A Simple Summer Look
I love this Apparel Arts illustration. I found it last year on an online men’s clothing forum, and put it in my head to try to find similar pieces. Unfortunately, by the time I did, summer had already passed. This year, however, I’ll be wearing this on more than a few occasions once the weather gets hot (though, I’ll probably leave the ascot and pipe to more dashing men).
The great thing about this is how stylish it looks with just a few simple pieces. To get something like this for yourself, consider this long-sleeved polo from Kent Wang. Though not technically the same as what you see above, I think long sleeves rolled up look better than short ones. I also find that long sleeved polos have the advantage of being able to do double duty underneath sport coats. They show the bit of requisite shirt cuff underneath the jacket sleeve, and ensure that no bare wrists will be exposed when you move your arms. If you want something sportier, however, Kent has a number of short sleeve options as well.
The upside to Kent’s polos is that they have a few “button up shirt details” that make them look a bit smarter than your average tennis shirt. The collar band, for example, is reinforced, so the collar doesn’t flop down and lay flat against your shoulder (like you’d see on most polos). The downside, however, is that they fit very slim and the sleeves can be a bit tight. Kent has measurements posted though, and he accepts returns.
For other options, Jesse has recommended Lands’ End. I also really like this new polo at The Armoury, which I believe was made for them by Ascot Chang. To order one, you’ll have to call or email their store (expect the price to be higher than either Kent’s or Lands’ End).
Tan trousers are harder to find. For mine, I bought a pair of flannel ones from Howard Yount, but they’re sold out now and won’t be restocking until fall. Flannel has a bit of richness and mottling that’ll help keep this from looking like a Best Buy employee uniform. You can find something similar at the moment at O’Connell’s and J Press, the second of which is having a sale right now. And though they’re not tan, these Pantas look fantastic. Their prices aren’t cheap, but their pants are some of the highest quality you’ll find in the ready-to-wear market.  
Finally, for the creped-soled shoes, consider some of the options I mentioned a few weeks ago. I think pair of sueded, dark brown chukkas with rubber crepe soles here would look great.

A Simple Summer Look

I love this Apparel Arts illustration. I found it last year on an online men’s clothing forum, and put it in my head to try to find similar pieces. Unfortunately, by the time I did, summer had already passed. This year, however, I’ll be wearing this on more than a few occasions once the weather gets hot (though, I’ll probably leave the ascot and pipe to more dashing men).

The great thing about this is how stylish it looks with just a few simple pieces. To get something like this for yourself, consider this long-sleeved polo from Kent Wang. Though not technically the same as what you see above, I think long sleeves rolled up look better than short ones. I also find that long sleeved polos have the advantage of being able to do double duty underneath sport coats. They show the bit of requisite shirt cuff underneath the jacket sleeve, and ensure that no bare wrists will be exposed when you move your arms. If you want something sportier, however, Kent has a number of short sleeve options as well.

The upside to Kent’s polos is that they have a few “button up shirt details” that make them look a bit smarter than your average tennis shirt. The collar band, for example, is reinforced, so the collar doesn’t flop down and lay flat against your shoulder (like you’d see on most polos). The downside, however, is that they fit very slim and the sleeves can be a bit tight. Kent has measurements posted though, and he accepts returns.

For other options, Jesse has recommended Lands’ End. I also really like this new polo at The Armoury, which I believe was made for them by Ascot Chang. To order one, you’ll have to call or email their store (expect the price to be higher than either Kent’s or Lands’ End).

Tan trousers are harder to find. For mine, I bought a pair of flannel ones from Howard Yount, but they’re sold out now and won’t be restocking until fall. Flannel has a bit of richness and mottling that’ll help keep this from looking like a Best Buy employee uniform. You can find something similar at the moment at O’Connell’s and J Press, the second of which is having a sale right now. And though they’re not tan, these Pantas look fantastic. Their prices aren’t cheap, but their pants are some of the highest quality you’ll find in the ready-to-wear market.  

Finally, for the creped-soled shoes, consider some of the options I mentioned a few weeks ago. I think pair of sueded, dark brown chukkas with rubber crepe soles here would look great.

