Alternatives to Common Projects

The price of minimalist sneakers has really gone through the roof in the last few years. Common Project’s low top Achilles, for example, used to cost somewhere between $250 and $300, but you’d be lucky nowadays to find them at that price on sale. On the upside, with their growing popularity, more and more companies are coming out with their own designs, which means there’s a lot of options at a wide range of price points.

If you’re considering some minimalist kicks, here are some of the non-CP options, from most to least expensive:

Over $300

APC ($355): APC’s sneakers are nearly just as expensive at full retail, but given their distribution, you can easily find them on sale. Totokaelo Man, for example, has them on discount right now for $249. Similarly designed and priced are Wings + Horns and Svensson.

Buttero ($325): A much more original, but still tasteful, take on minimalism. Depending on what you plan to wear with your sneakers, these could be a better option than your standard sleek or sporty designs.  

Our Legacy ($310): This Swedish brand has a really nice, youthful take on contemporary men’s clothing. This season, they have sporty white low top, which is sold at their online store, French Garment Cleaners, and Totokaelo Man.

Hydrogen-1 ($305): A new San Franciscan label with sneakers that are just as well made as any of their competitors. These white low tops with gum soles look great, and they come in suede

Comme des Garcons ($300): Wait, are these minimalist sneakers or just Adbuster rip offs?

Over $200

National Standard ($270+): A relatively new label that I unfortunately don’t know much about, but they’re sold at reputable and fancy boutiques. Check them out at L’ExceptionIkkon, and The Corner.

Erik Schedin ($238): I’ve unfortunately never handled these, but have always admired their design. The listed price drops down to $238 once you deduct for European taxes.

Twins for Peace ($200): A minimalist sneaker with a cheeky pair of shoelaces. If you don’t like the laces, I imagine you can easily swap them out for something simpler. 

Under $200

Garment Project ($192): A Danish company doing basics such as shirts and sweatshirts. Their sneakers have an inverted “V” at the eyelet tabs and a more exaggerated toe cap. Available at MKI and Wardrobe19.

Nikes ($105+): Granted, Nikes will always have that big swoosh, which goes against the spirit of minimalism, but they have some great designs at relatively affordable prices. Check out the Air Force OnesDunksAir Jordan 1 Mids, and Blazers. You can get these in all white if you go through Nike’s ID program.

Saturdays NYC ($95): A nubuck version of Vans Authentics that’s on sale at Totokaelo Man and Roden Gray. Also available? Authentic suede Authentics.

Kent Wang ($95): One of the most affordably priced options of all.

Adidas ($75+): Many of Adidas’ designs can look reasonably minimal. Consider the Sambas or Stan Smiths. After all - the Stan Smith is what almost everyone above is knocking off.

Alternatives to J. Press’ Shaggy Dogs
Pete’s post yesterday reminded me of how much I also regret not buying those Shaggy Dog sweaters when they were “just” $160. On sale, that price occasionally dropped to $108, but fat chance you’ll see them go that low now. At this point, you can expect a sale price of around $172.50 with J. Press’ usual 25%-off discount, which is north of what they used to sell for at full retail just a few years ago. 
There are some alternatives though. The now defunct Ralph Lauren Rugby line used to make brushed Shetlands, and every once in a while, you’ll see them still floating around eBay for between $50 and $110. The sweater isn’t as thick and densely knitted as J. Press’, but it fits slimmer and has smaller armholes (the second of which I really appreciate). It also has sueded elbow patches, but I imagine those can be carefully removed with a seam ripper if they’re not to your liking. 
Howlin’ of Morrison also has a model towards the end of this page. I really like their Shetlands (this particular piece looks fantastic), but find their brushed version a bit thin (from memory, slightly thinner than even Rugby’s). On the upside, they also fit slimmer than Press’, which might be good for some builds. 
Other options include these pieces by Edifice x Present, Present, William Fox & Sons, Drake’s, John Tulloch, and Neighbour. Of those, I’ve only handled Neighbour’s, which are, again, thinner but potentially better fitting. Some of the prices here aren’t that much cheaper than what J. Press is asking, but it’s nice to have options when sale season comes. I also think there’s a potential for the York Street version to go on deeper discount than J. Press’ mainline stuff, but only time will tell. 
Lastly, MKI also used to carry some last year, but they’ve since sold out. Might be worth keeping an eye on their webstore to see if they’ll restock. 

Alternatives to J. Press’ Shaggy Dogs

Pete’s post yesterday reminded me of how much I also regret not buying those Shaggy Dog sweaters when they were “just” $160. On sale, that price occasionally dropped to $108, but fat chance you’ll see them go that low now. At this point, you can expect a sale price of around $172.50 with J. Press’ usual 25%-off discount, which is north of what they used to sell for at full retail just a few years ago. 

There are some alternatives though. The now defunct Ralph Lauren Rugby line used to make brushed Shetlands, and every once in a while, you’ll see them still floating around eBay for between $50 and $110. The sweater isn’t as thick and densely knitted as J. Press’, but it fits slimmer and has smaller armholes (the second of which I really appreciate). It also has sueded elbow patches, but I imagine those can be carefully removed with a seam ripper if they’re not to your liking. 

Howlin’ of Morrison also has a model towards the end of this page. I really like their Shetlands (this particular piece looks fantastic), but find their brushed version a bit thin (from memory, slightly thinner than even Rugby’s). On the upside, they also fit slimmer than Press’, which might be good for some builds. 

Other options include these pieces by Edifice x Present, Present, William Fox & SonsDrake’s, John Tulloch, and Neighbour. Of those, I’ve only handled Neighbour’s, which are, again, thinner but potentially better fitting. Some of the prices here aren’t that much cheaper than what J. Press is asking, but it’s nice to have options when sale season comes. I also think there’s a potential for the York Street version to go on deeper discount than J. Press’ mainline stuff, but only time will tell. 

Lastly, MKI also used to carry some last year, but they’ve since sold out. Might be worth keeping an eye on their webstore to see if they’ll restock.