It’s On Sale: LL Bean Boots
LL Bean is having a 10% off sale with the checkout code SPRING10 until Monday. It’s not much, but they don’t do sales often, and when they do, it’s not much more than 10%. Their Bean boots have become a bit of an internet trend in the last few years, but for good reason. They have a lot of Northeastern charm, they’re relatively affordable, and they’re damn useful in the rain. Which comes just in time since next month is April showers.
Be sure to pay attention to the sizing information on their website. I wear a 9D in most shoes, and with thin socks, I fit perfectly into a size 8 of their 8” boots with Thinsulate.

It’s On Sale: LL Bean Boots

LL Bean is having a 10% off sale with the checkout code SPRING10 until Monday. It’s not much, but they don’t do sales often, and when they do, it’s not much more than 10%. Their Bean boots have become a bit of an internet trend in the last few years, but for good reason. They have a lot of Northeastern charm, they’re relatively affordable, and they’re damn useful in the rain. Which comes just in time since next month is April showers.

Be sure to pay attention to the sizing information on their website. I wear a 9D in most shoes, and with thin socks, I fit perfectly into a size 8 of their 8” boots with Thinsulate.

Replacement boot laces
For several years now I’ve appreciated the ruggedness of my L.L. Bean Boots for winter. They’ve held up quite well in rain, snow, slush and that slurry of dirt, melted snow and rock salt that seems to stick around well after the storms are gone. 
But I can’t say I’ve been impressed with the stock laces that came with my Bean Boots. Perhaps I was an outlier, but both began to fray and fail the very first winter I wore them. In a pinch, I decided to pick up a pair of Kiwi leather laces at the local Walmart. Those lasted at least a winter until a few weeks ago when I went to lace up my boots and one of them snapped in my hand while tightening them. Perhaps that accounts for their 2-star rating on Amazon. 
I spent a bit more time doing some research and came across an old, 2009 post from Sartorially Inclined (R.I.P.) on Danner boot laces. Price has gone up a buck (now $6), but I figured they’re worth a shot. I’m hoping they’ll stay together for more than a year. Perhaps I should’ve just bought two pairs to have a spare. 
My friend also recommended a good idea: paracord, which was used by the U.S. military for their parachute lines. You can usually buy a significant length of it for a few bucks at your local military surplus store. Simply cut to length and burn the ends with a lighter to keep them from fraying at the tip. 
-Kiyoshi

Replacement boot laces

For several years now I’ve appreciated the ruggedness of my L.L. Bean Boots for winter. They’ve held up quite well in rain, snow, slush and that slurry of dirt, melted snow and rock salt that seems to stick around well after the storms are gone. 

But I can’t say I’ve been impressed with the stock laces that came with my Bean Boots. Perhaps I was an outlier, but both began to fray and fail the very first winter I wore them. In a pinch, I decided to pick up a pair of Kiwi leather laces at the local Walmart. Those lasted at least a winter until a few weeks ago when I went to lace up my boots and one of them snapped in my hand while tightening them. Perhaps that accounts for their 2-star rating on Amazon. 

I spent a bit more time doing some research and came across an old, 2009 post from Sartorially Inclined (R.I.P.) on Danner boot laces. Price has gone up a buck (now $6), but I figured they’re worth a shot. I’m hoping they’ll stay together for more than a year. Perhaps I should’ve just bought two pairs to have a spare. 

My friend also recommended a good idea: paracord, which was used by the U.S. military for their parachute lines. You can usually buy a significant length of it for a few bucks at your local military surplus store. Simply cut to length and burn the ends with a lighter to keep them from fraying at the tip. 

-Kiyoshi

It’s on Sale: Best of Black Friday Deals on Wardrobe Basics

Our list of Thanksgiving holiday sales and discount codes continues to grow and be updated. Black Friday deals are hard to judge if they’re the best best price you’ll see on an item, however, it’s usually a good time to purchase items that fall under the umbrella of wardrobe basics that don’t go on end-of-season clearance. 

The 30% off sale at Lands’ End produces several great deals, especially if you stack it with their clearance section, but it’s a good time to get a deal on basics, too. Their Hyde Park OCBDs come to $34.30 — just use code WONDERLAND with PIN 2126

3sixteen has their raw selvedge denim on sale. Offering 10% off might not seem like a huge deal, but it’s rare they ever discount their jeans — in fact, they often sell out and the price keeps going up for a pair at retail ever year. I’m a huge fan of their SL-100x and Derek’s also praised his pair as well, too. Price comes to $198 with code BF2012 and sale ends tonight.

And if you need a cheaper pair of jeans, Levi’s 501s are 40% off with code BLKFRI, bringing their dark-rinse pair to $46.80. 

