In Praise of Green Ties

Like my buddy Doc Hu, I’m a big fan of green ties. Pair them with a gray suit and dark brown shoes, and you’ll be one of the most uniquely and elegantly dressed men around. You can also wear a green tie with any number of country tweeds, especially those with big checks and windowpanes, or shirts with a similar country sensibility, such as brushed twill tattersalls. Ideally, if you wear something with checks, it would be good to have one of the minor colors in those checks also be green, so that you can play off the color in your tie. 

Unfortunately, most men don’t have any green ties. If you’re just getting your first, start with the basics - grenadines and knits. On the high end, there is Drakes of London’s kelly green grenadines and tartan green knits. Those will be some of the best on the market, but at $150, not everyone can spare the money. Much more affordable are Sam Hober’s green grenadines, which he has in four different shades, and come in garza grossa and garza fina. The difference between the two varieties is in how evident the weaving is; garza grossa is bigger and garza fina is finer. I have a strong preference for garza grossa, but it’s a matter of preference. Hober’s ties are custom made and cost $80. The quality is remarkable and gives up nothing to other high-end labels. In fact, as you can see from this picture, Hober’s ties are often better than some of luxury-end ties. While both are handmade, Hober’s looks more cleanly made while the Borrelli has a bit of crinkling at the tip. 

For an affordable green knit, check out Mountain and Sackett. It’s made from a nice crunchy silk and is respectable width of 2.5 inches - nothing too wide or too narrow. I have the tie myself and the quality is excellent. 

I think green ties can be worn year-round, as long as it’s paired with the right items, but it’s especially nice for the Fall season. Since that’s approaching, if you already have items such as a grey suit, consider getting a green tie for yourself before September arrives. 

(Photo credits: top photo by Ethan Desu for The Armoury; bottom left photo by Kenneth Lim for The Armoury, bottom right photo by an unknown photographer)