The Second Best Color for Flannel Trousers
I recently picked up a new pair of flannel trousers, despite having promised myself that I wouldn’t buy any more dress pants for the rest of the year. I have too many pairs as is, and I’ve come to realize that one only needs five or six odd trousers per season, each in that season’s appropriate fabrics (e.g. heavy flannels and cavalry twill for fall/ winter; tropical wools and linen for spring/ summer). Maybe a few year-rounders such as chinos and jeans to boot, but any more than that, and things just collect dust.
However, I couldn’t resist these these tan flannel trousers from Howard Yount. I’ve been looking for this fabric for months, and being that Howard Yount makes pants that fit me better than most, I figured I could break my promise just this once.
Turns out I’ve been wearing these just as often as my grey flannels, which I’ve always considered to be the most versatile and useful trousers in my closet. The pale, tan color here goes very well with dark blue or brown odd jackets, as well as antique tan or dark brown shoes. They’re easy to wear once you realize they’re about the same color as khaki chinos, but with the added texture of worsted flannel. 
Tan flannel used to be more common before men only wore grey. Today, one can hardly find them. I know Barney’s has a version, though I’m unsure of how they fit. Ralph Lauren and Orvis used to as well last season, but not anymore. That leaves Howard Yount, which I can say is now stocking the second best color for flannel trousers: tan.

The Second Best Color for Flannel Trousers

I recently picked up a new pair of flannel trousers, despite having promised myself that I wouldn’t buy any more dress pants for the rest of the year. I have too many pairs as is, and I’ve come to realize that one only needs five or six odd trousers per season, each in that season’s appropriate fabrics (e.g. heavy flannels and cavalry twill for fall/ winter; tropical wools and linen for spring/ summer). Maybe a few year-rounders such as chinos and jeans to boot, but any more than that, and things just collect dust.

However, I couldn’t resist these these tan flannel trousers from Howard Yount. I’ve been looking for this fabric for months, and being that Howard Yount makes pants that fit me better than most, I figured I could break my promise just this once.

Turns out I’ve been wearing these just as often as my grey flannels, which I’ve always considered to be the most versatile and useful trousers in my closet. The pale, tan color here goes very well with dark blue or brown odd jackets, as well as antique tan or dark brown shoes. They’re easy to wear once you realize they’re about the same color as khaki chinos, but with the added texture of worsted flannel. 

Tan flannel used to be more common before men only wore grey. Today, one can hardly find them. I know Barney’s has a version, though I’m unsure of how they fit. Ralph Lauren and Orvis used to as well last season, but not anymore. That leaves Howard Yount, which I can say is now stocking the second best color for flannel trousers: tan.

Worsted vs. Woolen Flannels
I love wool flannel, especially when it’s made into trousers. It never looks too slick or pushy, and even when it’s patterned, the soft and fuzzy surface can make the pattern a bit more muted so that it’s never distasteful. In its most classic form, solid mid-grey, it also gives a strong sense of tradition and refinement. 
In addition to looking sharp, it’s also incredibly comfortable. In fact, some may find it curious to know that flannel was originally used for underwear. It wasn’t until the mid-19th century that men and women started using it for outer garments and suits. You can find flannel undergarments mentioned in English novels, such as Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility. 
The problem with it, however, is that it often doesn’t wear that well, at least when compared to other wool fabrics. If you put them to work day in, day out, they can develop a sheen relatively quickly, especially around the seat. 
The trick is to buy worsted flannels and not woolens. Worsted and woolens, as you may know, are the two major classes of wool fabrics. Worsteds are made from tightly woven long strands of combed-out wool, while woolens are typically made from shorter ones. The difference between the two is that worsteds are smoother in texture and appearance, and feel bit crisper in the hand. Woolens, on the other hand, are generally softer and spongier, and feel a bit loftier. To give examples, gabardine and twill tend to be worsted, and tweed tends to be woolen. 
Flannel can come in both forms. If you buy worsted flannel, it will feel less lofty, but it will also wear much harder. You can tell which is which by taking a very close look at the fabric. Worsteds generally are made with a twill weave, which means if you look closely, you’ll see diagonal lines, much like you see on jeans, underneath the fuzzy nap surface. Woolens, on the other hand, won’t have a twill weave, or any one that has a regular pattern for that matter, and will generally look a bit more mottled. 
If you can afford woolen flannels, however, you should just go with that. It tends to drape better, feel softer, and just be all around much more interesting. The depth and color variation you see in it far surpasses worsteds, but all this is, of course, at the sacrifice of durability. 

Worsted vs. Woolen Flannels

I love wool flannel, especially when it’s made into trousers. It never looks too slick or pushy, and even when it’s patterned, the soft and fuzzy surface can make the pattern a bit more muted so that it’s never distasteful. In its most classic form, solid mid-grey, it also gives a strong sense of tradition and refinement. 

