This incredible embroidered silk nightcap was worn by an Englishman in the middle of the 16th century. According to the Smithsonian’s Object A Day blog, it was worn at home informally, but not to bed. What a spectacular thing.

This incredible embroidered silk nightcap was worn by an Englishman in the middle of the 16th century. According to the Smithsonian’s Object A Day blog, it was worn at home informally, but not to bed. What a spectacular thing.

How to Find Your Hat Size
Our new Put This On Ballcaps are fitted, and I’ve been surprised at how many folks don’t know their hat size. If you’re one of them, finding your size is easy. Here’s how:
Measure your head. This is easy to do with a soft tape measure like the one above (you can buy one in the sewing section of the 99 cent store if you like). You can also just use a string and then measure the string. Measure where you’d wear your hat - generally a few inches above your brow in the front and around the widest part of your skull in the back.
Divide the measurement (in inches) by pi. Pi, if you’re keeping track, is 3.14159. (Well, it’s longer than that, but that’s more than enough.) You’ll get a number - probably 7 and some fraction.
That’s it. That’s your hat size. Your hat size, essentially, is the diameter of your head. (Of course your head’s not a perfect circle, but nobody likes a pedant.)
Or, if you don’t like doing math, you can start with step one, then skip to alternate step two: googling “Hat Size Chart.”

How to Find Your Hat Size

Our new Put This On Ballcaps are fitted, and I’ve been surprised at how many folks don’t know their hat size. If you’re one of them, finding your size is easy. Here’s how:

  1. Measure your head. This is easy to do with a soft tape measure like the one above (you can buy one in the sewing section of the 99 cent store if you like). You can also just use a string and then measure the string. Measure where you’d wear your hat - generally a few inches above your brow in the front and around the widest part of your skull in the back.
  2. Divide the measurement (in inches) by pi. Pi, if you’re keeping track, is 3.14159. (Well, it’s longer than that, but that’s more than enough.) You’ll get a number - probably 7 and some fraction.
  3. That’s it. That’s your hat size. Your hat size, essentially, is the diameter of your head. (Of course your head’s not a perfect circle, but nobody likes a pedant.)

Or, if you don’t like doing math, you can start with step one, then skip to alternate step two: googling “Hat Size Chart.”

When Should You Take Off Your Hat?
It starts in a familiar way: I was in a nice restaurant, and there before me was a young guy, apparently on a date, wearing a ratty old baseball cap. Blech.
As a guy whose hair is on the way out, I’m an advocate of hat wearing, for practical reasons as much as aesthetic ones. It’s really hard to put sunscreen on the crown of your head, especially when there’s still hair there. So: a hat. But when should you take it off? Leaving aside religious considerations, here’s the basics for men:
Wear your hat outdoors, remove it indoors.
It’s OK to wear it indoors if you’re in transit or transition - so if for example you’re waiting for the subway, you’re fine. That also covers, say, the lobby of an office building or the people mover at the airport. In those cases, remove it when you get there.
You can remove your hat when speaking with a lady, particularly one you don’t know, but I don’t think anyone would expect as much of you in 2013. Same goes for removing it when a lady enters an elevator.
Hat tipping is generally an acknowledgement - it means thank you, or good day.
Hat are removed when respect calls for it - as when the national anthem is played, when a flag is lowered to half-mast or similar.
But it’s really simple: men’s hats are outerwear. Generally speaking, they’re on outside, and off inside.

When Should You Take Off Your Hat?

It starts in a familiar way: I was in a nice restaurant, and there before me was a young guy, apparently on a date, wearing a ratty old baseball cap. Blech.

As a guy whose hair is on the way out, I’m an advocate of hat wearing, for practical reasons as much as aesthetic ones. It’s really hard to put sunscreen on the crown of your head, especially when there’s still hair there. So: a hat. But when should you take it off? Leaving aside religious considerations, here’s the basics for men:

  • Wear your hat outdoors, remove it indoors.
  • It’s OK to wear it indoors if you’re in transit or transition - so if for example you’re waiting for the subway, you’re fine. That also covers, say, the lobby of an office building or the people mover at the airport. In those cases, remove it when you get there.
  • You can remove your hat when speaking with a lady, particularly one you don’t know, but I don’t think anyone would expect as much of you in 2013. Same goes for removing it when a lady enters an elevator.
  • Hat tipping is generally an acknowledgement - it means thank you, or good day.
  • Hat are removed when respect calls for it - as when the national anthem is played, when a flag is lowered to half-mast or similar.

But it’s really simple: men’s hats are outerwear. Generally speaking, they’re on outside, and off inside.

The Put This On Ballcap: Buy Yours Now
I’ve always been jealous of Yankees fans. Not only do they seem to buy their way into the World Series every year, but their hat goes with almost anything. Us Giants fans get a raw deal - orange and black goes with almost nothing, unless you happen to be a witch. Quite the quandary.
I created the Put This On ballcap to solve that problem. A simple icon and a classic color scheme; easy to wear every weekend. And it’s a collaboration with Cooperstown Ballcap, who make the finest caps in the world. That means gorgeous wool flannel and a durable, fitted leather sweatband. No plastic snapbacks or nylon mesh in our caps. And they’re made right here in the USA.
Quantities are very limited on this one, so if you want it, order now. Mine’s already seen some slow-pitch action, as you can see above.
SOLD OUT

The Put This On Ballcap: Buy Yours Now

I’ve always been jealous of Yankees fans. Not only do they seem to buy their way into the World Series every year, but their hat goes with almost anything. Us Giants fans get a raw deal - orange and black goes with almost nothing, unless you happen to be a witch. Quite the quandary.