Four Socks for Summer

For much of the year, I rely on navy wool over-the-calf socks. As many readers will know, I favor over-the-calfs because they stay up on your leg, thus ensuring your bare calves won’t be exposed when you sit down. I also find navy is a slightly more interesting color than black, and can be successfully paired with almost any kind of trouser.

In the summer months, however, long wool socks can wear a bit too warm, so I turn to other options. The first are still navy over-the-calfs, but instead of wool, I’ve come to really appreciate the highly breathable cotton ones sold by Dapper Classics. They sent me a few pairs for free last year and I’m really pleased with how well they’ve held up. Like with many high-end socks, however, I’ve found that solid colors hold up much better than patterns. For whatever reason, high end patterned socks seem to fuzz up and fall apart more easily in the wash. Still, their solid navy is made with a very durable, breathable weave, and you can feel the air whiff by when you put these on and wiggle your feet.

Another popular option is no-show socks, which Jesse has written about before. They’re essentially a short cotton sock that allows you get the look of being sockless without actually having to be so. In addition to the ones Jesse named, 2(x)ist also just released a collection of no-show socks. I have no experience with them, though I’m told they have a rubber grip at the heel that helps prevent slippage. Jesse also reviewed the Mocc Socks he named in his original article, and liked them.

I tried no-show socks a couple of years ago and sadly found they just didn’t work for me. Mine had rubber grips as well, but they still kept slipping off. So I’ve turned to terry cloth insoles from Aldos, which you can slip into your shoes whenever you want to go sockless. If your feet get sweaty easily, sprinkle in a little Gold Bond powder to keep them cool and dry. 

Finally, summer being what it is, I like to wear sneakers a bit more often on the weekends. Dress socks are a bit weird with sneakers, so I pair mine with more casual cotton socks. Like Jesse, mine are from Lands’ End and Uniqlo. I’ve found the ones from Lands’ End hold up a bit better, though I like Uniqlo’s designs (mine are these in grey). Get whichever ones you like best, though I recommend staying away from the white ones. Those just look too much like athletic tube socks, which in my opinion, should be worn only when you’re exercising.  

The OCBD Shirt Series, Part VI: Our Recommendations
After reviewing so many companies, we thought it’d be useful to say which we recommend the most. Obviously much depends on your taste, build, and budget. The great thing about having such a varied market, however, is that there’s almost something for everyone. 
If you want something traditional, I recommend either Mercer & Sons or O’Connell’s. Mercer & Sons has a great oxford cloth that’s a bit more variegated in color and nubby in texture than the standard stuff you’d find at Brooks Brothers or J. Press. They also have a fully sized, unlined collar that gives the kind of wrinkly, carefree roll that enthusiasts find so charming. The only problem is that Mercer & Sons’ shirts fit very, very full, so you if you use them, you may have to turn to their made-to-order service. That’s where you can size the body down two and taper it further by two or four inches. To find out if this might work for you, email Mercer and ask for their shirt measurements.
The other exceptional option is O’Connell’s, who has one of the best button down collars I’ve seen. Ethan there tells me that they’re also working on a new model based on mid-century Brooks Brothers designs. That should be released sometime by the end of this year, and we’ll be certain to announce it when it does.
For something slim fitting, I really like Kamakura. They make two fits – a regular cut and a slim fit. I suspect the slim fit is just the regular cut, but with darts in the back. Admittedly, darts look a bit strange to me on an OCBD, but the body of the shirt still fits fairly well, so long as you have a slim stomach. Either way, both the regular and slim fits have great looking collars. See it worn here at Ivy Style.
You may also want to consider Brooks Brothers’ slim and extra-slim fits once they go on sale. I like Kamakura’s shirts better, but on the downside, they never go on sale. Brooks Brothers’ oxfords, on the other hand, regularly get discounted to about $50 a pop.
Conversely, if money is no object, you can check out Harry Stedman, who makes a pretty nice design from a hodgepodge of classic American details. Just note that they fit pretty slim, so if you’re a regular 36, you may want to opt for a 38 or simply a size small.  
If you want something dressy, try Ledbury. Theirs isn’t a conventional OCBD like the others we’ve covered here. The fabric is a smoother Thomas Mason cloth that’s somewhat reminiscent of Royal Oxford, and the shirt doesn’t have details such as box pleats or chest pockets. All in all, it’s just a dressier looking shirt, which can be good depending on what you’re going for. 
For something affordable, I like Land’s End’s tailored fit oxfords. Their fabric feels better than what Uniqlo and Lands’ End Canvas offers, and the fit isn’t as trendy. Though, depending on your style, Uniqlo and Lands’ End Canvas’ slimmer fits and shorter collars might work better for you. Either way, be sure to wait for sales. Lands’ End oxfords can be had for about $30 or $35, while Uniqlo and Lands’ End Canvas will often be sold for about $20.
Finally, if you want to get something custom made, I can recommend Cottonwork and Ascot Chang from personal experience. Cottonwork, as I’ve noted, does online made to measure, while Ascot Chang does full bespoke. The second tends to have an advantage in terms of executing an ideal fit, but the first will be considerably more affordable. Both do good work, however. You may also want to look into other custom shirtmakers, such as CEGO, Geneva, Anto, Dege & Skinner, and many others. Check StyleForum for recommendations, and perhaps acquaint yourself with the process of buying custom shirts through these posts I wrote last year. 

