BespoKenN recently showed me these flannel trousers by Paul Stuart. For those unfamiliar with flannel, it’s a densely packed, soft fabric that has wool fibers of varying lengths laying in different directions. The close up pictures here show it well. The fabric can come in various weights and it always feels amazingly comfortable. It’s also very efficient at trapping heat, so it’s great for the fall and winter seasons.

I have a few flannel trousers in various shades of grey and brown, but have been wondering what would be the next best color to get them in. I’ve been contemplating olive, and after seeing these Paul Stuart flannels, I think I’ve come to the right decision.

Fall and Winter Gloves

Depending on where you live, it may be time to start wearing gloves. When buying a pair, I recommend you avoid cotton, acrylic, and synthetic leathers; they’re neither warm nor durable. Wool or cashmere can work if they’re tightly knit. I wear Filson’s fingerless wool gloves when I go jogging (they also come in a full fingered variety). For people who are always on electronic devices, there’s also Freehands.

For something a bit sharper looking, try leather gloves. These can be made out of any number of animal skins. Peccary is luxurious and soft, while hairsheep is finer and less bulky. Deerskin has a “tacky” surface that’s good for gripping, but it’s a bit more rugged in appearance. There are also hogskin gloves, which are very hard-wearing.

Additionally, there are the linings. If you plan to use these in cold weather, you’ll want the inside of the gloves lined with cashmere or silk. Cashmere will be softer and warmer, but also a bit bulkier. If you’re going to wear them in a cool climate, opt for a pair that’s unlined. They won’t be as warm, but they’ll be more durable and fit better.

Colorwise, black and brown are the most versatile, but like with shoes and suits, I find black to be overrated. I have a few pairs of gloves that match the range of colors in my shoes - merlot, dark brown, mid-brown, and tan. When I want to add a bit of texture or visual interest, I wear dark green capeskin or grey suede lambskin. I also recently ordered some yellow chamois, which are the classic gentleman’s gloves, but they’ve yet to arrive.

As for where you can buy a a good pair, I recommend Dents and Pickett. American retailers such as Ralph Lauren, Brooks Brothers, Paul Stuart, Hickey Freeman, and Ben Silver also sell very good models. The upside to buying from them is that they often hold seasonal sales. For something a bit more affordable, Nordstrom’s house brand is a pretty good value. Finally, remember that the most important part of a glove is the fit - you want something that fits and flatters your hand. If you’re not able to find a proper pair, try getting custom gloves through Chester Jefferies or Madova. Both will make a glove for you if you send in a tracing of your hand, but I find that photocopies or scans work best.

Ties for Fall

The first photo above has haunted me ever since I first saw it at 13th and Wolf. It’s what I would consider the perfect fall tie. The colors are warm, the pattern is simple but interesting, and the wool fabric gives the tie a nice, soft appearance. Together, these characteristics make it the perfect expression of fall. 

While we may never own a tie so ideal, there are some great ties to take advantage of this season. Here are seven types that you should consider:

  • Most of your seasonal ties for fall should be made (at least in part) out wool. These can come in many forms - wool challis, wool flannel, tweed, etc. Challis is a plain weave that feels supple and lightweight; flannel will have a soft, brushed nap; and tweed will be a bit rougher. Like with silk ties, a solid color can work well if the fabric has a bit of texture to it (eg brushed flannel). For something slightly more interesting, you can also get a plain colored tie, but one with a slightly mottled weave or herringbone pattern. My favorites, however, are wool ties with small geometric patterns, stripes, or checks such as windowpanes. A number of tweed ties also come speckled, which can be interesting. 
  • Like wool ties, cashmere ties also make for excellent fall staples. Since the material is more luxurious, they will typically cost a bit more than wool, however. Since they’re softer, they also don’t typically wear as well.
  • Another traditional fall tie is the ancient madder. Ancient madder ties are distinguished by their muted hues, traditional patterns (often with paisleys) and their soft, matte finish. You’ll find beautifully deep, soft, matte colorings, such as mustard yellow, jade green, and indigo blue. They’re produced on a special “gum” silk, and when handled, they have a hefty, chalky hand similar to fine suede. They can come in paisley or any number of small, geometric designs.
  • I had a phase once where I went a little tartan crazy. Now I find that with the exception of black watch, it’s hard to wear tartan ties. However, one thing they go excellently with is a tweed jacket. It makes sense given how popular the two are in Scotland. If you own a tweed jacket, I don’t recommend you go out and buy ten tartan ties like I did, but maybe buy one. 
  • Your regular run of woven silk ties can still feel seasonal. Just keep your colors autumnal - burgundy, chocolate, hunter green, and pale gold are all good colors to stand by. 

