marcguyot:

Details.

French clothing genius/madman Marc Guyot has a tumblr. It is essentially a compendium of Sartorial Power Moves.

voxsart:

Fall/Winter Day Shirtings, According To Flusser.
For evening?  White, of course.

Simply a useful guide.

voxsart:

Fall/Winter Day Shirtings, According To Flusser.

For evening?  White, of course.

Simply a useful guide.

Fall is Coming
Just picked up the first few of our next round of Put This On Gentlemen’s Association pocket squares. English silk; distinctly autumnal.
There’s still a week to sign up for this round. Our squares are quite literally hand-made; cut by hand and sewn by hand in Los Angeles. Because our manufacture is in-house, and we have no retail partners, we’re able to offer them for dramatically less than you’d pay in a fine men’s store.
If you want to join us, or give a membership as a gift, you can do so here.

Fall is Coming

Just picked up the first few of our next round of Put This On Gentlemen’s Association pocket squares. English silk; distinctly autumnal.

There’s still a week to sign up for this round. Our squares are quite literally hand-made; cut by hand and sewn by hand in Los Angeles. Because our manufacture is in-house, and we have no retail partners, we’re able to offer them for dramatically less than you’d pay in a fine men’s store.

If you want to join us, or give a membership as a gift, you can do so here.

Green Corduroys for Fall
I’m personally not one for unusual trousers. Some men can pull off loud colors and vivid patterns with aplomb, but they’re few and far between, and I’m not one of them. The one exception I make, however, are green corduroys in the fall.
If you’re just getting your first pair of corduroys, I recommend ones in a dark shade of russet brown. These can be successfully worn with almost any kind of autumnal clothing you can imagine – grey shawl collar cardigans, green waxed cotton Barbour jackets, navy flannel shirts, and brown suede shoes. They’ll be soft, comfortable, and a touch warm.
If you’re getting your second pair, I recommend wheat. Anything that resembles something like the muted color on your standard pair of chinos to ones that are just a touch more golden. If you hit the right shade, and be sure not to veer into something too yellow, these should be about as easy to wear as your dark brown pair.
Once you’re on your third, however, I suggest considering green - something like British racing green or olive. These are slightly more daring colors, but still feel reasonably conservative. Like dark brown and wheat, green is an earthy color that feels very seasonally appropriate in the fall. I wear mine with navy or grey sweaters, the kind with a very heavy texture such as Shetland or lambswool, or with a gun club sport coat, pale blue oxford cloth shirt, and brown slip on shoes, like you see above.
If you’ve never bought corduroys before, take care in paying attention to the size of the wales. These are the ribs that make up the fabric’s signature texture. Something with thicker, more widely spaced, plush wales will look a bit more old-fashioned; something very fine will look close to velvet. A mid-sized wale is a safe bet, though I don’t think there’s anything wrong with wide wales either. Those will look quite comfortable and traditional, and if you don’t wear them in an overly baggy cut, they won’t look too frumpy. My green corduroys are somewhat wide waled, actually, and cut on the fuller side of slim. Corduroys are of course a country garment, but in green I think they’re especially rustic. Country clothes, in my opinion, always look better when they’re cut slightly fuller than city clothes. 
You can pick up decent corduroys at any number of places. Cordings, Pakeman, and Hoggs of Fife have very nice traditionally cut models, while Epaulet’s and Howard Yount’s will run slim. There’s also Ralph Lauren and Brooks Brothers, who will have different models for different fits. The upside to them is that you’re more likely to live near one of their stores, so you can check out their products in person. However, I’ve also found that the other suppliers are happy to give you measurements if you enquire. 
(As an aside, if you haven’t read Jesse’s address to the Corduroy Appreciation Club, you really ought to read it. It stands out in my mind as one of the funniest clothing-related things I’ve ever come across. Corduroy Now, Corduroy Forever!) 

Green Corduroys for Fall

I’m personally not one for unusual trousers. Some men can pull off loud colors and vivid patterns with aplomb, but they’re few and far between, and I’m not one of them. The one exception I make, however, are green corduroys in the fall.

If you’re just getting your first pair of corduroys, I recommend ones in a dark shade of russet brown. These can be successfully worn with almost any kind of autumnal clothing you can imagine – grey shawl collar cardigans, green waxed cotton Barbour jackets, navy flannel shirts, and brown suede shoes. They’ll be soft, comfortable, and a touch warm.

If you’re getting your second pair, I recommend wheat. Anything that resembles something like the muted color on your standard pair of chinos to ones that are just a touch more golden. If you hit the right shade, and be sure not to veer into something too yellow, these should be about as easy to wear as your dark brown pair.

Once you’re on your third, however, I suggest considering green - something like British racing green or olive. These are slightly more daring colors, but still feel reasonably conservative. Like dark brown and wheat, green is an earthy color that feels very seasonally appropriate in the fall. I wear mine with navy or grey sweaters, the kind with a very heavy texture such as Shetland or lambswool, or with a gun club sport coat, pale blue oxford cloth shirt, and brown slip on shoes, like you see above.