The OCBD Shirt Series, Part VI: Our Recommendations

After reviewing so many companies, we thought it’d be useful to say which we recommend the most. Obviously much depends on your taste, build, and budget. The great thing about having such a varied market, however, is that there’s almost something for everyone. 

If you want something traditional, I recommend either Mercer & Sons or O’Connell’s. Mercer & Sons has a great oxford cloth that’s a bit more variegated in color and nubby in texture than the standard stuff you’d find at Brooks Brothers or J. Press. They also have a fully sized, unlined collar that gives the kind of wrinkly, carefree roll that enthusiasts find so charming. The only problem is that Mercer & Sons’ shirts fit very, very full, so you if you use them, you may have to turn to their made-to-order service. That’s where you can size the body down two and taper it further by two or four inches. To find out if this might work for you, email Mercer and ask for their shirt measurements.

The other exceptional option is O’Connell’s, who has one of the best button down collars I’ve seen. Ethan there tells me that they’re also working on a new model based on mid-century Brooks Brothers designs. That should be released sometime by the end of this year, and we’ll be certain to announce it when it does.

For something slim fitting, I really like Kamakura. They make two fits – a regular cut and a slim fit. I suspect the slim fit is just the regular cut, but with darts in the back. Admittedly, darts look a bit strange to me on an OCBD, but the body of the shirt still fits fairly well, so long as you have a slim stomach. Either way, both the regular and slim fits have great looking collars. See it worn here at Ivy Style.

You may also want to consider Brooks Brothers’ slim and extra-slim fits once they go on sale. I like Kamakura’s shirts better, but on the downside, they never go on sale. Brooks Brothers’ oxfords, on the other hand, regularly get discounted to about $50 a pop.

Conversely, if money is no object, you can check out Harry Stedman, who makes a pretty nice design from a hodgepodge of classic American details. Just note that they fit pretty slim, so if you’re a regular 36, you may want to opt for a 38 or simply a size small.  

If you want something dressy, try Ledbury. Theirs isn’t a conventional OCBD like the others we’ve covered here. The fabric is a smoother Thomas Mason cloth that’s somewhat reminiscent of Royal Oxford, and the shirt doesn’t have details such as box pleats or chest pockets. All in all, it’s just a dressier looking shirt, which can be good depending on what you’re going for. 

For something affordable, I like Land’s End’s tailored fit oxfords. Their fabric feels better than what Uniqlo and Lands’ End Canvas offers, and the fit isn’t as trendy. Though, depending on your style, Uniqlo and Lands’ End Canvas’ slimmer fits and shorter collars might work better for you. Either way, be sure to wait for sales. Lands’ End oxfords can be had for about $30 or $35, while Uniqlo and Lands’ End Canvas will often be sold for about $20.

