Bill Cunningham is everything that’s right about fashion. He’s a street photographer. A real street photographer. He doesn’t hang out outside fashion shows and shoot models when they come outside to smoke. He dons his anorak, jumps on his bike and rides it all over New York City, taking pictures of what he notices. He isn’t trying to shape trends, he’s just trying to capture the flavor of what’s On the Street. He isn’t interested in predicting trends or capturing the marketplace. He just returns humane photographs of real people in interesting outfits.

I tried my damndest to interview Cunningham for Season One of PTO, and was rebuffed by the Times’ publicity department, but I still hold out hope for the future. In the meantime, I’m excited about this feature documentary.

If you haven’t read this wonderful first-person piece from 2002, it’s a must-read. So is this New Yorker profile from 2009. What a graceful man.

Date Night with Alex Grant: The Brothers Bloom
I promise I’m not just reblogging every one of Alex’s Date Night posts, but I thought I’d share this one because too few folks saw this excellent film. Adrian Brody’s elegance is nonpareil.
In the interest of full disclosure, I must admit that Rian Johnson, who directed The Brothers Bloom, is a friend of ours and a big PTO booster. He has even, in past, been in INTENSE TALKS to be a guest director on a future PTO episode. At the moment, he’s working on a new movie with the star of his first film Brick, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, and we expect it’ll be another winner. With Rian and JGL on board, we can expect it will be stylish.

Date Night with Alex Grant: The Brothers Bloom

I promise I’m not just reblogging every one of Alex’s Date Night posts, but I thought I’d share this one because too few folks saw this excellent film. Adrian Brody’s elegance is nonpareil.

In the interest of full disclosure, I must admit that Rian Johnson, who directed The Brothers Bloom, is a friend of ours and a big PTO booster. He has even, in past, been in INTENSE TALKS to be a guest director on a future PTO episode. At the moment, he’s working on a new movie with the star of his first film Brick, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, and we expect it’ll be another winner. With Rian and JGL on board, we can expect it will be stylish.

Don’t miss this remarkable dissection of the clothes Sean Connery wore as James Bond in Dr. No. A wonderful piece, and a tribute to the basics - navy blazers, dark blue grenadine ties, forward pleats, elegant black tie.

Don’t miss this remarkable dissection of the clothes Sean Connery wore as James Bond in Dr. No. A wonderful piece, and a tribute to the basics - navy blazers, dark blue grenadine ties, forward pleats, elegant black tie.

Speaking of podcasts, Adam and I drove to North Hollywood the other day to record an episode of the film show Battleship Pretension.  We talked with the show’s hosts Tyler and David about some of our favorite male style icons in film.  We picked a few that you might expect - Cary Grant, Steve McQueen - but also a few you might not.  You can listen above, or get the show in iTunes by clicking here.

When working with a lathe, always wear a neck scarf.  Always.
(From a beautiful film on the design process at Walter Landor & Associates in the 1960s.)
(Thanks, Conor)

When working with a lathe, always wear a neck scarf.  Always.

(From a beautiful film on the design process at Walter Landor & Associates in the 1960s.)

(Thanks, Conor)

Me talking with the wonderful Kevin Kline at Sundance for my public radio show, The Sound of Young America.  He starred in a film called The Extra Man, which was premiering at the festival.  His character in the movie is an aging playwright and dandy who maintains his elegant lifestyle by being an “extra man,” which is something like being a gigolo, only without the sex.  His fancy dinners, summer house and opera tickets are all funded by either by the generosity of older ladies or, alternately, low-level graft.

After we stopped shooting, Kline told me that there was a scene which was shot but ultimately cut where his character and his character’s protege, portrayed by Paul Dano, dumpster-dove for furniture and thrifted for their clothes.  Kline looked wonderful in the film - every so slightly threadbare and spectacularly aristocratic.  As far as I’m concerned, ever so slightly threadbare is the way to go if you’re going to look aristocratic, whether or not you’re an aristocrat.

Also of note: Dano’s character moves to New York and rents a room from Kline after finding his ad in the newspaper classifieds: “Gentleman Seeks Same.”

Designer-turned-director Tom Ford talks about his first film A Single Man with Elvis Mitchell.