If you’ve never bought corduroys before, take care in paying attention to the size of the wales. These are the ribs that make up the fabric’s signature texture. Something with thicker, more widely spaced, plush wales will look a bit more old-fashioned; something very fine will look close to velvet. A mid-sized wale is a safe bet, though I don’t think there’s anything wrong with wide wales either. Those will look quite comfortable and traditional, and if you don’t wear them in an overly baggy cut, they won’t look too frumpy. My green corduroys are somewhat wide waled, actually, and cut on the fuller side of slim. Corduroys are of course a country garment, but in green I think they’re especially rustic. Country clothes, in my opinion, always look better when they’re cut slightly fuller than city clothes. 

You can pick up decent corduroys at any number of places. Cordings, Pakeman, and Hoggs of Fife have very nice traditionally cut models, while Epaulet’s and Howard Yount’s will run slim. There’s also Ralph Lauren and Brooks Brothers, who will have different models for different fits. The upside to them is that you’re more likely to live near one of their stores, so you can check out their products in person. However, I’ve also found that the other suppliers are happy to give you measurements if you enquire. 

(As an aside, if you haven’t read Jesse’s address to the Corduroy Appreciation Club, you really ought to read it. It stands out in my mind as one of the funniest clothing-related things I’ve ever come across. Corduroy Now, Corduroy Forever!) 

Thinking of Fall
This portrait of William Eggleston, shot by Maude Schuyler Clay, embodies everything that’s beautiful about fall. Notice the 3/2 roll tweed with faint overpane check; the light blue, candy striped OCBD; and the grey crewneck sweater, most likely made from a hairy Shetland wool. These three fabrics - tweed, oxford cotton, and Shetland wool - pair well in their roughness, giving the ensemble a nicely tailored, but still casual, look. Below he could be wearing something equally textured and casual, such as dark chocolate brown corduroys with suede chukka boots, or perhaps a heavy pair of khaki chinos, ones where the diagonal weave is easily visible, and some shell cordovan wingtips. This to me is fall. 
Oh, and the faux-tortiseshell glasses are a nice touch. Something I’ve been wanting for a bugger long time. 

Thinking of Fall

This portrait of William Eggleston, shot by Maude Schuyler Clay, embodies everything that’s beautiful about fall. Notice the 3/2 roll tweed with faint overpane check; the light blue, candy striped OCBD; and the grey crewneck sweater, most likely made from a hairy Shetland wool. These three fabrics - tweed, oxford cotton, and Shetland wool - pair well in their roughness, giving the ensemble a nicely tailored, but still casual, look. Below he could be wearing something equally textured and casual, such as dark chocolate brown corduroys with suede chukka boots, or perhaps a heavy pair of khaki chinos, ones where the diagonal weave is easily visible, and some shell cordovan wingtips. This to me is fall. 

Oh, and the faux-tortiseshell glasses are a nice touch. Something I’ve been wanting for a bugger long time. 

Chukkas for Fall

Fall for me is about boots. Brass-buckled tan jodhpurs worn with olive moleskins; shell cordovan balmoral boots, in that perfect tone of reddish brown, worn with grey flannel trousers; and handsewn, chunky moc-toe boots worn with dark blue jeans. There are dozens of styles, but the most versatile and easy-to-wear of them all is the chukka. Brought over from India by the British Raj, these were named “chukkas” after the playing period in polo. They were quite popular in the 1940s and 1950s, and today can still be worn with a wide range of ensembles – anything from chinos to jeans to wool trousers, put together with something as dressy as a sport coat or as casual a four-pocket field jacket. They can even be worn with suits, although it’s advisable to stick with more “casual” varieties, such as ones made from flannel, linen, or tweed, rather than smooth, lightweight worsted wools.

There are number of good options to consider. For those on a budget, I recommend Loake or Meermin. Loake has two models: the Kempton, which is built on the round toe 026 last, and the Pimlico, which is built on the slightly sleeker, soft-square toe Capital. These are also available rebranded as the Harwood at Charles Trywhitt, as well as the Gosforth and Barrow from Herring. Meermin, on the other hand, has two suede models on their Rui last, which is a round toe design you can more closely inspect here. If you happen to not like the Rui, Meermin can also custom build you a chukka with any last, leather, and sole you wish for a small surcharge. Just drop them a note through their website to order. Their quality is just as good, if not considerably better once you go made-to-order, as Loake’s. 

If you’re willing to spend a little bit more money, there’s a wider range of options. Allen Edmonds, for example, has their Malvern on sale for about $250. For a few hundred dollars more, there’s a number of designs at Crockett and Jones, which you can peruse by doing a search on their website for “chukkas.” My favorite from them is probably the Brecon, a country calf leather boot built on a Dainite sole. It’s a very rustic shoe that can be successfully paired with corduroys, moleskins, and jeans. For something sleeker, check out Kent Wang, who has something similar to the Crockett and Jones’ Tetbury for about $350. Additionally, there’s this handsome shell cordovan version from Alden. If you want one, but can’t afford the price, you can have something similar made through Meermin, custom ordered, for about half the cost.