Finally, if you want to get something custom made, I can recommend Cottonwork and Ascot Chang from personal experience. Cottonwork, as I’ve noted, does online made to measure, while Ascot Chang does full bespoke. The second tends to have an advantage in terms of executing an ideal fit, but the first will be considerably more affordable. Both do good work, however. You may also want to look into other custom shirtmakers, such as CEGO, Geneva, Anto, Dege & Skinner, and many others. Check StyleForum for recommendations, and perhaps acquaint yourself with the process of buying custom shirts through these posts I wrote last year

The OCBD Shirt Series, Part IV: The Reviews

We continue today with four more reviews of oxford cloth button downs. Again, basic features and measurements are given, so you can more objectively compare these shirts against each other. You can check part III of this series for our first set of reviews. 

Lands’ End Tailored Fit Hyde Park Oxford

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Size: 15 x 32

Retail price: $49

Features: Curved chest pocket; split yoke; seven-button front; box pleat at the back with a locker loop; collar made with a lightweight floating interlining

Measurements: Chest 20.75”; Waist 19”; Shoulders 18.25”; Length 32”; Collar tip 6.75cm

Impressions: Lands’ End’s clothes are often described on the menswear blogosphere as very full fitting and needing a lot of alterations. That hasn’t been my experience. At least for their “tailored fits,” I’ve found that their shirts and pants fit pretty slim. They’re not as slim as fashion-forward brands, but when you compare them to classic silhouettes, they’re decidedly slim nonetheless. 

Their tailored fit oxfords are no different. The body measurements compare well to yesterday’s slim fitting Kamakura, but here the armholes are a bit bigger. The collar tips are also shorter – too short to produce any roll, unfortunately, even when the collar is worn without a necktie. Additionally, while the oxford cloth they use is quite soft, it’s a bit flat and boring in its color, and less nubby in texture. If Lands’ End produced something with a more traditionally sized collar and used a fabric with more contrasting weft and warp yarns (to produce a bit more visual depth), I’d be a bigger fan. Still, $49 isn’t bad as a price, and aside from the bigger armholes, the body itself fits pretty well. Something to consider if you’re on a budget and don’t plan to wear this with a tie.

Ledbury’s Classic Fit Blue Oxford

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Size: 15

Retail price: $125

Features: No chest pocket; seven-button front; slightly lowered second button on the placket; side pleats on the back; off-centered button on the sleeve cuff; collar made with a lightweight fused interlining

Measurements: Chest 21”; Waist 20.25”; Shoulders 18”; Length 31.5”; Collar tip 7.5cm

Impressions: Our advertiser Ledbury also makes an OCBD, but theirs is a much different animal than the others we’re reviewing. To start, they’re using an oxford cloth from Thomas Mason. It has a very slight, almost imperceptible sheen, and feels much dressier than other oxfords. It somewhat reminds me of Royal Oxford, which is an oxford cloth you commonly see in Italy, but Ledbury’s is more subdued. Their design also doesn’t have a chest pocket at the front or box pleat at the back. All in all, it just feels like a much dressier oxford cloth button down. If you want something dressier and a touch more modern, Ledbury would be a good option. The one they sent me is in the classic fit, but they have a slimmer fitting version as well.

Harry Stedman

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Size: Blue sized small; green sized 36

Retail price: £100-£124 for non-EU customers (~$150-189)

Features: On the blue, there’s a six-button front; box pleat and locker loop at the back; button at the back of the collar; no sleeve gauntlet buttons, and no chest pocket. On the green, there’s a seven-button front; box pleat with no locker loop at the back; button at the back of the collar; a flapped chest pocket at the front; and no sleeve gauntlet buttons.

Measurements: On the blue: Chest 20.25”; Waist 18.25”; Shoulders 17.5”; Length 30”; Collar tip 7.5cm. On the green: Chest 20”; Waist 18.25”; Shoulders 16.5”; Length 30”; Collar tip 7.5cm

Impressions: UK-based Harry Stedman sent me two of their oxfords to review. The green oxford is sized by chest, and fits slimmer than the alpha sized blue oxford. Both fit very slim, however.

Each shirt has a hodgepodge of classic American details – flapped chest pockets (J. Press), locker loops (Gant), and yes, even a fully unlined collars (Brooks Brothers). I favor unlined collars – as they can be more carefree and comfortable – but Harry Stedman’s is perhaps a bit too short to take advantage of their construction. Unlike Mercer & Son’s, who has a much fuller collar, Harry Stedman’s collar leafs measure 7.5cm. It’s enough to produce a bit of a roll, but is still perhaps best worn without a tie.

