Above: Images from Brooks Brothers’ 1896 catalog, taken from a New York Times article about Brooks Brothers’ new Flatiron concept store.

If you haven’t already read much about the new store, you can see photos of it here. The store is supposed to cater to “college students” and “young professionals,” but the only young professional I can imagine shopping there is someone who works for a J Crew x Ralph Lauren Rugby collaboration project.

Bill Cunningham on Tailored Menswear

Bill Cunningham covers tailored menswear in his latest episode of “On the Street.”  A really, really great watch. 

(credit to MostExerent for the original tip). 




The iron, that relic of households past, is no longer required to look neat and freshly pressed. Why bother when retailers like Nordstrom offer crisp “wrinkle-free finish” dress shirts and  L. L. Bean sells chinos that are “great right out of the dryer.”
Though it is not obvious from the label, the antiwrinkle finish comes  from a resin that releases formaldehyde, the chemical that is usually  associated with embalming fluids or dissected frogs in biology class.

New York Times: Formaldehyde in Wrinkle-Free Clothes May Pose Skin Risks
(Not to mention style risks.)

The iron, that relic of households past, is no longer required to look neat and freshly pressed. Why bother when retailers like Nordstrom offer crisp “wrinkle-free finish” dress shirts and L. L. Bean sells chinos that are “great right out of the dryer.”

Though it is not obvious from the label, the antiwrinkle finish comes from a resin that releases formaldehyde, the chemical that is usually associated with embalming fluids or dissected frogs in biology class.

New York Times: Formaldehyde in Wrinkle-Free Clothes May Pose Skin Risks

(Not to mention style risks.)

Cooking with designer/retailer Jay Kos.

Steven Alan for Dockers.  Looking pretty good, though no great savings at $128 a pop.  More info in the Times.

Steven Alan for Dockers.  Looking pretty good, though no great savings at $128 a pop.  More info in the Times.

“The cost of creating those things has nothing to do with the price. It is all about who else is wearing them, who designed them and who is selling them.” — Brand consultant David Aaker on designer markups.  But what does it cost to make designer chinos?  The Times breaks it down.