“Keith and I would sell and fit all at the same time. We had an ashtray into which we would scrape our chalk dust when we sharpened them. We could have made a fortune. So many of these guys, who were so used to seeing cocaine in piles, thought it was cocaine and wanted to buy a line!! The other comment we received was that we should hide it from the hotel staff as they would probably steal it. To them, this was clearly a common sight. It was crazy, it was fun and it was quite lucrative.” — Bespoke tailor Leonard Logsdail, on his experience fitting Wall Street guys in the 1980s. 

Put This On Season Two, Episode 2: Eclecticism

Put This On, a web series about dressing like a grownup, visits New York City, where eclectic style is a way of life.

We go thrifting with Josh and Trav from the blog Street Etiquette. They’re known for their thrift-store eyes and their unique editorials. We drop some shopping and alteration knowledge and have a friendly competition: who can pick up the coolest stuff in three shops and two hours?

Visit Jay Kos, the eclectic boutique that fuses traditional style with a decidedly non-traditional palette. It’s a favorite of modern dandies because of Jay’s bold color sense and wild material choices. Here you can find traditionally-made trousers in green python or a fine Italian sportcoat rendered in a blown-up flannel shirting pattern.

Meet Lewis Lapham, the found of Lapham’s Quarterly and longtime editor of Harper’s Magazine. Lapham discusses why fine clothes suit the humble journalist, and compares a coat and tie to the pair of gold coins Flaubert carried in his pocket - they lend the bearer a sense of weight.

In our How It’s Made segment, we learn what’s inside your jacket. Tailor Leonard Logsdail tears open a few coats to show us their guts and compares the construction of pieces at a variety of price points.

Plus, the return of Rudiments with new host Dave Hill. Dave explains that a coat isn’t finished until it has been altered by a tailor.

This is the second episode in our six-episode second season. In this season, we visit the three greatest men’s style cities in the world, as chosen by our readers - New York, Milan and London.

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Watch it elsewhere:

Vimeo / Youtube / iTunes


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Buy Season One on DVD for $16

This episode was supported by our viewers and by The Put This On Gentlemen’s Association.


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Executive Producers: Jesse Thorn & Adam Lisagor

Director: Benjamin Ahr Harrison

Host / Writer / Producer: Jesse Thorn

Rudiments: Dave Hill

Producer: Andrew Yamato

Director of Photography: Ryan Samul

Sound: Andrew J. Reardon

Stephen at The Simply Refined sent me this video he shot with Leonard Logsdail, one of the finest tailors in the United States. Logsdail has a lot to say about the tailoring process and particularly about how important his relationship with his customers is. Very interesting stuff.

If you want to see a nightly lesson in how a suit should fit, watch The Late Show with David Letterman.
Now - I’m hardly an unbiased observer.  Letterman is, in my book, The Greatest American.  The fact, however, remains, that Letterman’s suits are consistently beautiful. 
When Letterman held down the Late Night slot on NBC, he dressed pretty casually.  He was often seen in a baseball jacket, or an oxford shirt.  He often went no further than a blazer and rep tie.  He was relaxed and his only style was a rejection of the previous late-night-host expectations.
When he moved to CBS, however, he reset his style.  He understood that he was upholding a tradition exemplified by his hero, Johnny Carson, and that a gracious late night host wore a suit.
I don’t know who makes Letterman’s suits, but they are consistently impeccable.  I’m not always crazy about the shiny, high-thread-count wools he chooses (particularly on camera), or the all pinstripes.  They always, however, fit.
Of course, Letterman’s style isn’t perfect.  He invariably wears a white shirt, which does his complexion (and his cameramen) no favors.  He has an annoying habit of leaving his jacket open while standing - even on double-breasted coats - which makes him look slovenly and out-of-shape.  (This couldn’t be further from the truth, by the way - he’s a strapping, athletic guy.)  Worst of all, he insists on wearing loafers with his suits… and (ick) white socks.  That’s charming with chinos in Take Ivy, but untenable on network TV. 
Still… those suits.  Perfect.  Also: Letterman: greatest ever.
BREAKING: Rob informs me that Letterman’s suits are made in New York by Leonard Logsdail.

If you want to see a nightly lesson in how a suit should fit, watch The Late Show with David Letterman.

Now - I’m hardly an unbiased observer.  Letterman is, in my book, The Greatest American.  The fact, however, remains, that Letterman’s suits are consistently beautiful. 

When Letterman held down the Late Night slot on NBC, he dressed pretty casually.  He was often seen in a baseball jacket, or an oxford shirt.  He often went no further than a blazer and rep tie.  He was relaxed and his only style was a rejection of the previous late-night-host expectations.

When he moved to CBS, however, he reset his style.  He understood that he was upholding a tradition exemplified by his hero, Johnny Carson, and that a gracious late night host wore a suit.

I don’t know who makes Letterman’s suits, but they are consistently impeccable.  I’m not always crazy about the shiny, high-thread-count wools he chooses (particularly on camera), or the all pinstripes.  They always, however, fit.

Of course, Letterman’s style isn’t perfect.  He invariably wears a white shirt, which does his complexion (and his cameramen) no favors.  He has an annoying habit of leaving his jacket open while standing - even on double-breasted coats - which makes him look slovenly and out-of-shape.  (This couldn’t be further from the truth, by the way - he’s a strapping, athletic guy.)  Worst of all, he insists on wearing loafers with his suits… and (ick) white socks.  That’s charming with chinos in Take Ivy, but untenable on network TV. 

Still… those suits.  Perfect.  Also: Letterman: greatest ever.

BREAKING: Rob informs me that Letterman’s suits are made in New York by Leonard Logsdail.