If you live in a place that snows and don’t have winter boots yet, then I’d recommend picking up a pair of L.L.Bean Boots, which are on sale for $89.10 with code THANKS10, which knocks 10% off and you get free shipping. They’ve lasted me through two Chicago winters and will probably last many more. 

If you need neckwear, The Knottery’s 25% off (code: GOBBLE) sale gives you silk knit ties for $18.75 and silk grenadines for $41.25 — both are an incredible deal. Derek’s reviewed both previously. 

If you’re looking for affordable chinos, Ralph Lauren’s “Preston” chinos are on sale for $44.99 and come with free shipping. Four colors and a whole bunch of sizes still in stock. 

Finally, if you’ve been thinking of getting a Barbour waxed cotton jacket, check out End Clothing’s selection. They’re offering 25% off your entire order and they deduct VAT for U.S. customers. That brings a jacket like the Ashby to $198.75. 

downeastandout:

Beanbag

Simple, durable and well-made gets better with time. As you can see.

downeastandout:

Beanbag

Simple, durable and well-made gets better with time. As you can see.

(Source: downeastandout, via abitofcolor)

Q and Answer: The Chamois ShirtKyle asks: How can you make a chamois shirt work in your fall wardrobe?It’s easy!  Just wear it!If you don’t already know, chamois shirts aren’t actually made from the same materially as the chamois you might use to buff your car - soft suede.  Instead, they’re made of thick, soft flannel which has a suede-like finish.  It’s a classic product of mildly outdoorsy classic clothing outfitters like say Lands’ End.It took me a while to find my favorite chamois shirt.  I’d been looking for a year or two when I stumbled upon it.  It’s an LL Bean, probably ten or fifteen years old but looking pretty good.  I almost didn’t try it on, because it’s a medium, and I’m 6’3” and a bit over 200 pounds.  I haven’t worn a medium since I was 12.  Luckily, Bean’s sizing is so generous that it fits comfortably.  It’s burgundy, which is a very easy to wear color, and flatters my complexion.  I paid $12 for it, as I recall, which is a lot for a shirt at the thrift store, but I’m glad I did.
It’s perfect as a light, casual cover up.  I find that it gets me comfortably through an evening dog walk here in Southern California - temperatures in the 60s or so.  Do wear it on top of another shirt, like a light jacket, not as a base layer, unless it’s really, really cold out and your confident in your ability to pull off the “Beefy Mainer” look.  As a shirt, it can make you look heavy; as a jacket, it’s almost slimming.  I wear it over an oxford-cloth button down with jeans or khakis.

Q and Answer: The Chamois Shirt

Kyle asks: How can you make a chamois shirt work in your fall wardrobe?

It’s easy!  Just wear it!

If you don’t already know, chamois shirts aren’t actually made from the same materially as the chamois you might use to buff your car - soft suede.  Instead, they’re made of thick, soft flannel which has a suede-like finish.  It’s a classic product of mildly outdoorsy classic clothing outfitters like say Lands’ End.

It took me a while to find my favorite chamois shirt.  I’d been looking for a year or two when I stumbled upon it.  It’s an LL Bean, probably ten or fifteen years old but looking pretty good.  I almost didn’t try it on, because it’s a medium, and I’m 6’3” and a bit over 200 pounds.  I haven’t worn a medium since I was 12.  Luckily, Bean’s sizing is so generous that it fits comfortably.  It’s burgundy, which is a very easy to wear color, and flatters my complexion.  I paid $12 for it, as I recall, which is a lot for a shirt at the thrift store, but I’m glad I did.

It’s perfect as a light, casual cover up.  I find that it gets me comfortably through an evening dog walk here in Southern California - temperatures in the 60s or so.  Do wear it on top of another shirt, like a light jacket, not as a base layer, unless it’s really, really cold out and your confident in your ability to pull off the “Beefy Mainer” look.  As a shirt, it can make you look heavy; as a jacket, it’s almost slimming.  I wear it over an oxford-cloth button down with jeans or khakis.

