Finding An Eyewear Case
It’s been unexpectedly wet and cloudy in San Francisco, but to prepare for what should be a real summer, I recently went in search for an eyewear case. Having to wear eyeglasses all the time means that I need some place to put my regular frames when I put on sunglasses, and although eyewear often comes with cases, none of them are particularly attractive.
I found mine through Ghurka. It’s a tan leather sleeve with a sueded interior and nicely turned edges (meaning the leather on the edges is turned inward and stitched down, rather than being left exposed). I like that it’s simple enough that I can use just one hand to hold the sleeve and slip my glasses in (useful if you’re on the run and carrying a bag of some sort). It also fits comfortably in my interior coat pocket. The leather quality leaves much to be desired, however, and for the price, I was hoping for something better.
Still, I decided to keep it, as it seemed to be the best option for my needs. In my search though, I found a number of options that might work better with a backpack or briefcase. La Portegna, Glenroyal, Freeman’s Sporting Club, Makr, and Emil Erwin, for example, make softly shaped cases that give a bit more protection. They’re not exactly hardcases, per se, but  should your case ever wind up at the bottom of a bag, their fuller shape should fare better than a simple sleeve.
I also like this unique design by Tanner Goods, but it requires a bit more work to open and close. Probably not good for someone who’s always on the run, but it looks nice.
If you’re interested in other sleeve designs besides Ghurka’s, there’s Daines & Hathaway, Barrett Alley, and Col. Littleton. I also liked the uniqueness of these silk repp striped sleeves sold by Ben Silver, Shibumi, and E. Marinella.
Finally, for something just cheap and simple, you can find these Ralph Lauren cases all over eBay for about $25 (just search around). The material isn’t that great, but the front side is completely hard, which is nice if you’re a bit rough on your things.

Finding An Eyewear Case

It’s been unexpectedly wet and cloudy in San Francisco, but to prepare for what should be a real summer, I recently went in search for an eyewear case. Having to wear eyeglasses all the time means that I need some place to put my regular frames when I put on sunglasses, and although eyewear often comes with cases, none of them are particularly attractive.

I found mine through Ghurka. It’s a tan leather sleeve with a sueded interior and nicely turned edges (meaning the leather on the edges is turned inward and stitched down, rather than being left exposed). I like that it’s simple enough that I can use just one hand to hold the sleeve and slip my glasses in (useful if you’re on the run and carrying a bag of some sort). It also fits comfortably in my interior coat pocket. The leather quality leaves much to be desired, however, and for the price, I was hoping for something better.

Still, I decided to keep it, as it seemed to be the best option for my needs. In my search though, I found a number of options that might work better with a backpack or briefcase. La Portegna, Glenroyal, Freeman’s Sporting Club, Makr, and Emil Erwin, for example, make softly shaped cases that give a bit more protection. They’re not exactly hardcases, per se, but  should your case ever wind up at the bottom of a bag, their fuller shape should fare better than a simple sleeve.

I also like this unique design by Tanner Goods, but it requires a bit more work to open and close. Probably not good for someone who’s always on the run, but it looks nice.

If you’re interested in other sleeve designs besides Ghurka’s, there’s Daines & Hathaway, Barrett Alley, and Col. Littleton. I also liked the uniqueness of these silk repp striped sleeves sold by Ben Silver, Shibumi, and E. Marinella.

Finally, for something just cheap and simple, you can find these Ralph Lauren cases all over eBay for about $25 (just search around). The material isn’t that great, but the front side is completely hard, which is nice if you’re a bit rough on your things.

The Chunky Turtleneck

A friend of mine recently asked me if I knew of a good source for chunky turtlenecks, which reminded of how much I like wearing mine. The one I bought is a cream-colored cable knit with a thickly ribbed, fold down collar. I think it pairs well with heavy outerwear pieces, such as duffle coats, waxed cotton jackets, and pea coats. Ideally, you would wear it when it’s bitterly cold outside, so that it’s more of a functional garment than just a fashion piece.

The best chunky turtleneck I know of is made by Inis Meain, a traditional knitwear maker based on one of the Aran Islands outside the coast of Ireland. Their sweaters are exceptional, but admittedly also very expensive. You can purchase one of their Aran turtleneck designs from Axel’s. For other options in this price tier, consider the offerings by Malo, Sandro, and E. Tautz. Note that Barney’s and Mr. Porter will hold 75%+ off sales at the end of the season (though, that’ll still leave many of those pieces in the “very-expensive” range).

