of slim. Corduroys are of course a country garment, but in green I think they’re especially rustic. Country clothes, in my opinion, always look better when they’re cut slightly fuller than city clothes. 
You can pick up decent corduroys at any number of places. Cordings, Pakeman, and Hoggs of Fife have very nice traditionally cut models, while Epaulet’s and Howard Yount’s will run slim. There’s also Ralph Lauren and Brooks Brothers, who will have different models for different fits. The upside to them is that you’re more likely to live near one of their stores, so you can check out their products in person. However, I’ve also found that the other suppliers are happy to give you measurements if you enquire. 
(As an aside, if you haven’t read Jesse’s address to the Corduroy Appreciation Club, you really ought to read it. It stands out in my mind as one of the funniest clothing-related things I’ve ever come across. Corduroy Now, Corduroy Forever!) 

Green Corduroys for Fall

I’m personally not one for unusual trousers. Some men can pull off loud colors and vivid patterns with aplomb, but they’re few and far between, and I’m not one of them. The one exception I make, however, are green corduroys in the fall.

If you’re just getting your first pair of corduroys, I recommend ones in a dark shade of russet brown. These can be successfully worn with almost any kind of autumnal clothing you can imagine – grey shawl collar cardigans, green waxed cotton Barbour jackets, navy flannel shirts, and brown suede shoes. They’ll be soft, comfortable, and a touch warm.

If you’re getting your second pair, I recommend wheat. Anything that resembles something like the muted color on your standard pair of chinos to ones that are just a touch more golden. If you hit the right shade, and be sure not to veer into something too yellow, these should be about as easy to wear as your dark brown pair.

Once you’re on your third, however, I suggest considering green - something like British racing green or olive. These are slightly more daring colors, but still feel reasonably conservative. Like dark brown and wheat, green is an earthy color that feels very seasonally appropriate in the fall. I wear mine with navy or grey sweaters, the kind with a very heavy texture such as Shetland or lambswool, or with a gun club sport coat, pale blue oxford cloth shirt, and brown slip on shoes, like you see above.

If you’ve never bought corduroys before, take care in paying attention to the size of the wales. These are the ribs that make up the fabric’s signature texture. Something with thicker, more widely spaced, plush wales will look a bit more old-fashioned; something very fine will look close to velvet. A mid-sized wale is a safe bet, though I don’t think there’s anything wrong with wide wales either. Those will look quite comfortable and traditional, and if you don’t wear them in an overly baggy cut, they won’t look too frumpy. My green corduroys are somewhat wide waled, actually, and cut on the fuller side of slim. Corduroys are of course a country garment, but in green I think they’re especially rustic. Country clothes, in my opinion, always look better when they’re cut slightly fuller than city clothes. 

You can pick up decent corduroys at any number of places. Cordings, Pakeman, and Hoggs of Fife have very nice traditionally cut models, while Epaulet’s and Howard Yount’s will run slim. There’s also Ralph Lauren and Brooks Brothers, who will have different models for different fits. The upside to them is that you’re more likely to live near one of their stores, so you can check out their products in person. However, I’ve also found that the other suppliers are happy to give you measurements if you enquire. 

(As an aside, if you haven’t read Jesse’s address to the Corduroy Appreciation Club, you really ought to read it. It stands out in my mind as one of the funniest clothing-related things I’ve ever come across. Corduroy Now, Corduroy Forever!) 

Thinking of Fall
This portrait of William Eggleston, shot by Maude Schuyler Clay, embodies everything that’s beautiful about fall. Notice the 3/2 roll tweed with faint overpane check; the light blue, candy striped OCBD; and the grey crewneck sweater, most likely made from a hairy Shetland wool. These three fabrics - tweed, oxford cotton, and Shetland wool - pair well in their roughness, giving the ensemble a nicely tailored, but still casual, look. Below he could be wearing something equally textured and casual, such as dark chocolate brown corduroys with suede chukka boots, or perhaps a heavy pair of khaki chinos, ones where the diagonal weave is easily visible, and some shell cordovan wingtips. This to me is fall. 
Oh, and the faux-tortiseshell glasses are a nice touch. Something I’ve been wanting for a bugger long time. 

