“But the question on my mind is this: Is there anyone who can actually follow someone like Cathy? Have we, the fashion industry, nurtured and nourished truly independent, informed voices who say what they really think? I think not. Too much fashion writing is fluffy drivel concerned with front-row attendees and the “hottest new trends.” And too often, it describes the clothes in only an elementary, superficial way that lacks an understanding of how garments are designed and constructed, and how they fit into a wider cultural and economic context.
What’s more, too many of the honest comments that experienced show-goers make to each other on the way out of a show never make it into print. Too many journalists have told me that their opinions are neutered by the powers that be for fear of pissing off advertisers or jeopardising relationships.”

- Imran Amed on the sorrier state of fashion criticism, following news that Cathy Horyn, the New York Times’ chief fashion critic, has resigned.

But the question on my mind is this: Is there anyone who can actually follow someone like Cathy? Have we, the fashion industry, nurtured and nourished truly independent, informed voices who say what they really think? I think not. Too much fashion writing is fluffy drivel concerned with front-row attendees and the “hottest new trends.” And too often, it describes the clothes in only an elementary, superficial way that lacks an understanding of how garments are designed and constructed, and how they fit into a wider cultural and economic context.

What’s more, too many of the honest comments that experienced show-goers make to each other on the way out of a show never make it into print. Too many journalists have told me that their opinions are neutered by the powers that be for fear of pissing off advertisers or jeopardising relationships.”

- Imran Amed on the sorrier state of fashion criticism, following news that Cathy Horyn, the New York Times’ chief fashion critic, has resigned.

In a strange bit of news, Men’s Wearhouse is apparently putting in a bid for the purchase of dress-shoe retailer Allen Edmonds. At the same time, they’re also preparing themselves against a possible hostile takeover from Jos. A. Bank. The purchase of Allen Edmonds is rumored to be in the low hundreds of millions of dollars. It’s unclear whether this will affect Jos. A. Bank’s bid for Men’s Wearhouse.

Full story at the New York Times

"The main point is: they think about it. And the whole disheveled look is, I think, on the wane."

This is a spectacular On the Street where Cunningham draws parallels between the transition between the silhouettes of the 1940s and ’50s and today. And a strong argument for putting thought into men’s clothes.

Bravo, Bill Cunningham, as usual.

(With a brief mention of yours truly on the second page)

NYT: New Wrinkle in Menswear: Shops Just For Men
The American fashion industry is starting to notice that some men don’t hate clothes.

NYT: New Wrinkle in Menswear: Shops Just For Men

The American fashion industry is starting to notice that some men don’t hate clothes.

Planet Money’s Adam Davidson describes the economics of the tailor’s art, and why it’s so tough to make a living making clothes one piece at a time.

[Had a great chat with Adam about this, btw - I think something with me will end up on Planet Money’s great podcast. - JT]

The New York Times has a great article about how clothes not only affect the way people perceive us and how we perceive ourselves, but also the way we think:

So scientists report after studying a phenomenon they call enclothed cognition: the effects of clothing on cognitive processes.
[…]
It has long been known that “clothing affects how other people perceive us as well as how we think about ourselves,” Dr. Galinsky said. Other experiments have shown that women who dress in a masculine fashion during a job interview are more likely to be hired, and a teaching assistant who wears formal clothes is perceived as more intelligent than one who dresses more casually.
But the deeper question, the researchers said, is whether the clothing you wear affects your psychological processes. Does your outfit alter how you approach and interact with the world? So Dr. Galinsky and his colleague Hajo Adam conducted three experiments in which the clothes did not vary but their symbolic meaning was manipulated.

Read more here.

The New York Times has a great article about how clothes not only affect the way people perceive us and how we perceive ourselves, but also the way we think:

So scientists report after studying a phenomenon they call enclothed cognition: the effects of clothing on cognitive processes.

[…]

It has long been known that “clothing affects how other people perceive us as well as how we think about ourselves,” Dr. Galinsky said. Other experiments have shown that women who dress in a masculine fashion during a job interview are more likely to be hired, and a teaching assistant who wears formal clothes is perceived as more intelligent than one who dresses more casually.

But the deeper question, the researchers said, is whether the clothing you wear affects your psychological processes. Does your outfit alter how you approach and interact with the world? So Dr. Galinsky and his colleague Hajo Adam conducted three experiments in which the clothes did not vary but their symbolic meaning was manipulated.

Read more here.

Above: Images from Brooks Brothers’ 1896 catalog, taken from a New York Times article about Brooks Brothers’ new Flatiron concept store.

If you haven’t already read much about the new store, you can see photos of it here. The store is supposed to cater to “college students” and “young professionals,” but the only young professional I can imagine shopping there is someone who works for a J Crew x Ralph Lauren Rugby collaboration project.

Bill Cunningham on Tailored Menswear

Bill Cunningham covers tailored menswear in his latest episode of “On the Street.”  A really, really great watch. 

(credit to MostExerent for the original tip).