Kickstarter of Interest: Gustin denim
Last week a Kickstarter project came to our attention from the team at Gustin, who is offering their denim at wholesale prices direct to pre-sale customers instead of selling to retailers. The project met its fundraising goal on the first day. 
If you back the project for $81, then you can receive a pair of selvedge denim jeans made in San Francisco from fabric from White Oak Cone Mills. Compared to several other made-in-the-U.S.A. raw denim brands at retail, that’s under half what you’d typically see.
Personally, none of us here have had hands-on experience with Gustin denim, so we can’t fully comment on things such as fit and construction. There is a sizing chart here, which you can use to compare to other pairs of jeans you may own. For some insight from people who have tried on a pair, Gus at A Bit of Color had some thoughts as does Mark at Simpler Man.
I also wondered about the possibilities of returns or exchanges for Gustin’s Kickstarter backers. Here’s the response I received from Stephen at Gustin:




We’re not going to officially allow returns or exchanges (Kickstarter makes it quite difficult), but we’ll do our best to facilitate swapping of sizes if there’s an issue. After Kickstarter - absolutely. The goal is to have free shipping both ways. It’ll work like Zappos - you can order 3 styles in 3 sizes, and just keep what fits.




I personally think the idea of crowd-funding is an interesting approach to addressing the cost issue of raw denim (and apparently so do more than 800 other people backing the project). I’d just caution looking over the size chart carefully and making sure the fit works for your needs. 
-Kiyoshi

Kickstarter of Interest: Gustin denim

Last week a Kickstarter project came to our attention from the team at Gustin, who is offering their denim at wholesale prices direct to pre-sale customers instead of selling to retailers. The project met its fundraising goal on the first day. 

If you back the project for $81, then you can receive a pair of selvedge denim jeans made in San Francisco from fabric from White Oak Cone Mills. Compared to several other made-in-the-U.S.A. raw denim brands at retail, that’s under half what you’d typically see.

Personally, none of us here have had hands-on experience with Gustin denim, so we can’t fully comment on things such as fit and construction. There is a sizing chart here, which you can use to compare to other pairs of jeans you may own. For some insight from people who have tried on a pair, Gus at A Bit of Color had some thoughts as does Mark at Simpler Man.

I also wondered about the possibilities of returns or exchanges for Gustin’s Kickstarter backers. Here’s the response I received from Stephen at Gustin:

We’re not going to officially allow returns or exchanges (Kickstarter makes it quite difficult), but we’ll do our best to facilitate swapping of sizes if there’s an issue. After Kickstarter - absolutely. The goal is to have free shipping both ways. It’ll work like Zappos - you can order 3 styles in 3 sizes, and just keep what fits.

I personally think the idea of crowd-funding is an interesting approach to addressing the cost issue of raw denim (and apparently so do more than 800 other people backing the project). I’d just caution looking over the size chart carefully and making sure the fit works for your needs. 

-Kiyoshi

We get a lot of questions from women who want to wear men’s suits, but have a hard time with the fitting. Some women have bodies that work decently with menswear, but the honest truth is that it’s hard to fit a woman’s body into a men’s suit - they’re very differently shaped, and the suit is an unforgiving garment. I usually recommend that women and trans folks with feminine bodies just go custom, but that can obviously be prohibitively expensive.

This cool Kickstarter project, Saint Harridan, aims to change that. Their goal is to produce reasonably-priced suiting, shirts and ties for people with womanly bodies but masculine fashion senses. I’m not aware of any off-the-rack options for these folks, and I think it’d be a big step forward. A pledge of just $540 gets you a suit if they’re produced, and that strikes me as a worthwhile investment. Good luck, Saint Harridan!

O’Mast Kickstarter Campaign and First Screening
O’Mast, the long-awaited documentary about Neapolitan tailoring, just started a Kickstarter campaign. If you’ve been reading men’s style blogs for any period of time, you’re probably already familiar with the film. If you’re not, however, you should immediately check out the trailer. I also conducted an interview with the director, Gianluca Migliarotti, which you can read here.
The film is finished, but the director needs some funds in order to pay for some postproduction work that has already been done, make the DVD, and go on tour for some screening parties. I can’t express enough how important I think this film will be, and how much recognition it deserves. To my knowledge, there are no other films about Neapolitan tailoring, and this one captures some of the most important figures in the region. 
Any donation will be accepted, but certain pledges will be met with special gifts. Perhaps most notable is that a pledge of $25 will get you a copy of the DVD. Heck, at that point, you’re just buying an advanced copy of what’s sure to be a popular film.
Finally, if you happen to live in New York City, I have some really exciting news. The first screening of O’Mast will be held at Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò, the home of the Department of Italian Studies at New York University. The screening will take place on November 30th at 6 PM. You can see it on the department’s calendar of events. I don’t know how many seats the venue accommodates, so to be safe, I would recommend you show up early.