In addition to looking sharp, it’s also incredibly comfortable. In fact, some may find it curious to know that flannel was originally used for underwear. It wasn’t until the mid-19th century that men and women started using it for outer garments and suits. You can find flannel undergarments mentioned in English novels, such as Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility

The problem with it, however, is that it often doesn’t wear that well, at least when compared to other wool fabrics. If you put them to work day in, day out, they can develop a sheen relatively quickly, especially around the seat. 

The trick is to buy worsted flannels and not woolens. Worsted and woolens, as you may know, are the two major classes of wool fabrics. Worsteds are made from tightly woven long strands of combed-out wool, while woolens are typically made from shorter ones. The difference between the two is that worsteds are smoother in texture and appearance, and feel bit crisper in the hand. Woolens, on the other hand, are generally softer and spongier, and feel a bit loftier. To give examples, gabardine and twill tend to be worsted, and tweed tends to be woolen. 

Flannel can come in both forms. If you buy worsted flannel, it will feel less lofty, but it will also wear much harder. You can tell which is which by taking a very close look at the fabric. Worsteds generally are made with a twill weave, which means if you look closely, you’ll see diagonal lines, much like you see on jeans, underneath the fuzzy nap surface. Woolens, on the other hand, won’t have a twill weave, or any one that has a regular pattern for that matter, and will generally look a bit more mottled. 

If you can afford woolen flannels, however, you should just go with that. It tends to drape better, feel softer, and just be all around much more interesting. The depth and color variation you see in it far surpasses worsteds, but all this is, of course, at the sacrifice of durability. 

BespoKenN recently showed me these flannel trousers by Paul Stuart. For those unfamiliar with flannel, it’s a densely packed, soft fabric that has wool fibers of varying lengths laying in different directions. The close up pictures here show it well. The fabric can come in various weights and it always feels amazingly comfortable. It’s also very efficient at trapping heat, so it’s great for the fall and winter seasons.

I have a few flannel trousers in various shades of grey and brown, but have been wondering what would be the next best color to get them in. I’ve been contemplating olive, and after seeing these Paul Stuart flannels, I think I’ve come to the right decision.

ethandesu:

Ghillie and Flannel

This photo is a perfect illustration of the power of flannel trousers.
See how pleasing the contrast between the soft finish of the flannel and the hard finish of the shoe is?
I have to admit that I’m also drawn to the audacity of the ghillies. Ghillies are a traditional Scottish shoe - the distinguishing feature is the unusual lacing system. True traditional ghillies, which are worn for Scottish dancing, don’t have tongues. This shoes off the hose, but like brogueing, its roots are practical - the lack of tongue left an easy egress for bogwater. They’re also tied around the shin, so the knot doesn’t get muddy.
The tongue-less style are really only practical to wear with other elements of traditional Scottish dress, but this toned-down version looks beautiful, doesn’t it?

ethandesu:

Ghillie and Flannel

This photo is a perfect illustration of the power of flannel trousers.

See how pleasing the contrast between the soft finish of the flannel and the hard finish of the shoe is?

I have to admit that I’m also drawn to the audacity of the ghillies. Ghillies are a traditional Scottish shoe - the distinguishing feature is the unusual lacing system. True traditional ghillies, which are worn for Scottish dancing, don’t have tongues. This shoes off the hose, but like brogueing, its roots are practical - the lack of tongue left an easy egress for bogwater. They’re also tied around the shin, so the knot doesn’t get muddy.

The tongue-less style are really only practical to wear with other elements of traditional Scottish dress, but this toned-down version looks beautiful, doesn’t it?

(Source: ethandesu)

thisfits:

Tailored Fit Flat Front Flannel Trousers - $90.65 shipped at Lands’ End
Use promo code STUDY, PIN 1372 (30% off one item, free shipping for $50+ purchase)
I’ve been on the look out for mid-grey flannel pants for a few weeks now, and this is the best price I’ve seen yet. Note that there’s free hemming, down to the quarter inch. That said, Kiyoshi and others have said these still need a taper, so you may not save that much on tailoring.

This is a very solid value (note that the coupon is probably limited, but you can get a deal by signing up for Lands’ End’s newsletter). I would recommend Polo from eBay first - there’s usually some there for about this price - but otherwise, go Lands’ End if you don’t want to spend more than a hundy.

thisfits:

Tailored Fit Flat Front Flannel Trousers - $90.65 shipped at Lands’ End

Use promo code STUDY, PIN 1372 (30% off one item, free shipping for $50+ purchase)

I’ve been on the look out for mid-grey flannel pants for a few weeks now, and this is the best price I’ve seen yet. Note that there’s free hemming, down to the quarter inch. That said, Kiyoshi and others have said these still need a taper, so you may not save that much on tailoring.

This is a very solid value (note that the coupon is probably limited, but you can get a deal by signing up for Lands’ End’s newsletter). I would recommend Polo from eBay first - there’s usually some there for about this price - but otherwise, go Lands’ End if you don’t want to spend more than a hundy.

