Save on Suede
Ryan Plett from [you_have_broken_the_internet] dropped a recommendation for these reasonably affordable Johnston & Murphy suede derbies, which weigh in at $135 full retail.
If you’re looking to cut corners on shoe spending, this is exactly where you can do it. The suede in casual shoes like these serves the same purpose as corrected-grain leather - it helps cover up imperfections in hides, allowing the shoemaker to save money on cheap leather. Unlike corrected-grain leather, though, it still looks perfectly decent. Maybe not quite as lustrous as fine-quality suede, but plenty good enough.
Similarly, the rubber soles on these casual shoes save the manufacturer money, but they’re also appropriate for the shoe style. Since you’re unlikely to re-sole a rubber-soled buck anyway, the advantages of quality construction, like ease of re-soling, are greatly reduced. These are knock-around shoes, and you should pay knock-around prices.
If you buy a wingtip at full retail and pay $125, you’ll get something that is very obviously of poor quality. The leather will be visibly cheap - shiny and plasticky. The shoe won’t be resolable, and will be unlikely to last. It’s simply not a good decision.
Buy a suede buck for $125, and it’s a different story. When it comes to suede casual shoes, $125 buys you a shoe that’s pretty darn close to what you’d get for $300, at least in practical terms. There will be a difference: the construction of the expensive shoe will be better, the materials better, the styling perhaps more elegant, but the performance gap is much, much smaller than with a dress shoe. And when you consider that shoes by mid-range companies like Cole Haan and Johnston & Murphy can often be found on deep discount, there’s no reason you have to spend more than $75 or $80 for a pair of bucks or suede saddles.

Save on Suede

Ryan Plett from [you_have_broken_the_internet] dropped a recommendation for these reasonably affordable Johnston & Murphy suede derbies, which weigh in at $135 full retail.

If you’re looking to cut corners on shoe spending, this is exactly where you can do it. The suede in casual shoes like these serves the same purpose as corrected-grain leather - it helps cover up imperfections in hides, allowing the shoemaker to save money on cheap leather. Unlike corrected-grain leather, though, it still looks perfectly decent. Maybe not quite as lustrous as fine-quality suede, but plenty good enough.

Similarly, the rubber soles on these casual shoes save the manufacturer money, but they’re also appropriate for the shoe style. Since you’re unlikely to re-sole a rubber-soled buck anyway, the advantages of quality construction, like ease of re-soling, are greatly reduced. These are knock-around shoes, and you should pay knock-around prices.

If you buy a wingtip at full retail and pay $125, you’ll get something that is very obviously of poor quality. The leather will be visibly cheap - shiny and plasticky. The shoe won’t be resolable, and will be unlikely to last. It’s simply not a good decision.

Buy a suede buck for $125, and it’s a different story. When it comes to suede casual shoes, $125 buys you a shoe that’s pretty darn close to what you’d get for $300, at least in practical terms. There will be a difference: the construction of the expensive shoe will be better, the materials better, the styling perhaps more elegant, but the performance gap is much, much smaller than with a dress shoe. And when you consider that shoes by mid-range companies like Cole Haan and Johnston & Murphy can often be found on deep discount, there’s no reason you have to spend more than $75 or $80 for a pair of bucks or suede saddles.

How Leathers are Made

A good friend, GW, sent me this wonderful video about shell cordovan. The film reminded me of another video I’ve seen about how calf leather is made. Both are worth a watch. 

As a note, if you’ve never handled shell cordovan shoes before, your priority for the next week should be to get your hands on some immediately. Reading about shell cordovan on the internet is no substitute. There is a reason why so many menswear enthusiasts go crazy over the stuff. 

Major P.J. Pretorius
Sept. 5, 1919
Kenklebosch, South Africa
Technical clothing has come a long way since Major Pretorius’ day.
(thanks, Mike)

Major P.J. Pretorius

Sept. 5, 1919

Kenklebosch, South Africa

Technical clothing has come a long way since Major Pretorius’ day.