I do wish these had more traditional proportions and came sized by collar and sleeve, but if you want a more fashion forward shirt, and have the money to spend, Harry Stedman’s would be something to consider.

Uniqlo’s Slim Fit Long Sleeved Oxford

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Size: Small

Retail price: $30

Features: Curved chest pocket; seven-button front; collar constructed with a lightweight floating interlining

Measurements: Chest 20.25”; Waist 18.25”; Shoulders 17”; Length 29”; Collar tip 6.5cm

Impressions: Uniqlo’s OCBD has the hallmarks of fast fashion. The fabric isn’t that great, the stitching is a bit rough, and the silhouette is very trendy. The shirt hugs close to the body (so much so that it feels like second skin) and it’s too short to properly tuck. The collar is also the shortest we’ve come across, so when you button it down, you get something closer to this instead of this.

Still, it’s $30, and currently on sale for $20. If you’re a student, on a tight budget, and are around people who wear trendier clothes, this could be the right buy for the time being. The shirt is difficult to tuck in and the collar is too skimpy to wear with a tie, but you may be unlikely to do either anyway. If these seem right or you, consider Lands’ End Canvas. A few years ago, those used to be discounted to ~$17 on clearance, which is about how much I think they’re worth, but I’m unsure if that’s still the case. 

On Monday, we’ll review our last set of shirts, which of course will include Brooks Brothers’ contemporary line.

It’s On Sale: Lands’ End dress trousers

It’s still a chilly spring for many of us, but it’ll soon be sweltering summer and wearing wool trousers will perhaps be slightly unpleasant. Instead, consider picking up a few pairs of odd trousers made in linen or linen-cotton blends to keep your legs cool and still looking dressed up. 

I’m a fan of Lands’ End’s trousers as an inexpensive option for the workhorse dress trouser in their tailored fit. They’re not overly slim and you’ll likely want to take them to a tailor for alterations, but on a budget they’re a good deal, especially on sale. 

Currently, Lands’ End has 25% off all dress shirts, suits, trousers and ties. The trousers above are $59.25, down from $79.

Plus, you can get free shipping with code SPARKLE and PIN 4305 on orders over $50.* 

I have three pairs I bought last year and wore them quite a bit. The fabric was great on the linen-cotton pairs, which seem to hold up against wrinkles a bit better than regular linen — but are still cool enough to wear in the heat. I would offer the suggestion, however, of sizing down perhaps 1”-2” in the waist, as they seemed a bit vanity sized if my memory is correct from last summer. 

-Kiyoshi

*Note: This post has been corrected. Originally, I thought there was an additional 25% off the sale price with the code. The 25% is already applied and the code is for free shipping. Apologies for the confusion. I still think the trousers are a great deal.

Unsolicited Endorsement: Lands’ End Crew Socks
When I’m wearing sneakers, I prefer not to wear white socks. Sure, I’ll wear Costco Champion athletic socks for actual athletics (even I exercise sometimes), but when I’m wearing jeans, I prefer something with some color. I haven’t found a better ratio of price to quality in that department than Lands’ End.
Lands’ End crew socks are thick enough to feel right with my trainers. They’re reasonably priced ($13.30 for two pair, currently). They come in a bunch of colors (I favor burgundy, navy and red). They’re mostly cotton, with enough synthetic to help them hold their color, shape and comfort after many washes. They’re just a solid performer. I’ve got a few pairs of similar socks from Uniqlo, and the Lands’ End model puts them to shame.
So: consider the Lands’ End cotton crew sock ENDORSED.

Unsolicited Endorsement: Lands’ End Crew Socks

When I’m wearing sneakers, I prefer not to wear white socks. Sure, I’ll wear Costco Champion athletic socks for actual athletics (even I exercise sometimes), but when I’m wearing jeans, I prefer something with some color. I haven’t found a better ratio of price to quality in that department than Lands’ End.

Lands’ End crew socks are thick enough to feel right with my trainers. They’re reasonably priced ($13.30 for two pair, currently). They come in a bunch of colors (I favor burgundy, navy and red). They’re mostly cotton, with enough synthetic to help them hold their color, shape and comfort after many washes. They’re just a solid performer. I’ve got a few pairs of similar socks from Uniqlo, and the Lands’ End model puts them to shame.