O’Mast Kickstarter Campaign and First Screening

O’Mast, the long-awaited documentary about Neapolitan tailoring, just started a Kickstarter campaign. If you’ve been reading men’s style blogs for any period of time, you’re probably already familiar with the film. If you’re not, however, you should immediately check out the trailer. I also conducted an interview with the director, Gianluca Migliarotti, which you can read here.

The film is finished, but the director needs some funds in order to pay for some postproduction work that has already been done, make the DVD, and go on tour for some screening parties. I can’t express enough how important I think this film will be, and how much recognition it deserves. To my knowledge, there are no other films about Neapolitan tailoring, and this one captures some of the most important figures in the region. 

Any donation will be accepted, but certain pledges will be met with special gifts. Perhaps most notable is that a pledge of $25 will get you a copy of the DVD. Heck, at that point, you’re just buying an advanced copy of what’s sure to be a popular film.

Finally, if you happen to live in New York City, I have some really exciting news. The first screening of O’Mast will be held at Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò, the home of the Department of Italian Studies at New York University. The screening will take place on November 30th at 6 PM. You can see it on the department’s calendar of events. I don’t know how many seats the venue accommodates, so to be safe, I would recommend you show up early.

The kind folks at the Kickstarter blog asked if I would take a look at some pictures they shot of some volunteers from their development staff and offer some critique. I was game for the challenge, and they just posted my thoughts up on their site. I’ve avoided makeovers for two years, but there’s a time for everything, right?

The kind folks at the Kickstarter blog asked if I would take a look at some pictures they shot of some volunteers from their development staff and offer some critique. I was game for the challenge, and they just posted my thoughts up on their site. I’ve avoided makeovers for two years, but there’s a time for everything, right?

Kickstart Put This On Season Two!

Put This On is a web series about dressing like a grown-up. In our first series, we took on big ideas in men’s style. We met men who personified elegance, craft and aesthetic passion. We even shared a few goofy tips and tricks.For series two, we’re going to take on the big places. Three world style capitals, selected by our viewers.

This time, we’re doing it professional-style. We’ll be bringing me—the host, Jesse, Thorn—plus a director and a producer to these three cities. There, we’ll crew up and investigate what makes these cities so special. We’ll probably make some stupid jokes, too.

Travel and crew costs are no joke, of course. Our fundraising goal is $68,000. From that, we plan to make at least two episodes in every city we visit, and pay for equipment, staff time, shooting and editing. We’ve got tons of rewards—the folks who pay for our videos are producers, and we credit everyone. We’ve also got some fun stuff on offer, so be sure to check out the list. If you’re a business and you’d like to sponsor the series or an episode, we can make that happen, too—email us at contact@putthison.com.

Kickstarter’s principles are simple: if we don’t meet our goal, you won’t pay anything, and we won’t get anything. If you want to see season two of our show, we’ve got to make this happen.

Everything that’s gone right with Put This On has come from our viewers. We’ve brought the invitation to fund season two directly to you, and we hope you can fulfill it. If you want to see Put This On take on the world, support season two, now.

Thank you!
Thanks to the generous pledges of 317 Put This On viewer/reader/donors, we’ve raised enough money to make Put This On Season One!
We’re so happy that this kind of funding for media really works.  For independent independents like us, there’s no other practical way to do it, and this was really a home run.
So… from here…
If you haven’t pledged yet, our Kickstarter is still open for business for 7 more days.  Buy in!
If you’re interested in sponsoring our videos or website, email us.
Keep your eyes here and on Twitter for updates on our filming, and look for six new episodes in the first six months of 2010!

Thank you!

Thanks to the generous pledges of 317 Put This On viewer/reader/donors, we’ve raised enough money to make Put This On Season One!

We’re so happy that this kind of funding for media really works.  For independent independents like us, there’s no other practical way to do it, and this was really a home run.

So… from here…

If you haven’t pledged yet, our Kickstarter is still open for business for 7 more days.  Buy in!

If you’re interested in sponsoring our videos or website, email us.

Keep your eyes here and on Twitter for updates on our filming, and look for six new episodes in the first six months of 2010!

Season One Update
As of this writing, 163 Put This On fans have pledged money towards the production of Season One of the show.  Many have given $3 or $5.  Many have given hundreds.  Thank you!  So far, we’ve got over $9300 pledged towards our $15,000 goal.
We decided to fund Put This On directly because we didn’t want to have to worry about the vicissitudes of the ad marketplace or finding a Big Media co-producer.  We’re not against sponsorship (and indeed, if you want to sponsor Season One, email us), but we never wanted to have to chose between not getting to make our shows and including a scene about Cisco Telepresence.  We want to do this on our terms - and we think our terms are what’s best for you, too.
We freely admit that this is an experiment.  Just about 50,000 people have watched our pilot, and thousands visit the site every day.  We know you like what we’re making.  We think you want to see more.  But will you pay for it?
So we say: make a pledge.  You only have to actually give up the money if we actually raise enough to make Season One.  And then you get what you paid for - six awesome new episodes of PTO.