(thanks, Mike)

When we first checked in with the blog Fleshfoot, the proprietor had purchased a brand-new pair of natural tan boots, with the intention of wearing them every day for a year and reporting back as they wore in. Above: the original shot of the brand new boots, and a second one from eleven months later. The transformation is remarkable.

An anonymous emailer brought these lovely longwings to my attention. They’re from a new venture by Florsheim called Florsheim Limited; the model is the Veblen. They’re Goodyear welted and unlike Florsheim’s regular longwings, they’re made with full-grain leather, not corrected grain. The particularly nice bit is that they’re only $160. They’re made in India, so don’t expect the world’s finest craftsmen to be working on these, but on paper they look like a superb value. They’re available from Endless and Zappos among other places, so you should be able to find a coupon to bring the price down even further.  Well done, Florsheim!

An anonymous emailer brought these lovely longwings to my attention. They’re from a new venture by Florsheim called Florsheim Limited; the model is the Veblen. They’re Goodyear welted and unlike Florsheim’s regular longwings, they’re made with full-grain leather, not corrected grain. The particularly nice bit is that they’re only $160. They’re made in India, so don’t expect the world’s finest craftsmen to be working on these, but on paper they look like a superb value. They’re available from Endless and Zappos among other places, so you should be able to find a coupon to bring the price down even further.  Well done, Florsheim!

Q and Answer: How to Care for a Leather Bag
An anonymous emailer asks: I’ve got a leather shoulder bag that I use a lot. how should I be  maintaining it? Does it need to be polished, too?
Generally speaking you won’t need to polish a bag - shiny isn’t the adjective you usually want attached to your luggage. 
For the most part, care for a leather bag is simple.  Once a year or so, clean it with some saddle soap.  If you feel like it, or it seems to be drying, rub it down with a bit of leather conditioner.  Be aware that this will likely darken the leather at least a little, but it’ll be in a nice way.  Enjoy it.
If your bag scuffs, a bit of polish can help cover it, just remember that there’s no need to buff.  If your bag gets damaged, a shoe repairman (who does purse repair) is the man to see.

Q and Answer: How to Care for a Leather Bag

An anonymous emailer asks: I’ve got a leather shoulder bag that I use a lot. how should I be maintaining it? Does it need to be polished, too?

Generally speaking you won’t need to polish a bag - shiny isn’t the adjective you usually want attached to your luggage. 

For the most part, care for a leather bag is simple.  Once a year or so, clean it with some saddle soap.  If you feel like it, or it seems to be drying, rub it down with a bit of leather conditioner.  Be aware that this will likely darken the leather at least a little, but it’ll be in a nice way.  Enjoy it.

If your bag scuffs, a bit of polish can help cover it, just remember that there’s no need to buff.  If your bag gets damaged, a shoe repairman (who does purse repair) is the man to see.

I learned many life lessons from growing up in the inner city.
One of the most significant: there is no sadder garment than the patchwork leather jacket.

I learned many life lessons from growing up in the inner city.

One of the most significant: there is no sadder garment than the patchwork leather jacket.