I created the Put This On ballcap to solve that problem. A simple icon and a classic color scheme; easy to wear every weekend. And it’s a collaboration with Cooperstown Ballcap, who make the finest caps in the world. That means gorgeous wool flannel and a durable, fitted leather sweatband. No plastic snapbacks or nylon mesh in our caps. And they’re made right here in the USA.

Quantities are very limited on this one, so if you want it, order now. Mine’s already seen some slow-pitch action, as you can see above.

SOLD OUT

It’s turned to summer here in Los Angeles, so I did a quick inventory of my summer hats. One was a bit too tight, and one had a grease spot on the brim. I hopped in the car and headed up to Burbank, and Los Angeles’ only real hat shop, Baron’s.

This being the center of showbiz, Baron’s is probably best known for the hats they’ve made for Hollywood productions - you name a picture shot on the left coast involving hats, and Baron’s probably made them. They also make custom hats for retail customers and block, stretch and clean hats. They’re the only folks in Southern California who provide these services in-house, and one of a handful of shops in the country who do.

They told me they’re working on a big project, so my little projects won’t be ready to go for three or four weeks, but I’m grateful to have a local business who can do the work.

Here’s a local Chicago profile of Optimo Hats - easily the best retail hat store in the United States. A bonus: ever wondered what Tom Boddett looks like?

(Thanks, Mitchell)

jessethorn:

No big deal. Just me and Nardwuar the Human Serviette.

It’s rare that one meets a genuine style icon. Like Nardwuar.

jessethorn:

No big deal. Just me and Nardwuar the Human Serviette.

It’s rare that one meets a genuine style icon. Like Nardwuar.

I’ve recently gotten quite into Lock & Co., a famous British hatters that has been in business for over 300 years now (300 years!). The first things I bought from them were some tweed caps last winter, and just recently, I received my first trilby. They’re all fantastic. 
Anyway, while searching around the internet for more information about the company’s history, I came across this album of photos. Check it out when you have a chance. The images are lovely. 

I’ve recently gotten quite into Lock & Co., a famous British hatters that has been in business for over 300 years now (300 years!). The first things I bought from them were some tweed caps last winter, and just recently, I received my first trilby. They’re all fantastic. 

Anyway, while searching around the internet for more information about the company’s history, I came across this album of photos. Check it out when you have a chance. The images are lovely. 

Regular Put This On readers know that I have a special place in my heart for the baseball cap. It’s rare that you’ll find me outdoors on weekends without one, and my favorite manufacturer, by far, is Cooperstown Ballcap Co.
Sadly, Cooperstown Ballcap lost its license to produce replica MLB caps, which was the core of their business. These days, they make 19th-century and international baseball hats, among other products, as Ideal Cap Co.
I’ve been corresponding with Cooperstown Ballcap’s owner, and we’re going to be making a very special product this spring: the PTO cap. My favorite ballclub is the San Francisco Giants, and their orange-and-black cap goes with almost nothing, so I’ve been looking for a high-quality, simple cap to wear for a decade or so. I finally decided to design one myself.
Our hats, which we’ll be offering in a very limited quantity this spring, feature a very simple design in a very wearable colorway. They have soft crowns, like the hats of the 1930s, 40s and 50s, and their made of premium wool flannel with a leather sweatband. No snapback here. They’re the absolute best ballcap you can buy.
Look for our collaboration with Cooperstown Ballcap early in the baseball season… then wear it all summer.

Regular Put This On readers know that I have a special place in my heart for the baseball cap. It’s rare that you’ll find me outdoors on weekends without one, and my favorite manufacturer, by far, is Cooperstown Ballcap Co.

Sadly, Cooperstown Ballcap lost its license to produce replica MLB caps, which was the core of their business. These days, they make 19th-century and international baseball hats, among other products, as Ideal Cap Co.

I’ve been corresponding with Cooperstown Ballcap’s owner, and we’re going to be making a very special product this spring: the PTO cap. My favorite ballclub is the San Francisco Giants, and their orange-and-black cap goes with almost nothing, so I’ve been looking for a high-quality, simple cap to wear for a decade or so. I finally decided to design one myself.

Our hats, which we’ll be offering in a very limited quantity this spring, feature a very simple design in a very wearable colorway. They have soft crowns, like the hats of the 1930s, 40s and 50s, and their made of premium wool flannel with a leather sweatband. No snapback here. They’re the absolute best ballcap you can buy.

Look for our collaboration with Cooperstown Ballcap early in the baseball season… then wear it all summer.

What better day than today, as the 49ers take on the Packers, to pay tribute to the team’s #1 fan, “Banjo Man,” aka “Super Niner,” aka Stacy Samuels. For the past 30 years, he’s roamed the aisles at every 49ers home game, plucking and cheering for the red and gold. (Not to mention quite a few Warriors, A’s and Giants games.)
Samuels’ signature propeller beanie comes courtesy of his own company, Interstellar Propeller - so if you’re inspired, you can get one yourself. I must admit that I had one as a kid, and I’m not alone - apparently he’s sold more than a million and a half over the years. That’s a man who knows how to accessorize.
Oh… and GO NINERS!

What better day than today, as the 49ers take on the Packers, to pay tribute to the team’s #1 fan, “Banjo Man,” aka “Super Niner,” aka Stacy Samuels. For the past 30 years, he’s roamed the aisles at every 49ers home game, plucking and cheering for the red and gold. (Not to mention quite a few Warriors, A’s and Giants games.)

Samuels’ signature propeller beanie comes courtesy of his own company, Interstellar Propeller - so if you’re inspired, you can get one yourself. I must admit that I had one as a kid, and I’m not alone - apparently he’s sold more than a million and a half over the years. That’s a man who knows how to accessorize.

Oh… and GO NINERS!