For something more affordable, there’s S.E.H. Kelly’s moss-stitch knit and Ralph Lauren’s cable knit (the latter of the two is having a pretty big sale right now, incidentally, but unfortunately not on that sweater). Fisherman Out of Ireland also has a cabled and ribbed turtleneck available for $150, which you can buy from them through email. I’ve never handled any of their products, but reviews online seem to be good.

Finally, for lack of a better descriptor, there are slightly more rugged options that stay true to the sweater’s workwear origins. Orvis, North Sea Clothing Company, Nigel Cabourn, Aero Leathers, What Price Glory, and Freeman’s Sporting Club may have better bets if you’re likely to wear your turtleneck with things such as jeans and workwear jackets.

A word of caution before you proceed: though Tom Junod once had a great article in GQ about how his father religiously believed that turtlenecks were the most flattering thing a man can wear, I think they really should only be worn by men with defined jawlines. It doesn’t have to be model-esque, but a man with a weak jawline or flabby chin will only look worse when a turtleneck covers up whatever little definition he has. Best to be honest with yourself before you splurge on an expensive sweater. 

This beautiful turtleneck is the Mariner Sweater by Freeman’s Sporting Club. It’s 88% shetland, 12% cashmere, which sounds nice for the neck. The description helpfully offers “THIS IS NOT A FASHION SWEATER!” and “THIS IS A WINTER TOOL!” Actually, while I might disagree with the former statement, I agree with its sentiment - this looks like a very, very high quality piece, and while it may be fashionable, it’s a genuinely classic style. The Freeman’s pieces I have do not scrimp on quality, and this looks to be no exception. I should hope not, for $387.
If you like the idea of a sweater like this, but can’t afford the chunk of change it costs, try this reproduction WWII Submariner Sweater from What Price Glory? It’s all wool, and they have a good rep, but it isn’t knit in New York City. That said, it does cost more than $300 less.
Either way, I don’t think you’ll be disappointed. After all, this is A WINTER TOOL.
via Selectism

This beautiful turtleneck is the Mariner Sweater by Freeman’s Sporting Club. It’s 88% shetland, 12% cashmere, which sounds nice for the neck. The description helpfully offers “THIS IS NOT A FASHION SWEATER!” and “THIS IS A WINTER TOOL!” Actually, while I might disagree with the former statement, I agree with its sentiment - this looks like a very, very high quality piece, and while it may be fashionable, it’s a genuinely classic style. The Freeman’s pieces I have do not scrimp on quality, and this looks to be no exception. I should hope not, for $387.

If you like the idea of a sweater like this, but can’t afford the chunk of change it costs, try this reproduction WWII Submariner Sweater from What Price Glory? It’s all wool, and they have a good rep, but it isn’t knit in New York City. That said, it does cost more than $300 less.

Either way, I don’t think you’ll be disappointed. After all, this is A WINTER TOOL.

via Selectism

One of the garments I wear most is my “shacket" by Freeman’s Sporting Club.  If you’ve never had the pleasure of stopping in to this New York Men’s emporium, I’m sorry to hear it.  Certainly they’ve received a lot of attention for being very “on-trend” in their orientation - they sell classically styled clothing, both in suiting and outdoor wear, and they have some taxidermied animal heads on the walls.  That’s no reason to dismiss them, though.  Their clothes are flawlessly executed - just beautiful, beautiful stuff.  Expensive, too, but really lovely, and of consistently high quality. 
Freeman’s had previously offered a very limited selection online, through Refinery 29, but today they opened a new online store.  Take a look, and maybe you’ll find a simple, perfect piece to build your wardrobe around.  Between now and 6PM on Memorial Day, they’re offering 15% off - email info@freemanssportingclub.com to claim your discount.

One of the garments I wear most is my “shacket" by Freeman’s Sporting Club.  If you’ve never had the pleasure of stopping in to this New York Men’s emporium, I’m sorry to hear it.  Certainly they’ve received a lot of attention for being very “on-trend” in their orientation - they sell classically styled clothing, both in suiting and outdoor wear, and they have some taxidermied animal heads on the walls.  That’s no reason to dismiss them, though.  Their clothes are flawlessly executed - just beautiful, beautiful stuff.  Expensive, too, but really lovely, and of consistently high quality. 

Freeman’s had previously offered a very limited selection online, through Refinery 29, but today they opened a new online store.  Take a look, and maybe you’ll find a simple, perfect piece to build your wardrobe around.  Between now and 6PM on Memorial Day, they’re offering 15% off - email info@freemanssportingclub.com to claim your discount.

The right accessories are key to any outfit.
Here, a shirt jacket by Freeman’s Sporting Club compliments a brown dog by A Mommy Dog.

The right accessories are key to any outfit.

Here, a shirt jacket by Freeman’s Sporting Club compliments a brown dog by A Mommy Dog.