Green Jackets

I think winter has arrived in some parts of the country, but here in Northern California, it still feels like fall. So if it’s not too late to post, I’d like to give a recommendation for green jackets, which I’ve come to realize feel just right around this time of year.

By green jackets I mean four-pocket M65s, easy-fitting waxed cotton jackets, thick Loden wool coats, or some kind of casual outerwear piece made out of olive tweed, like you see above. These have a wonderful autumnal feeling, and can be successfully paired with year-round pants such as chinos or jeans, or something more seasonal, such as corduroys or heavy woolen trousers. In addition, green jackets are a nice way to pick up the natural colors around you in the autumn, as well as add a bit of a country look to your ensemble. While I’m suspicious of men who dress a bit too country in the city, adding a green jacket to a pair of jeans, flannel shirt, and heavy leather boots is a nice way to lend a gentle rustic touch without looking like you’re about to go duck hunting on Main Avenue.

So, try wearing a green jacket this fall.  

(Photos by Barbour, Nitty Gritty Shop, and Da I Net)

Green Corduroys for Fall
I’m personally not one for unusual trousers. Some men can pull off loud colors and vivid patterns with aplomb, but they’re few and far between, and I’m not one of them. The one exception I make, however, are green corduroys in the fall.
If you’re just getting your first pair of corduroys, I recommend ones in a dark shade of russet brown. These can be successfully worn with almost any kind of autumnal clothing you can imagine – grey shawl collar cardigans, green waxed cotton Barbour jackets, navy flannel shirts, and brown suede shoes. They’ll be soft, comfortable, and a touch warm.
If you’re getting your second pair, I recommend wheat. Anything that resembles something like the muted color on your standard pair of chinos to ones that are just a touch more golden. If you hit the right shade, and be sure not to veer into something too yellow, these should be about as easy to wear as your dark brown pair.
Once you’re on your third, however, I suggest considering green - something like British racing green or olive. These are slightly more daring colors, but still feel reasonably conservative. Like dark brown and wheat, green is an earthy color that feels very seasonally appropriate in the fall. I wear mine with navy or grey sweaters, the kind with a very heavy texture such as Shetland or lambswool, or with a gun club sport coat, pale blue oxford cloth shirt, and brown slip on shoes, like you see above.
If you’ve never bought corduroys before, take care in paying attention to the size of the wales. These are the ribs that make up the fabric’s signature texture. Something with thicker, more widely spaced, plush wales will look a bit more old-fashioned; something very fine will look close to velvet. A mid-sized wale is a safe bet, though I don’t think there’s anything wrong with wide wales either. Those will look quite comfortable and traditional, and if you don’t wear them in an overly baggy cut, they won’t look too frumpy. My green corduroys are somewhat wide waled, actually, and cut on the fuller side of slim. Corduroys are of course a country garment, but in green I think they’re especially rustic. Country clothes, in my opinion, always look better when they’re cut slightly fuller than city clothes. 
You can pick up decent corduroys at any number of places. Cordings, Pakeman, and Hoggs of Fife have very nice traditionally cut models, while Epaulet’s and Howard Yount’s will run slim. There’s also Ralph Lauren and Brooks Brothers, who will have different models for different fits. The upside to them is that you’re more likely to live near one of their stores, so you can check out their products in person. However, I’ve also found that the other suppliers are happy to give you measurements if you enquire. 
(As an aside, if you haven’t read Jesse’s address to the Corduroy Appreciation Club, you really ought to read it. It stands out in my mind as one of the funniest clothing-related things I’ve ever come across. Corduroy Now, Corduroy Forever!) 

Green Corduroys for Fall

I’m personally not one for unusual trousers. Some men can pull off loud colors and vivid patterns with aplomb, but they’re few and far between, and I’m not one of them. The one exception I make, however, are green corduroys in the fall.

If you’re just getting your first pair of corduroys, I recommend ones in a dark shade of russet brown. These can be successfully worn with almost any kind of autumnal clothing you can imagine – grey shawl collar cardigans, green waxed cotton Barbour jackets, navy flannel shirts, and brown suede shoes. They’ll be soft, comfortable, and a touch warm.