The Importance of Gray Pants
There are two essential casual pants: blue jeans and chinos.
For every other situation that doesn’t call for a suit, there is only one: gray wool.
Even more than the blue blazer, the gray pant is a staple of the well-dressed man. Virtually every sportcoat will look well paired with gray pants. In fact, some suggest that if a sportcoat doesn’t pair with gray pants, you shouldn’t bother buying it. Gray pants are a foundation: they are the first pants you should buy, and probably the second and third, as well.
Truth be told, you will likely need more than one pair of gray pants. Flannel is the best fabric for winter. It’s warmer, and it has been a favorite for decades because it wears and drapes so well. In the summer months, you’ll need something lighter in weight - probably a worsted. If you live somewhere genuinely hot, you should consider a pair in a very light weight wool designed for hot weather, like a fresco.
The matter of styling is up to you. The current style tends toward a slim, flat-front pant. I have a pair of Brunello Cucinelli flannels in this style, and they’re wonderful with a trim coat. I also have a pair of Polo flannels that are notably wider in the leg, with double reverse pleats, for when I’m feeling a little more classic. My worsteds are by Incotex, with some a little wider than the others.
A mid-gray will be most versatile. Darker grays are a little more sober, but a little tougher to pair. Lighter grays are in style at the moment, and can look quite elegant, but are a little less serious-looking. Serious-looking, of course, is a good quality if you’re buying just one pair.
Gray pants are the garment that you’ll go to again and again. It is the rare outfit that features a jacket, but not a suit that wouldn’t look great with a pair of mid-gray pants. Other colors - like khaki or navy blue - should get in line well behind gray. Seriously: at least two, maybe three or four pairs of gray pants before you buy any other color.
(Above pants, in charcoal gray, by Howard Yount)

The Importance of Gray Pants

There are two essential casual pants: blue jeans and chinos.

For every other situation that doesn’t call for a suit, there is only one: gray wool.

Even more than the blue blazer, the gray pant is a staple of the well-dressed man. Virtually every sportcoat will look well paired with gray pants. In fact, some suggest that if a sportcoat doesn’t pair with gray pants, you shouldn’t bother buying it. Gray pants are a foundation: they are the first pants you should buy, and probably the second and third, as well.

Truth be told, you will likely need more than one pair of gray pants. Flannel is the best fabric for winter. It’s warmer, and it has been a favorite for decades because it wears and drapes so well. In the summer months, you’ll need something lighter in weight - probably a worsted. If you live somewhere genuinely hot, you should consider a pair in a very light weight wool designed for hot weather, like a fresco.

The matter of styling is up to you. The current style tends toward a slim, flat-front pant. I have a pair of Brunello Cucinelli flannels in this style, and they’re wonderful with a trim coat. I also have a pair of Polo flannels that are notably wider in the leg, with double reverse pleats, for when I’m feeling a little more classic. My worsteds are by Incotex, with some a little wider than the others.

A mid-gray will be most versatile. Darker grays are a little more sober, but a little tougher to pair. Lighter grays are in style at the moment, and can look quite elegant, but are a little less serious-looking. Serious-looking, of course, is a good quality if you’re buying just one pair.

Gray pants are the garment that you’ll go to again and again. It is the rare outfit that features a jacket, but not a suit that wouldn’t look great with a pair of mid-gray pants. Other colors - like khaki or navy blue - should get in line well behind gray. Seriously: at least two, maybe three or four pairs of gray pants before you buy any other color.

(Above pants, in charcoal gray, by Howard Yount)

novh:

Brooks Brothers | Extra-Slim Fit Navy Plaid with Cream Deco Flannel Sport Shirt

Now that’s a beautiful shirt.
mostexerent:

The man that has a lot to answer for.. Thank you G. Agnelli
Via da-i-net

What’s sad about this picture is how rare it is to find a suit made of real, heavy flannel in stores these days.  This is a man (Gianni Agnelli) wearing three solid colors, but his outfit is beautiful to look at.  The reason is the rich texture of his flannel suit and grendine tie.  And flannel hangs better, too.

mostexerent:

The man that has a lot to answer for.. Thank you G. Agnelli

Via da-i-net

What’s sad about this picture is how rare it is to find a suit made of real, heavy flannel in stores these days.  This is a man (Gianni Agnelli) wearing three solid colors, but his outfit is beautiful to look at.  The reason is the rich texture of his flannel suit and grendine tie.  And flannel hangs better, too.

I Want To Go To There
The Brooklyn-based Epaulet is bringing this special treat to this weekend’s Pop-Up Flea in New York.  Dang.
Seriously: if anyone is headed out and looking for a Christmas present for Mr. Jesse Thorn of Put This On… these are totally his colors.  Size large.
I repeat: dang.
A red/cream/black version is available on Epaulet’s site at $130.

I Want To Go To There

The Brooklyn-based Epaulet is bringing this special treat to this weekend’s Pop-Up Flea in New York.  Dang.

Seriously: if anyone is headed out and looking for a Christmas present for Mr. Jesse Thorn of Put This On… these are totally his colors.  Size large.

I repeat: dang.

A red/cream/black version is available on Epaulet’s site at $130.