Thinking of Fall

This portrait of William Eggleston, shot by Maude Schuyler Clay, embodies everything that’s beautiful about fall. Notice the 3/2 roll tweed with faint overpane check; the light blue, candy striped OCBD; and the grey crewneck sweater, most likely made from a hairy Shetland wool. These three fabrics - tweed, oxford cotton, and Shetland wool - pair well in their roughness, giving the ensemble a nicely tailored, but still casual, look. Below he could be wearing something equally textured and casual, such as dark chocolate brown corduroys with suede chukka boots, or perhaps a heavy pair of khaki chinos, ones where the diagonal weave is easily visible, and some shell cordovan wingtips. This to me is fall. 

Oh, and the faux-tortiseshell glasses are a nice touch. Something I’ve been wanting for a bugger long time. 

Chukkas for Fall

Fall for me is about boots. Brass-buckled tan jodhpurs worn with olive moleskins; shell cordovan balmoral boots, in that perfect tone of reddish brown, worn with grey flannel trousers; and handsewn, chunky moc-toe boots worn with dark blue jeans. There are dozens of styles, but the most versatile and easy-to-wear of them all is the chukka. Brought over from India by the British Raj, these were named “chukkas” after the playing period in polo. They were quite popular in the 1940s and 1950s, and today can still be worn with a wide range of ensembles – anything from chinos to jeans to wool trousers, put together with something as dressy as a sport coat or as casual a four-pocket field jacket. They can even be worn with suits, although it’s advisable to stick with more “casual” varieties, such as ones made from flannel, linen, or tweed, rather than smooth, lightweight worsted wools.

There are number of good options to consider. For those on a budget, I recommend Loake or Meermin. Loake has two models: the Kempton, which is built on the round toe 026 last, and the Pimlico, which is built on the slightly sleeker, soft-square toe Capital. These are also available rebranded as the Harwood at Charles Trywhitt, as well as the Gosforth and Barrow from Herring. Meermin, on the other hand, has two suede models on their Rui last, which is a round toe design you can more closely inspect here. If you happen to not like the Rui, Meermin can also custom build you a chukka with any last, leather, and sole you wish for a small surcharge. Just drop them a note through their website to order. Their quality is just as good, if not considerably better once you go made-to-order, as Loake’s. 

If you’re willing to spend a little bit more money, there’s a wider range of options. Allen Edmonds, for example, has their Malvern on sale for about $250. For a few hundred dollars more, there’s a number of designs at Crockett and Jones, which you can peruse by doing a search on their website for “chukkas.” My favorite from them is probably the Brecon, a country calf leather boot built on a Dainite sole. It’s a very rustic shoe that can be successfully paired with corduroys, moleskins, and jeans. For something sleeker, check out Kent Wang, who has something similar to the Crockett and Jones’ Tetbury for about $350. Additionally, there’s this handsome shell cordovan version from Alden. If you want one, but can’t afford the price, you can have something similar made through Meermin, custom ordered, for about half the cost.

Of course, those just scratch the surface of the most basic models available. There’s also crepe rubber soled chukkas, which are an incredible pleasure to walk on. Like other well made shoes, these can last years and years if properly taken care of and given regular resolings. Simple, basic designs include Clark’s Desert Boots, Church’s Sahara, Loake’s Campden, and A Suitable Wardrobe’s Easy Fitting Chukka. For something lighter and more breathable, try ones that are unlined. Unlined chukkas lack structure around the uppers, so they feel more like slippers. Models here include Allen Edmonds’ Amok and Alden’s 1494. The Amok is noticeably sleeker, but I find more charm in Alden’s wider 1494 version. Crockett and Jones also has unlined models called the Milton and Hartland, as well as one simply named the “Chukka.” All of those are available for view on their website and for purchase through their New York City store.

Whatever you choose, I encourage you to pick up a pair (if you don’t already own some) and try wearing them this fall with jeans and tweeds, corduroys and Shetland sweaters, and wool trousers and waxed cotton coats. In a smooth brown calfskin or russet shade of suede, these can be some of the most versatile shoes you will ever own. 

Is it bad that I’m already thinking about Fall?

Some beautiful photographs of Holland and Sherry tweeds here and here.