How a T-Shirt is Made
Following my post yesterday on the problem with country-of-origin labels, a reader of ours forwarded me some links to this NPR story about how some of the NPR’s promotional t-shirts are made (you know, the kind of t-shirts you get when you pledge money to a radio show). The story goes through the production process step-by-step - from the growing of the cotton to the cut-and-sewing of the garment - and it’s impressive to hear how many countries can be involved in even the making of a simple t-shirt. 
The first update to this story was posted just this past Wednesday (it’s a short 15-minute radio clip, and makes for a good listen). To learn more, you can check out the project’s Kickstarter page and Tumblr blog. 
(Thanks to Matt for the links!)

How a T-Shirt is Made

Following my post yesterday on the problem with country-of-origin labels, a reader of ours forwarded me some links to this NPR story about how some of the NPR’s promotional t-shirts are made (you know, the kind of t-shirts you get when you pledge money to a radio show). The story goes through the production process step-by-step - from the growing of the cotton to the cut-and-sewing of the garment - and it’s impressive to hear how many countries can be involved in even the making of a simple t-shirt. 

The first update to this story was posted just this past Wednesday (it’s a short 15-minute radio clip, and makes for a good listen). To learn more, you can check out the project’s Kickstarter page and Tumblr blog

(Thanks to Matt for the links!)

“Many people still associate Chinese-made product with inferior quality, just as Japanese electronics were once considered junk, but those of us who have actually visited facilities in China know that they are not far off from the potential of eclipsing Italy in terms of production of quality garments.” —  Jeffery Diduch