An Affordable Spring Look
Outerwear tends to be expensive, but it doesn’t have to be. Depending on your budget, you can get relatively affordable coats and jackets nowadays from Club Monaco, J. Crew, Brooks Brothers, and Ralph Lauren. At the end of every season, they’ll have nice looking designs for about $150-200 (Brooks Brothers and Ralph Lauren have really good mid-season sales as well). More affordably, there’s Pointer’s chore coat for $87. It looks pretty good if you like workwear.   
For rainy days, I sometimes wear LL Bean’s Trail Model Rain Jacket with jeans, a Shetland sweater, and some LL Bean boots. The shell is made from a waterproof rip stop nylon and the interior seams are taped. The pocket bags are also made of mesh, so that if you store away any wet things, they’ll dry quicker. The best part? It’s $79. Possibly $71 if you wait for one of LL Bean’s occasional 10% off coupons. Additionally, they have a similar jacket this season under their “Signature” line. Although I haven’t handled it, the jacket looks like it comes without a chest logo (which the mainline does, unfortunately, although it’s tonal). I also assume it fits slimmer all around.
In the photo above, I’ve paired my LL Bean rain jacket with an oxford cloth button down shirt from Ascot Chang, a Shetland sweater from O’Connell’s, and a pair of straight legged jeans from 3sixteen. All of these tend to be a bit on the pricey side, but you can find more affordable alternatives at a number of places. Brooks Brothers will have oxford cloth button downs for about $50 during sale season, while Kamakura sells them for about $79 year round. More affordable Shetlands can be had for about $75-100 at Brooks Brothers and LL Bean when they’re on discount (although they don’t always carry them). Lastly, raw selvedge denim jeans can be had for about $89 from our advertiser Gustin, or $82 from Unbranded. Both get regularly recommended in the denim community.
Together, these pieces make for a reasonably classic look, and more importantly, can be had for not too much money. 

An Affordable Spring Look

Outerwear tends to be expensive, but it doesn’t have to be. Depending on your budget, you can get relatively affordable coats and jackets nowadays from Club Monaco, J. Crew, Brooks Brothers, and Ralph Lauren. At the end of every season, they’ll have nice looking designs for about $150-200 (Brooks Brothers and Ralph Lauren have really good mid-season sales as well). More affordably, there’s Pointer’s chore coat for $87. It looks pretty good if you like workwear.   

For rainy days, I sometimes wear LL Bean’s Trail Model Rain Jacket with jeans, a Shetland sweater, and some LL Bean boots. The shell is made from a waterproof rip stop nylon and the interior seams are taped. The pocket bags are also made of mesh, so that if you store away any wet things, they’ll dry quicker. The best part? It’s $79. Possibly $71 if you wait for one of LL Bean’s occasional 10% off coupons. Additionally, they have a similar jacket this season under their “Signature” line. Although I haven’t handled it, the jacket looks like it comes without a chest logo (which the mainline does, unfortunately, although it’s tonal). I also assume it fits slimmer all around.

In the photo above, I’ve paired my LL Bean rain jacket with an oxford cloth button down shirt from Ascot Chang, a Shetland sweater from O’Connell’s, and a pair of straight legged jeans from 3sixteen. All of these tend to be a bit on the pricey side, but you can find more affordable alternatives at a number of places. Brooks Brothers will have oxford cloth button downs for about $50 during sale season, while Kamakura sells them for about $79 year round. More affordable Shetlands can be had for about $75-100 at Brooks Brothers and LL Bean when they’re on discount (although they don’t always carry them). Lastly, raw selvedge denim jeans can be had for about $89 from our advertiser Gustin, or $82 from Unbranded. Both get regularly recommended in the denim community.

Together, these pieces make for a reasonably classic look, and more importantly, can be had for not too much money. 

I was interested to read about Pointer Brand in today’s New York Times. The brand is owned and made by L.C. King Manufacturing, the oldest clothing factory in the US still owned by its founding family. They’ve had a reputation for years now; I bought some Pointer hickory stripe overalls and a railroad cap for my boy a year or so ago, and have been very happy with them.
I took a look at their overhauled website (they recently hired a new marketing department/guy), and while its aesthetic is more of the same Americana, at least it’s earned in this case.
Most interesting is that they’ve developed some five-pocket jeans for their Pointer brand. They look like a pretty traditional straight fit, and are made from American denim. They cost just under $65, which is a bit more than the alternative, a pair of 501s from Levis, but is nonetheless a lot less than fashion-y selvedge alternatives, even on the low end. If anyone has any experience with them, drop us a line and tell us what you think of the fit.

I was interested to read about Pointer Brand in today’s New York Times. The brand is owned and made by L.C. King Manufacturing, the oldest clothing factory in the US still owned by its founding family. They’ve had a reputation for years now; I bought some Pointer hickory stripe overalls and a railroad cap for my boy a year or so ago, and have been very happy with them.

I took a look at their overhauled website (they recently hired a new marketing department/guy), and while its aesthetic is more of the same Americana, at least it’s earned in this case.

Most interesting is that they’ve developed some five-pocket jeans for their Pointer brand. They look like a pretty traditional straight fit, and are made from American denim. They cost just under $65, which is a bit more than the alternative, a pair of 501s from Levis, but is nonetheless a lot less than fashion-y selvedge alternatives, even on the low end. If anyone has any experience with them, drop us a line and tell us what you think of the fit.

My son is ten months old and to this point, I’ve been very good about buying almost all of his clothes second-hand. My position is that there’re too many baby clothes in the world to buy new ones. Especially when they’re so often so expensive. Between the thrift store, eBay and the random gifts that enter a new parent’s life, we’ve done just fine.
I did, however, make two indulgences this week.
I bought him a Tim Lincecum baby jersey, so that he won’t grow up to be a Dodgers fan. (I live in Los Angeles, so this requires affirmative action.)
Then I bought him these Pointer Brand hickory striped overalls. And a matching hat. Because babies and toddlers look fricking tremendous dressed like train conductors.

My son is ten months old and to this point, I’ve been very good about buying almost all of his clothes second-hand. My position is that there’re too many baby clothes in the world to buy new ones. Especially when they’re so often so expensive. Between the thrift store, eBay and the random gifts that enter a new parent’s life, we’ve done just fine.

I did, however, make two indulgences this week.

I bought him a Tim Lincecum baby jersey, so that he won’t grow up to be a Dodgers fan. (I live in Los Angeles, so this requires affirmative action.)

Then I bought him these Pointer Brand hickory striped overalls. And a matching hat. Because babies and toddlers look fricking tremendous dressed like train conductors.