A Visit to Walker Slater in Edinburgh, Scotland

While I was in Edinburgh this past week, performing in the Fringe Festival, I took the opportunity to stop by Walker Slater, the town’s premier menswear shop. Endinburgh’s a beautiful, gloomy town, hung with fog even at the height of summer, and Walker Slater is perfectly suited for its environment. Inside are warm woolens, worn leather and plenty of tweed.

The shop began in the 1980s featuring more standard fashion fare, but the owners quickly found that despite Edinburgh’s status as one of the cultural capitals of Scotland, which itself is the world’s capital of tweed, there wasn’t much decent tweed to be found. They experimented with tweed trousers, sold them quickly, and within a few years they were off to the races, leaving t-shirts behind in favor of breeks and braces.

The shop offers one of the widest selections of tweeds I’ve had the chance to see in a clothing store. There are serious, sedate tweed suits and bold, outrageous ones. Something for every occasion. A handsome and dandyish Kenyan man who worked for the United Nations was placing a made-to-measure order when I stopped in. One sportcoat relatively serious, one with a blinding red overcheck. Both looked like they’d come out looking tremendous.

One of the things that impressed me most about Walker Slater was the price point. These weren’t Chester Barrie-made supersuits, but the quality was solid, and the prices were quite reasonable. I was lusting after a £125 shirt jacket, and sportcoats ran £390. I also had to remind myself that I lived in Los Angeles to help restrain myself from grabbing a whole stack of their lovely moleskin trousers, including some in ivory white.

I had a bit of a chat with the shop manager, and he told me that the owners really prioritize keeping the retail prices reasonable, which I always appreciate. They’re also, of course, selling own-brand merchandise without a middleman. Most trousers and shirts are made in the UK, and most of the tailored clothes are made in a British-owned factory in Portugal.

The shop offers a line of very traditional tweeds, with full-cut trousers and strong shoulders. They also offer a more contemporary style, and both are executed well. I was particularly impressed with their modest collection of casual clothes, which was classic but not at all fusty. Think E. Tautz or Nigel Cabourn. They even have a lovely ladies’ shop a few doors down.

It was a real pleasure, amidst the hubbub of the Fringe, to stumble into this home-grown gem. If you’re in Edinburgh (or London, where they have another outpost), it’s very much worth stopping in.

Walker Slater, 16-20 Victoria St, Edinburgh & 845 Fulham Road, London
(and online at WalkerSlater.com)

(Photos by Jesse Thorn)

Jesse in the UK with Jordan, Jesse, Go!

I’m headed to the UK this week to record episodes of my comedy podcast, Jordan, Jesse, Go! in London and Edinburgh. If you’re in the UK, I hope you’ll come.

Our Edinburgh show is August 22nd at 11PM at the Pleasance Theater. We’ll be joined by our friends Tig Notaro, Graham Clark and Mat Ricardo. Mat’s a variety artist who I met through Put This On, and I’ll probably be wearing jeans, so he will almost certainly outclass me.

In London, we’ve got two shows on the 25th at the Phoenix. We’ll have a whole pile of guests, including Dave Hill, Put This On’s very own Rudiments correspondent, and the great Helen Zaltzman from the wonderful podcast Answer Me This.

So come out, say hi, and marvel at the difference in dress between the folks who see the show announcements here and the ones who heard about it on a podcast.

The smallest shop in London, circa 1900: a shoe salesman with a 1.2 square meter shoeshop.
(via, ht)

The smallest shop in London, circa 1900: a shoe salesman with a 1.2 square meter shoeshop.

(via, ht)

Pardeep from London emailed me about his very cool site, Singh Street Style. It’s on-the-street photos of stylish Sikh men. He says he wanted to help his Sikh compatriots be proud of the way they look, turbans and all. Looks like a great success to me - but I’ve always thought turbans were pretty cool. Whether on Sikh guys or Andre 3000.

(link via Mister Crew)

The Suits of James Bond has a great interview with Oscar Udeshi of the British clothier Udeshi. He talks about how James Bond has inspired his business and his own big rear end, among other things.

The Suits of James Bond has a great interview with Oscar Udeshi of the British clothier Udeshi. He talks about how James Bond has inspired his business and his own big rear end, among other things.

Put This On Season 2 Episode 3 Clothing Credits

Intro & Savile Row

Coat - Vintage by Capper & Capper

Scarf - Courtesy of Christine Cariati

Gloves - Vintage

Hat - Vintage by Royal Stetson

Suit - Vintage by Giacomo Trabalza

Cardigan - Vintage by Brooks Brothers (From S2E2)

Shirt - Thin Red Line

Tie - Ralph Lauren Purple Label

Pocket Square - Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Shoes - Vintage Alden

How It’s Made: Drake’s Necktie

Suit - High Society Tailor (cloth by Molloy & Sons)

Cuff Links - Vintage

Shirt - Thin Red Line

Tie - Vintage Carroll & Co.

Square - Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Season 2 Episode 4 Clothing Credits

Introduction

Overcoat - Vintage by Capper & Capper

Scarf - Courtesy of Christine Cariati

Hat - Courtesy of W. Bill

Q and Answer

Coat - Polo Ralph Lauren

Sweater - Vintage

Tie - Cordings

Shirt - Thin Red Line

Pocket Square - Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Scarf - Courtesy Christine Cariati

Hat - Courtesy W. Bill

Trousers - Pro Tailor, Los Angeles

Shoes - Vintage Florsheim

David Saxby

Suit - High Society Tailor (cloth by Molloy & Sons)

Cuff Links - Vintage

Shirt - Thin Red Line

Tie - Vintage Carroll & Co.

Square - Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Put This On Season Two, Episode 4: Eccentric Style

Put This On, a web series about dressing like a grownup, visits London, where we visit with a few of the distinctive personalities that help make London a special place.

Guy Hills makes tweeds with the colors of the London streets- including reflective stripes for cyclists.

David Saxby went from being a vintage dealer to recreating traditional styles in his own factories with the workers who’d been laid off as clothing manufacture left England.

We visit Cordings, an unusual outdoor clothing store that Eric Clapton felt so strongly about he bought it.

And we learn a few ways to tie a scarf. Plus our sponsor, Mailchimp, and of course Rudiments with Dave Hill.

This is the fourth episode in our six-episode second season. In this season, we visit the three greatest men’s style cities in the world, as chosen by our readers - New York, Milan and London.

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Watch it elsewhere:

Vimeo / Youtube / iTunes


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Buy Season One on DVD for $16

This episode was supported by our viewers and by Mailchimp.


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Executive Producers: Jesse Thorn & Adam Lisagor

Director: Benjamin Ahr Harrison

Host / Writer / Producer: Jesse Thorn

Rudiments: Dave Hill

Producer: Kristian Brodie

Director of Photography: Charlie Cook

Sound: Kristian Brodie