So: consider the Lands’ End cotton crew sock ENDORSED.

It’s On Sale: Lands’ End

If you’re looking for affordable basics, then it’s always best to wait until Lands’ End has their sales. Their current Friends & Family promotion knocks 30% off with code BUDDY and PIN 3026

A few deals on basic items worth noting: 

I actually own all of those items in some form with the exception of the OCBDs (personally, more a fan of Brooks Brothers, but Jesse likes Lands’ End) and I think for the sale price they’re a decent value. 

Sale ends Tuesday, February 26. 

-Kiyoshi

It’s on Sale: Best of Black Friday Deals on Wardrobe Basics

Our list of Thanksgiving holiday sales and discount codes continues to grow and be updated. Black Friday deals are hard to judge if they’re the best best price you’ll see on an item, however, it’s usually a good time to purchase items that fall under the umbrella of wardrobe basics that don’t go on end-of-season clearance. 

The 30% off sale at Lands’ End produces several great deals, especially if you stack it with their clearance section, but it’s a good time to get a deal on basics, too. Their Hyde Park OCBDs come to $34.30 — just use code WONDERLAND with PIN 2126

3sixteen has their raw selvedge denim on sale. Offering 10% off might not seem like a huge deal, but it’s rare they ever discount their jeans — in fact, they often sell out and the price keeps going up for a pair at retail ever year. I’m a huge fan of their SL-100x and Derek’s also praised his pair as well, too. Price comes to $198 with code BF2012 and sale ends tonight.

And if you need a cheaper pair of jeans, Levi’s 501s are 40% off with code BLKFRI, bringing their dark-rinse pair to $46.80. 

If you live in a place that snows and don’t have winter boots yet, then I’d recommend picking up a pair of L.L.Bean Boots, which are on sale for $89.10 with code THANKS10, which knocks 10% off and you get free shipping. They’ve lasted me through two Chicago winters and will probably last many more. 

If you need neckwear, The Knottery’s 25% off (code: GOBBLE) sale gives you silk knit ties for $18.75 and silk grenadines for $41.25 — both are an incredible deal. Derek’s reviewed both previously. 

If you’re looking for affordable chinos, Ralph Lauren’s “Preston” chinos are on sale for $44.99 and come with free shipping. Four colors and a whole bunch of sizes still in stock. 

Finally, if you’ve been thinking of getting a Barbour waxed cotton jacket, check out End Clothing’s selection. They’re offering 25% off your entire order and they deduct VAT for U.S. customers. That brings a jacket like the Ashby to $198.75. 

We Got It For Free: Everlane Oxford Shirt Review
Lots of readers have been asking me about Everlane, a web-based clothing company with a very specific promise: that because they cut out the middle man, they can offer premium clothing at a modest price. The brand releases one product at a time, and focus on basics. Which makes a lot of sense, particularly from a marketing point of view - they make each product release an event, in the hopes people will share them. I was curious, but not quite curious enough to buy something. Luckily, the other day Everlane offered a sample of their new oxford shirt, so I jumped at the chance.
Here’s what I found: it’s a shirt that’s a reasonable buy at its price point, $55. If Everlane is promising more than that, this shirt won’t live up to its promise.
The Everlane oxford is a very casual shirt. It has a small-ish collar that’s very soft - I wouldn’t wear it with a tie. The tails are very short, clearly designed to be worn outside the trousers. The fabric is very lightweight for an oxford buttondown. The fit is quite slim - a size large fit me well around the middle, but was a little tight on my 42” chest, which is unusually thin. Unfortunately, since the shirts have S-M-L-XL sizing, the sleeves were just a tad short for me, and the collar just a tad big. I’d say the large is a 16 1/2 x 35 or so, but with a chest sized for a man who wears a 40 coat.
One of the great values of an oxford buttowndown is its versatility. I wear mine with sportcoats, with a sweater, with jeans, with flannels, with almost everything besides a suit, nine months out of the year. Everlane’s offering is a decent weekend shirt, worn untucked with jeans, if it fits you. Unfortunately, the lack of neck and sleeve sizing makes it much more difficult to find the right fit, which is particularly important if you want or need to wear a tie.
Everlane’s quality promise is that they can make clothes that would be twice as expensive without their direct-to-consumer model. I don’t think I buy that. I’d say these shirts are comparable to Lands’ End Canvas, which are $5 less at retail (and often on sale - right now you could buy one for $21). They’re also pretty similar to Uniqlo’s offering, which is $29.90 at full price, and also regularly goes on sale.
If I want a sized shirt, so I can confidently wear it with a coat and tie (or just be confident that it will fit my neck and arms), I can go to Brooks Brothers, where oxfords retail for $80, but are frequently three for $200 or even less. Or I can go to Lands’ End, where for $49 I can get their excellent quality Hyde Park tailored-fit shirt for $49 (before sales).
So: if you’re long and thin, particularly in the chest, and are looking for a casual shirt, Everlane’s offering is worth the price. But don’t expect a miracle.