Leather: A Cautionary Tale
I’ve been thinking about shoes, as we prepare to shoot the first episode of season one, which is about caring for your footwear.  Judging by your questions, there are lots of PTO readers who want some basic information about choosing quality shoes.  Today, let’s talk a bit about leather.
First of all: don’t buy dress shoes that aren’t made of leather. Perhaps that’s obvious, but I will say it anyway, just in case.  I understand that some folks are vegetarian or vegan, and don’t wear leather, and I respect that completely.  All I can suggest to those people is maybe to consider whether their ethics will accommodate used leather shoes.  Men’s dress shoes are made of leather because leather is a fantastic material to make shoes from, and plastic is not.
That said, just because you’ve bought some leather shoes doesn’t mean you’re getting the good stuff.
If you walk into the men’s shoe section of JC Penney’s today, you’ll generally find shoes made of leather.  But not the good stuff.  Like the Kenneth Cole shoes pictured above, they’re made of what’s called “corrected grain" or sometimes "polished" leather.
What is corrected grain leather?  Well, most animal hides are imperfect.  They have marks, scars, imperfections that make them unsuitable for use in shoes.  You wouldn’t, after all, buy a shoe with a big scar on it.  There are plenty of applications for leather which don’t require a perfect surface, but shoes do.  So rather than use only the best portions of the hide for shoemaking, manufacturers literally sand off the surface of the hide.  Then they build a new, chemical surface on top.
The result looks like the (hideous) Kenneth Coles pictured above.  It’s leather, but the finish is, for lack of a better adjective, plastic-y.  It has an unnatural shine, and there is either no grain or, sometimes, an embossed grain.  Like when people make fake alligator handbags.
This works out fine for the cheap manufacturer, as the shoe looks good in the store to a consumer who’s just looking for “shiny leather,” but the disadvantages are numerous.  Besides the tacky finish, corrected grain creases more severely (because of the added layer of plastic-y chemicals on top of the leather), breathes more poorly, and ages badly, as the finish can be damaged or can even flake off of the leather below.  If you go to a thrift store, you’ll find many cheap Bostonian dress shoes with a finish that’s literally peeling off the shoe.  So, in short, avoid corrected grain.
Instead, look for shoes made of full-grain leather.  Spend some time looking at a quality shoe in a nice department store - say an Alden shoe in Nordstrom.  Notice that the surface feels like leather, not like enamel.  Notice the depth of the color.  It’s not too tough to tell the difference between full grain and corrected grain if you get a little practice under your belt.  Generally quality manufacturers are (justifiably) proud of the materials they use - a good shoe salesperson will be familiar with the difference.  Language like “full-grain calf” is what you’re looking for, and “polished calf” is what you’re trying to avoid.  A well-made pair of full-grain leather shoes will last through half a dozen resolings and twenty years of wear.
There’s one more type of shoe leather you should be aware of: shell cordovan. Unlike most shoe leather, made from cow hides, shell cordovan is made from horse hides.  Specifically from the thickest part of the horse hide, the rump.  Shell cordovan shoes are expensive, because relatively few horse hides are processed for shoe leather, but they have several advantages over calf.  Shell cordovan is relatively thick and extremely durable.  It’s more weather-resistant than calf.  It also doesn’t crease in the way calf does.  The stress points in shell cordovan shoes don’t look like a little network of rivers, but rather like a few rolling hills.  Of course, the scarcity and quality of shell means that new shell cordovan shoes tend to sell for upwards of $500.
Because shell cordovan shoes last so well, they’re possible to find used.  Manufacturers like Florsheim, Nettleton and Alden used them for traditional shoes for many years.  You’d do well to look at some pictures of worn shell cordovan shoes so you can recognize the material should you run across it in a thrift store.
Leather is the essential building block of every shoe.    If you want footwear that can live with you for the next twenty years, get the good stuff.

Leather: A Cautionary Tale

I’ve been thinking about shoes, as we prepare to shoot the first episode of season one, which is about caring for your footwear.  Judging by your questions, there are lots of PTO readers who want some basic information about choosing quality shoes.  Today, let’s talk a bit about leather.

First of all: don’t buy dress shoes that aren’t made of leather. Perhaps that’s obvious, but I will say it anyway, just in case.  I understand that some folks are vegetarian or vegan, and don’t wear leather, and I respect that completely.  All I can suggest to those people is maybe to consider whether their ethics will accommodate used leather shoes.  Men’s dress shoes are made of leather because leather is a fantastic material to make shoes from, and plastic is not.

That said, just because you’ve bought some leather shoes doesn’t mean you’re getting the good stuff.