If you’re getting your second pair, I recommend wheat. Anything that resembles something like the muted color on your standard pair of chinos to ones that are just a touch more golden. If you hit the right shade, and be sure not to veer into something too yellow, these should be about as easy to wear as your dark brown pair.

Once you’re on your third, however, I suggest considering green - something like British racing green or olive. These are slightly more daring colors, but still feel reasonably conservative. Like dark brown and wheat, green is an earthy color that feels very seasonally appropriate in the fall. I wear mine with navy or grey sweaters, the kind with a very heavy texture such as Shetland or lambswool, or with a gun club sport coat, pale blue oxford cloth shirt, and brown slip on shoes, like you see above.

If you’ve never bought corduroys before, take care in paying attention to the size of the wales. These are the ribs that make up the fabric’s signature texture. Something with thicker, more widely spaced, plush wales will look a bit more old-fashioned; something very fine will look close to velvet. A mid-sized wale is a safe bet, though I don’t think there’s anything wrong with wide wales either. Those will look quite comfortable and traditional, and if you don’t wear them in an overly baggy cut, they won’t look too frumpy. My green corduroys are somewhat wide waled, actually, and cut on the fuller side of slim. Corduroys are of course a country garment, but in green I think they’re especially rustic. Country clothes, in my opinion, always look better when they’re cut slightly fuller than city clothes. 

You can pick up decent corduroys at any number of places. Cordings, Pakeman, and Hoggs of Fife have very nice traditionally cut models, while Epaulet’s and Howard Yount’s will run slim. There’s also Ralph Lauren and Brooks Brothers, who will have different models for different fits. The upside to them is that you’re more likely to live near one of their stores, so you can check out their products in person. However, I’ve also found that the other suppliers are happy to give you measurements if you enquire. 

(As an aside, if you haven’t read Jesse’s address to the Corduroy Appreciation Club, you really ought to read it. It stands out in my mind as one of the funniest clothing-related things I’ve ever come across. Corduroy Now, Corduroy Forever!) 

In Praise of Green Ties

Like my buddy Doc Hu, I’m a big fan of green ties. Pair them with a gray suit and dark brown shoes, and you’ll be one of the most uniquely and elegantly dressed men around. You can also wear a green tie with any number of country tweeds, especially those with big checks and windowpanes, or shirts with a similar country sensibility, such as brushed twill tattersalls. Ideally, if you wear something with checks, it would be good to have one of the minor colors in those checks also be green, so that you can play off the color in your tie. 

Unfortunately, most men don’t have any green ties. If you’re just getting your first, start with the basics - grenadines and knits. On the high end, there is Drakes of London’s kelly green grenadines and tartan green knits. Those will be some of the best on the market, but at $150, not everyone can spare the money. Much more affordable are Sam Hober’s green grenadines, which he has in four different shades, and come in garza grossa and garza fina. The difference between the two varieties is in how evident the weaving is; garza grossa is bigger and garza fina is finer. I have a strong preference for garza grossa, but it’s a matter of preference. Hober’s ties are custom made and cost $80. The quality is remarkable and gives up nothing to other high-end labels. In fact, as you can see from this picture, Hober’s ties are often better than some of luxury-end ties. While both are handmade, Hober’s looks more cleanly made while the Borrelli has a bit of crinkling at the tip. 

For an affordable green knit, check out Mountain and Sackett. It’s made from a nice crunchy silk and is respectable width of 2.5 inches - nothing too wide or too narrow. I have the tie myself and the quality is excellent. 

I think green ties can be worn year-round, as long as it’s paired with the right items, but it’s especially nice for the Fall season. Since that’s approaching, if you already have items such as a grey suit, consider getting a green tie for yourself before September arrives. 

(Photo credits: top photo by Ethan Desu for The Armoury; bottom left photo by Kenneth Lim for The Armoury, bottom right photo by an unknown photographer)