It’s On Sale
L.L. Bean Signature Cotton Marine Supply Sweater
$49.50 from $99 on LLBean.com

It’s On Sale

L.L. Bean Signature Cotton Marine Supply Sweater

$49.50 from $99 on LLBean.com

It’s On eBay
L.L. Bean Waxed Cotton Down Vest
$70 or best offer, ends Wednesday

It’s On eBay

L.L. Bean Waxed Cotton Down Vest

$70 or best offer, ends Wednesday

Q and Answer: Clothing for the Field
Michael asks:  I’m a biology student and as my classes become more advanced, more  field work becomes involved. This means trekking through woods, wading  in streams, getting on all fours to collect mushrooms, or turning over  rocks to look for insects. Is there something I can wear for all of this  that is fashionable and practical? I’ve no problem dressing myself well  out of the field, but I’d like to look a cut above the traditional  jeans, sneakers, and t-shirt that are prevalent in the field.
Right now, Michael, thousands of cool kids are sitting in pools of their own drool, wishing they had an opportunity like this.  At this moment, nothing is cooler than classic field clothing, and you have the chance to wear it for reasons beyond simple fashion.  Enjoy yourself.
The best outdoor clothing has a hundred-year-plus history.  The clothing that British ramblers and American sportsmen wore in the 1920s, ’30s and ’40s remains just as functional and beautiful now as it was then.
Spend some time with brands like Filson, Barbour and Orvis.  Look for vintage pieces from companies like L.L. Bean and Abercrombie & Fitch which made fine quality outdoor clothing for many years before turning mallward. (Even now, the real outdoor and hunter’s clothing at Bean is some of the best they make.)
My advice is to focus on a simple kit.  Buy some great khaki pants, some solid shirts, a wool shirt or two, a great knit, a Barbour or Filson coat, a pair of amazing field boots and a pair of boots for wet work.  The outerwear in particular should last a lifetime with proper care.  Take care with fit - contemporary style suggests a closer fit than most legacy brands offer - this can be corrected with careful sizing or a bit of tailoring.  There’s no need to go overboard in this direction, though, if you plan to keep your gear for decades.  And remember: all the most durable items in your kit are probably available used.

Q and Answer: Clothing for the Field

Michael asks: I’m a biology student and as my classes become more advanced, more field work becomes involved. This means trekking through woods, wading in streams, getting on all fours to collect mushrooms, or turning over rocks to look for insects. Is there something I can wear for all of this that is fashionable and practical? I’ve no problem dressing myself well out of the field, but I’d like to look a cut above the traditional jeans, sneakers, and t-shirt that are prevalent in the field.

Right now, Michael, thousands of cool kids are sitting in pools of their own drool, wishing they had an opportunity like this.  At this moment, nothing is cooler than classic field clothing, and you have the chance to wear it for reasons beyond simple fashion.  Enjoy yourself.

The best outdoor clothing has a hundred-year-plus history.  The clothing that British ramblers and American sportsmen wore in the 1920s, ’30s and ’40s remains just as functional and beautiful now as it was then.

Spend some time with brands like Filson, Barbour and Orvis.  Look for vintage pieces from companies like L.L. Bean and Abercrombie & Fitch which made fine quality outdoor clothing for many years before turning mallward. (Even now, the real outdoor and hunter’s clothing at Bean is some of the best they make.)

My advice is to focus on a simple kit.  Buy some great khaki pants, some solid shirts, a wool shirt or two, a great knit, a Barbour or Filson coat, a pair of amazing field boots and a pair of boots for wet work.  The outerwear in particular should last a lifetime with proper care.  Take care with fit - contemporary style suggests a closer fit than most legacy brands offer - this can be corrected with careful sizing or a bit of tailoring.  There’s no need to go overboard in this direction, though, if you plan to keep your gear for decades.  And remember: all the most durable items in your kit are probably available used.

It’s On Sale
L.L. Bean Town and Field Pants, Brushed Twill
Also on sale are the wool flannel version.  Both are excellent utility pants.  I had some coupons for LL Bean, and went back and forth about which to get, until I finally ended up getting one of these.
$29.99 (Originally $59.50)

It’s On Sale

L.L. Bean Town and Field Pants, Brushed Twill

Also on sale are the wool flannel version.  Both are excellent utility pants.  I had some coupons for LL Bean, and went back and forth about which to get, until I finally ended up getting one of these.

$29.99 (Originally $59.50)

LL Bean Handsewn Blucher Moccasin
LL Bean’s Blucher Moccasin is a great option for those of you looking for an alternative to sneakers and boat shoes for casual wear.  They look good both with and without socks, and they’re only $69, with Bean’s famous no-questions-asked warranty.  Great with jeans or chinos - just make sure those chinos aren’t big flappy pleaty dad-style numbers, or the shoes will look dad-ly, too.
(photo via)

LL Bean Handsewn Blucher Moccasin

LL Bean’s Blucher Moccasin is a great option for those of you looking for an alternative to sneakers and boat shoes for casual wear.  They look good both with and without socks, and they’re only $69, with Bean’s famous no-questions-asked warranty.  Great with jeans or chinos - just make sure those chinos aren’t big flappy pleaty dad-style numbers, or the shoes will look dad-ly, too.

(photo via)