Of course, those just scratch the surface of the most basic models available. There’s also crepe rubber soled chukkas, which are an incredible pleasure to walk on. Like other well made shoes, these can last years and years if properly taken care of and given regular resolings. Simple, basic designs include Clark’s Desert Boots, Church’s Sahara, Loake’s Campden, and A Suitable Wardrobe’s Easy Fitting Chukka. For something lighter and more breathable, try ones that are unlined. Unlined chukkas lack structure around the uppers, so they feel more like slippers. Models here include Allen Edmonds’ Amok and Alden’s 1494. The Amok is noticeably sleeker, but I find more charm in Alden’s wider 1494 version. Crockett and Jones also has unlined models called the Milton and Hartland, as well as one simply named the “Chukka.” All of those are available for view on their website and for purchase through their New York City store.

Whatever you choose, I encourage you to pick up a pair (if you don’t already own some) and try wearing them this fall with jeans and tweeds, corduroys and Shetland sweaters, and wool trousers and waxed cotton coats. In a smooth brown calfskin or russet shade of suede, these can be some of the most versatile shoes you will ever own. 

Is it bad that I’m already thinking about Fall?

Some beautiful photographs of Holland and Sherry tweeds here and here.

Put This On Season Two, Episode 4: Eccentric Style

Put This On, a web series about dressing like a grownup, visits London, where we visit with a few of the distinctive personalities that help make London a special place.

Guy Hills makes tweeds with the colors of the London streets- including reflective stripes for cyclists.

David Saxby went from being a vintage dealer to recreating traditional styles in his own factories with the workers who’d been laid off as clothing manufacture left England.

We visit Cordings, an unusual outdoor clothing store that Eric Clapton felt so strongly about he bought it.

And we learn a few ways to tie a scarf. Plus our sponsor, Mailchimp, and of course Rudiments with Dave Hill.

This is the fourth episode in our six-episode second season. In this season, we visit the three greatest men’s style cities in the world, as chosen by our readers - New York, Milan and London.

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Watch it elsewhere:

Vimeo / Youtube / iTunes


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Buy Season One on DVD for $16

This episode was supported by our viewers and by Mailchimp.


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Executive Producers: Jesse Thorn & Adam Lisagor

Director: Benjamin Ahr Harrison

Host / Writer / Producer: Jesse Thorn

Rudiments: Dave Hill

Producer: Kristian Brodie

Director of Photography: Charlie Cook

Sound: Kristian Brodie

Fall and Winter Gloves

Depending on where you live, it may be time to start wearing gloves. When buying a pair, I recommend you avoid cotton, acrylic, and synthetic leathers; they’re neither warm nor durable. Wool or cashmere can work if they’re tightly knit. I wear Filson’s fingerless wool gloves when I go jogging (they also come in a full fingered variety). For people who are always on electronic devices, there’s also Freehands.

For something a bit sharper looking, try leather gloves. These can be made out of any number of animal skins. Peccary is luxurious and soft, while hairsheep is finer and less bulky. Deerskin has a “tacky” surface that’s good for gripping, but it’s a bit more rugged in appearance. There are also hogskin gloves, which are very hard-wearing.

Additionally, there are the linings. If you plan to use these in cold weather, you’ll want the inside of the gloves lined with cashmere or silk. Cashmere will be softer and warmer, but also a bit bulkier. If you’re going to wear them in a cool climate, opt for a pair that’s unlined. They won’t be as warm, but they’ll be more durable and fit better.

Colorwise, black and brown are the most versatile, but like with shoes and suits, I find black to be overrated. I have a few pairs of gloves that match the range of colors in my shoes - merlot, dark brown, mid-brown, and tan. When I want to add a bit of texture or visual interest, I wear dark green capeskin or grey suede lambskin. I also recently ordered some yellow chamois, which are the classic gentleman’s gloves, but they’ve yet to arrive.

As for where you can buy a a good pair, I recommend Dents and Pickett. American retailers such as Ralph Lauren, Brooks Brothers, Paul Stuart, Hickey Freeman, and Ben Silver also sell very good models. The upside to buying from them is that they often hold seasonal sales. For something a bit more affordable, Nordstrom’s house brand is a pretty good value. Finally, remember that the most important part of a glove is the fit - you want something that fits and flatters your hand. If you’re not able to find a proper pair, try getting custom gloves through Chester Jefferies or Madova. Both will make a glove for you if you send in a tracing of your hand, but I find that photocopies or scans work best.

I really like this ensemble. 

  • Heavy wool trousers with a textured nap and big cuffs.
  • Grey, single-breasted, flannel wool blazer.
  • Tattersall button-up shirt. 
  • Brown wool tie with white pindots.
  • Brown wool scarf with red and yellow detailing.
  • Drab olive green, military-inspired, field jacket with removable down vest.
  • And last, but not least, brown suede shoes. 

I might have opted for a different color scarf, perhaps dark red, just so there isn’t so much brown, but it’s an otherwise really nice fall look. The wools give it a lot of texture, the tattersall shirt is unique but not overpowering, and military field jacket makes for a nice contrast. Great stuff.  

(picture taken from Men’s Ex)