We Got It For Free: Everlane Oxford Shirt Review

Lots of readers have been asking me about Everlane, a web-based clothing company with a very specific promise: that because they cut out the middle man, they can offer premium clothing at a modest price. The brand releases one product at a time, and focus on basics. Which makes a lot of sense, particularly from a marketing point of view - they make each product release an event, in the hopes people will share them. I was curious, but not quite curious enough to buy something. Luckily, the other day Everlane offered a sample of their new oxford shirt, so I jumped at the chance.

Here’s what I found: it’s a shirt that’s a reasonable buy at its price point, $55. If Everlane is promising more than that, this shirt won’t live up to its promise.

The Everlane oxford is a very casual shirt. It has a small-ish collar that’s very soft - I wouldn’t wear it with a tie. The tails are very short, clearly designed to be worn outside the trousers. The fabric is very lightweight for an oxford buttondown. The fit is quite slim - a size large fit me well around the middle, but was a little tight on my 42” chest, which is unusually thin. Unfortunately, since the shirts have S-M-L-XL sizing, the sleeves were just a tad short for me, and the collar just a tad big. I’d say the large is a 16 1/2 x 35 or so, but with a chest sized for a man who wears a 40 coat.

One of the great values of an oxford buttowndown is its versatility. I wear mine with sportcoats, with a sweater, with jeans, with flannels, with almost everything besides a suit, nine months out of the year. Everlane’s offering is a decent weekend shirt, worn untucked with jeans, if it fits you. Unfortunately, the lack of neck and sleeve sizing makes it much more difficult to find the right fit, which is particularly important if you want or need to wear a tie.

Everlane’s quality promise is that they can make clothes that would be twice as expensive without their direct-to-consumer model. I don’t think I buy that. I’d say these shirts are comparable to Lands’ End Canvas, which are $5 less at retail (and often on sale - right now you could buy one for $21). They’re also pretty similar to Uniqlo’s offering, which is $29.90 at full price, and also regularly goes on sale.

If I want a sized shirt, so I can confidently wear it with a coat and tie (or just be confident that it will fit my neck and arms), I can go to Brooks Brothers, where oxfords retail for $80, but are frequently three for $200 or even less. Or I can go to Lands’ End, where for $49 I can get their excellent quality Hyde Park tailored-fit shirt for $49 (before sales).

So: if you’re long and thin, particularly in the chest, and are looking for a casual shirt, Everlane’s offering is worth the price. But don’t expect a miracle.

It’s On Sale: Lands’ End 30% Off
Lands’ End is offering an additional 30% off coupon with free shipping at the moment. The above shirt - which is actually sized as a dress shirt - is about $20 all-in. It’s one of a bajillion things on sale. There’s tons of dirt-cheap linen and madras that you’ll be happy to bring out next spring, flannel trousers for about $40 and much more.
Use the code LOVEFALL and the pin 2101.

It’s On Sale: Lands’ End 30% Off

Lands’ End is offering an additional 30% off coupon with free shipping at the moment. The above shirt - which is actually sized as a dress shirt - is about $20 all-in. It’s one of a bajillion things on sale. There’s tons of dirt-cheap linen and madras that you’ll be happy to bring out next spring, flannel trousers for about $40 and much more.

Use the code LOVEFALL and the pin 2101.