My son is ten months old and to this point, I’ve been very good about buying almost all of his clothes second-hand. My position is that there’re too many baby clothes in the world to buy new ones. Especially when they’re so often so expensive. Between the thrift store, eBay and the random gifts that enter a new parent’s life, we’ve done just fine.
I did, however, make two indulgences this week.
I bought him a Tim Lincecum baby jersey, so that he won’t grow up to be a Dodgers fan. (I live in Los Angeles, so this requires affirmative action.)
Then I bought him these Pointer Brand hickory striped overalls. And a matching hat. Because babies and toddlers look fricking tremendous dressed like train conductors.

My son is ten months old and to this point, I’ve been very good about buying almost all of his clothes second-hand. My position is that there’re too many baby clothes in the world to buy new ones. Especially when they’re so often so expensive. Between the thrift store, eBay and the random gifts that enter a new parent’s life, we’ve done just fine.

I did, however, make two indulgences this week.

I bought him a Tim Lincecum baby jersey, so that he won’t grow up to be a Dodgers fan. (I live in Los Angeles, so this requires affirmative action.)

Then I bought him these Pointer Brand hickory striped overalls. And a matching hat. Because babies and toddlers look fricking tremendous dressed like train conductors.

howtotalktogirlsatparties:

What you know bout real menswear, doe?

This gentleman appears to have entered a contest, the challenge of which is to wear all of mens clothings at once.

howtotalktogirlsatparties:

What you know bout real menswear, doe?

This gentleman appears to have entered a contest, the challenge of which is to wear all of mens clothings at once.

(Source: downeastandout)

A wodnerful vintage advertisement, via the always-fascinating An Ambitious Project Collapsing.
Note that the selling point here is generous cut.  “No skimping of cloth.  There’s comfort in every fold.”  It wasn’t until the middle of the 20th century that fabric became cheap enough (and consumer culture pervasive enough, and consumers wealthy enough) that amply-cut clothes no longer were a sign of wealth in the first world. 

A wodnerful vintage advertisement, via the always-fascinating An Ambitious Project Collapsing.

Note that the selling point here is generous cut.  “No skimping of cloth.  There’s comfort in every fold.”  It wasn’t until the middle of the 20th century that fabric became cheap enough (and consumer culture pervasive enough, and consumers wealthy enough) that amply-cut clothes no longer were a sign of wealth in the first world.