How Clothes are Made

If you’ve ever wondered how clothes are made, Saddiq — who’s not only a clothing designer, but also a Bay Area DJ and a friend and former student of Jesse’s mom — breaks it down here from start to finish. Saddiq mostly makes shirts and hoodies for hip people, but whether you’re doing abstractly cut button-ups or a basic pair of chinos, the process for cut-and-sewns is largely the same. (Suit jackets and sport coats will be slightly different, as there’s more “construction” that goes into the chest). 

(Thanks to Judith for the link!)

A New Way of Making Shoes

Here’s something awesome. Eugenia Morpurgo and Juan Montero have come up with a new manufacturing system for shoes. Through laser cutters and 3D printers, they’re able to produce design patterns, and then have those patterns transformed into separate components, which they assemble by hand without the need for stitches or glue. Their idea is to take the process of shoe production and bring it directly to the consumer. So, instead of having your shoes made in England or China, the “factory” would be brought into your local store, where you can choose what you want and have your shoes made within an hour. 

The system at the moment is still more of a novelty than anything practical, but if it develops, it could have a lot of interesting consequences. For example, it could reduce waste and the need for overproduction, as well as the size of storage facilities necessary for producing and selling footwear. This, of course, could greatly lower our environmental impact. It could also blow open the doors for collaboration and customization, as the manufacturing process becomes more digitalized. And, perhaps if these systems become cheap enough, maybe one day you can have one in your own home, so that you can design shoes based off of templates you’ve downloaded from the web. 

You can learn more about the project at Don’t Run (the project’s name) and Domus

How a T-Shirt is Made
Following my post yesterday on the problem with country-of-origin labels, a reader of ours forwarded me some links to this NPR story about how some of the NPR’s promotional t-shirts are made (you know, the kind of t-shirts you get when you pledge money to a radio show). The story goes through the production process step-by-step - from the growing of the cotton to the cut-and-sewing of the garment - and it’s impressive to hear how many countries can be involved in even the making of a simple t-shirt. 
The first update to this story was posted just this past Wednesday (it’s a short 15-minute radio clip, and makes for a good listen). To learn more, you can check out the project’s Kickstarter page and Tumblr blog. 
(Thanks to Matt for the links!)

How a T-Shirt is Made

Following my post yesterday on the problem with country-of-origin labels, a reader of ours forwarded me some links to this NPR story about how some of the NPR’s promotional t-shirts are made (you know, the kind of t-shirts you get when you pledge money to a radio show). The story goes through the production process step-by-step - from the growing of the cotton to the cut-and-sewing of the garment - and it’s impressive to hear how many countries can be involved in even the making of a simple t-shirt. 

The first update to this story was posted just this past Wednesday (it’s a short 15-minute radio clip, and makes for a good listen). To learn more, you can check out the project’s Kickstarter page and Tumblr blog

(Thanks to Matt for the links!)

“Many people still associate Chinese-made product with inferior quality, just as Japanese electronics were once considered junk, but those of us who have actually visited facilities in China know that they are not far off from the potential of eclipsing Italy in terms of production of quality garments.” —  Jeffery Diduch