So where to buy some of these ties? My favorite shops are Drake’s (pictured above), Sam Hober, Paul Stuart, Ralph Lauren, and J Press. Additionally, some excellent options are available at Howard Yount, Mountain and Sackett, and Ovadia and Sons. For those looking for something more affordable, Land’s End also has a couple of handsome wools for between $50 and $60.

Finally, note that seasonal ties aren’t a necessity. You can still obviously wear your regular rotation of silk ties - grenadines and knits are still great ties to wear regardless of the season. It’s just that having a seasonal touch here and there can be fun, and the above are good options to consider.  

The “Steals & Deals” section of The Rider Boot Co.’s store has some really excellent stuff at the moment, at really excellent prices. Rider’s own designs are sometimes a bit nutty, but there are some attractive choices, too. Perhaps most notable is a modest selection of Grenson shoes, made to a very high standard for a men’s retailer whose name rhymes with Stall Puart - all for less than $200 a pair. Get in on the fun here.

The “Steals & Deals” section of The Rider Boot Co.’s store has some really excellent stuff at the moment, at really excellent prices. Rider’s own designs are sometimes a bit nutty, but there are some attractive choices, too. Perhaps most notable is a modest selection of Grenson shoes, made to a very high standard for a men’s retailer whose name rhymes with Stall Puart - all for less than $200 a pair. Get in on the fun here.

eBay Round Up
Here’s the first eBay Round Up for this week. Also note that Brooks Brothers, J Press, and Paul Stuart are having some sales right now. You may want to check those out as well. 
Reiss jacket, L
Surface to Air bomber, L
APC Breton shirt, L
Whitehouse Cox wallet
Ralph Lauren Purple Label aviators, 53
Ralph Lauren briefcase
Gieves and Hawkes buckshot brogues, UK 12
Optimo Panama hat, 6 1/4
Quilted Beretta jacket, 48
Gieves overcoat, 44
Richard James shirts with seahorses
Harrods silk dressing gown, XL
It’s On eBay
Paul Stuart (by Grenson) Loafers (11C)
Start at $9.99 or BIN $79.99

It’s On eBay

Paul Stuart (by Grenson) Loafers (11C)

Start at $9.99 or BIN $79.99

The silk grenadine tie is so-called for its distinctively textured weave.  It’s typically (though not exclusively) manufactured in solid colors.  The value of the grenadine tie is that its solid color makes it easy to pair with busier shirts and coats, and its texture gives it visual interest.  This makes the grenadine the perfect jack-of-all-trades tie, particularly in simple colors like black, navy and burgundy.  Many designers make grenadines from time to time, but you can reliably find them at J. Press, Paul Stuart and Turnbull & Asser.  For a similar price (but a longer wait), they can be ordered bespoke from Sam Hober, who will make them to your length & width specifications.

The silk grenadine tie is so-called for its distinctively textured weave.  It’s typically (though not exclusively) manufactured in solid colors.  The value of the grenadine tie is that its solid color makes it easy to pair with busier shirts and coats, and its texture gives it visual interest.  This makes the grenadine the perfect jack-of-all-trades tie, particularly in simple colors like black, navy and burgundy.  Many designers make grenadines from time to time, but you can reliably find them at J. Press, Paul Stuart and Turnbull & Asser.  For a similar price (but a longer wait), they can be ordered bespoke from Sam Hober, who will make them to your length & width specifications.