Season One Update

As of this writing, 163 Put This On fans have pledged money towards the production of Season One of the show.  Many have given $3 or $5.  Many have given hundreds.  Thank you!  So far, we’ve got over $9300 pledged towards our $15,000 goal.

We decided to fund Put This On directly because we didn’t want to have to worry about the vicissitudes of the ad marketplace or finding a Big Media co-producer.  We’re not against sponsorship (and indeed, if you want to sponsor Season One, email us), but we never wanted to have to chose between not getting to make our shows and including a scene about Cisco Telepresence.  We want to do this on our terms - and we think our terms are what’s best for you, too.

We freely admit that this is an experiment.  Just about 50,000 people have watched our pilot, and thousands visit the site every day.  We know you like what we’re making.  We think you want to see more.  But will you pay for it?

So we say: make a pledge.  You only have to actually give up the money if we actually raise enough to make Season One.  And then you get what you paid for - six awesome new episodes of PTO.

Kickstarting Season One
We didn’t make our pilot with the idea that we’d shut down this operation immediately thereafter. Here in my office, I’ve got a jumbo-sized whiteboard full of ideas for future episodes of Put This On. We were sure we wanted to keep doing this. The only thing we weren’t sure about was how we were going to pay for it.
Both Adam and myself have real-life jobs, and making an episode of Put This On is a lot of work. Especially for Adam—three weeks or so between pre-production, shooting and editing. We love it, but we have to make money at it. We have to buy equipment, too, and pay people who help us, and pay for some travel. And if you saw the first episode, you know that Adam could use some re-grouting in his bathtub. (Just kidding, he rents, nothing he can do about it, please stop talking about it.)
We didn’t expect the funding for our pilot to come through, but people who believed in us stepped up and paid for it. So while we thought about a variety of ways to fund season one, in the end, we figured we should ask you. We get the impression that you liked it enough to give a few bucks to see more. Isn’t that how the future of media is supposed to work?

Once again, we’re using Kickstarter, and we’ve set a budget of $15,000 for a first season of six episodes, which (if funded) we’ll present over the first six months or so of 2010. That money represents some capital investments (cameras and lenses and whatnot), some travel costs (we’ve got out-of-town plans), and a minimal rate of pay for Adam and myself (about ten or twelve bucks an hour). Maybe we’ll get a sponsorship or something and we’ll make more money, but we really want to do this and we don’t want to ask too much of you, so we kept it to a bare minimum.
This remains very much an experiment. $15,000 is a lot of money, no matter how you slice it, but with your help, giving and spreading the word, we think we can do it. Based on the feedback we’ve gotten from our pilot, we think you want us to make more, and are willing to put a little green behind that sentiment. So we figure we’ll give it a shot: you want more, we want to make more, let’s do it!
Kickstarter has our many inducements to giving (including your own PTO jumpsuit!), and super-easy instructions on how to go about doing so. So kick us a few bucks, and tell a friend!

Kickstarting Season One

We didn’t make our pilot with the idea that we’d shut down this operation immediately thereafter. Here in my office, I’ve got a jumbo-sized whiteboard full of ideas for future episodes of Put This On. We were sure we wanted to keep doing this. The only thing we weren’t sure about was how we were going to pay for it.

Both Adam and myself have real-life jobs, and making an episode of Put This On is a lot of work. Especially for Adam—three weeks or so between pre-production, shooting and editing. We love it, but we have to make money at it. We have to buy equipment, too, and pay people who help us, and pay for some travel. And if you saw the first episode, you know that Adam could use some re-grouting in his bathtub. (Just kidding, he rents, nothing he can do about it, please stop talking about it.)

We didn’t expect the funding for our pilot to come through, but people who believed in us stepped up and paid for it. So while we thought about a variety of ways to fund season one, in the end, we figured we should ask you. We get the impression that you liked it enough to give a few bucks to see more. Isn’t that how the future of media is supposed to work?

Once again, we’re using Kickstarter, and we’ve set a budget of $15,000 for a first season of six episodes, which (if funded) we’ll present over the first six months or so of 2010. That money represents some capital investments (cameras and lenses and whatnot), some travel costs (we’ve got out-of-town plans), and a minimal rate of pay for Adam and myself (about ten or twelve bucks an hour). Maybe we’ll get a sponsorship or something and we’ll make more money, but we really want to do this and we don’t want to ask too much of you, so we kept it to a bare minimum.

This remains very much an experiment. $15,000 is a lot of money, no matter how you slice it, but with your help, giving and spreading the word, we think we can do it. Based on the feedback we’ve gotten from our pilot, we think you want us to make more, and are willing to put a little green behind that sentiment. So we figure we’ll give it a shot: you want more, we want to make more, let’s do it!

Kickstarter has our many inducements to giving (including your own PTO jumpsuit!), and super-easy instructions on how to go about doing so. So kick us a few bucks, and tell a friend!