If you walk into the men’s shoe section of JC Penney’s today, you’ll generally find shoes made of leather.  But not the good stuff.  Like the Kenneth Cole shoes pictured above, they’re made of what’s called “corrected grain" or sometimes "polished" leather.

What is corrected grain leather?  Well, most animal hides are imperfect.  They have marks, scars, imperfections that make them unsuitable for use in shoes.  You wouldn’t, after all, buy a shoe with a big scar on it.  There are plenty of applications for leather which don’t require a perfect surface, but shoes do.  So rather than use only the best portions of the hide for shoemaking, manufacturers literally sand off the surface of the hide.  Then they build a new, chemical surface on top.

The result looks like the (hideous) Kenneth Coles pictured above.  It’s leather, but the finish is, for lack of a better adjective, plastic-y.  It has an unnatural shine, and there is either no grain or, sometimes, an embossed grain.  Like when people make fake alligator handbags.

This works out fine for the cheap manufacturer, as the shoe looks good in the store to a consumer who’s just looking for “shiny leather,” but the disadvantages are numerous.  Besides the tacky finish, corrected grain creases more severely (because of the added layer of plastic-y chemicals on top of the leather), breathes more poorly, and ages badly, as the finish can be damaged or can even flake off of the leather below.  If you go to a thrift store, you’ll find many cheap Bostonian dress shoes with a finish that’s literally peeling off the shoe.  So, in short, avoid corrected grain.

Instead, look for shoes made of full-grain leather.  Spend some time looking at a quality shoe in a nice department store - say an Alden shoe in Nordstrom.  Notice that the surface feels like leather, not like enamel.  Notice the depth of the color.  It’s not too tough to tell the difference between full grain and corrected grain if you get a little practice under your belt.  Generally quality manufacturers are (justifiably) proud of the materials they use - a good shoe salesperson will be familiar with the difference.  Language like “full-grain calf” is what you’re looking for, and “polished calf” is what you’re trying to avoid.  A well-made pair of full-grain leather shoes will last through half a dozen resolings and twenty years of wear.

There’s one more type of shoe leather you should be aware of: shell cordovan. Unlike most shoe leather, made from cow hides, shell cordovan is made from horse hides.  Specifically from the thickest part of the horse hide, the rump.  Shell cordovan shoes are expensive, because relatively few horse hides are processed for shoe leather, but they have several advantages over calf.  Shell cordovan is relatively thick and extremely durable.  It’s more weather-resistant than calf.  It also doesn’t crease in the way calf does.  The stress points in shell cordovan shoes don’t look like a little network of rivers, but rather like a few rolling hills.  Of course, the scarcity and quality of shell means that new shell cordovan shoes tend to sell for upwards of $500.

Because shell cordovan shoes last so well, they’re possible to find used.  Manufacturers like Florsheim, Nettleton and Alden used them for traditional shoes for many years.  You’d do well to look at some pictures of worn shell cordovan shoes so you can recognize the material should you run across it in a thrift store.

Leather is the essential building block of every shoe.    If you want footwear that can live with you for the next twenty years, get the good stuff.

All I Want For Christmas: John Roderick

Today in our continuing series of style requests from men we like, John Roderick.  Roderick’s the frontman of the Seattle band The Long Winters, and his strapping, flannely, missing-toothed style makes him a darling of lumberjack fetishists everywhere.  In addition to his music, Roderick is the author of “electric aphorisms,” a book of short-form wit.

These custom-made boots are the ultimate, maximum piece of super-excellent boss gear, ever.  If I owned these boots I would just roam the back highways of America on my Triumph, dispensing a kind of rough justice as I searched for a way to forget my past. If I owned these boots I would probably be real quiet and hard to figure out, and waitresses would be intrigued by my solitary nature.  These boots are very expensive, but it wouldn’t matter because my only other clothes would be some dusty denim and a weather-beaten horsehide jacket.”

Eighteen Inch Wesco Boss Engineer Boot

Ultimatum by The Long Winters