“Even worse, [the Foreign Service] were often further described as having stripes on their pants. Nineteen-fifties-era Republican Sen. Joe McCarthy had this in mind when he lambasted Secretary of State Dean Acheson as a “pompous diplomat in striped pants.” That’s right, he wore stripes. Can you believe it? It’s a wonder he created NATO and designed the Marshall Plan while wearing those ridiculous things. It remains unclear exactly why stripes on pants signify weakness—maybe workers who donned suits weren’t working the land like real men—but the connection endures. More than 60 years after McCarthy’s insult, Rush Limbaugh is still attacking those not man enough to put on some solid-colored trousers. The “stripes-pants crowd up in Foggy Bottom,” the radio host told listeners last year, were “all atwitter” that Obama thought of striking Syria without congressional approval.”

Jordan Michael Smith writes in Politico about the history of conservatives marking liberals as effete, affluent, out-of-touch “eggheads.” One of the points he mentions is the appellation “striped-pants,” as applied to the Foreign Service. Smith doesn’t say it, but one presumes that this phrase, attached to diplomats, may refer to morning dress, the form of daytime formal dress that pairs a dark coat and contrasting waistcoat with striped gray pants.

I’m sure it wasn’t the first controversy over diplomacy and formal dress. When the Japanese Prime Minister visited a shrine to that nation’s World War II dead, it set off an international firestorm. Partly, this was because of the solemnity and “officialness” lent to the visit by the fact he was wearing formal garb.

New York Daily News: Anthony Weiner gets 2 legs up on NYC mayoral competitors with bright trousers
“Is it a blatant attempt to get the gay vote?” menswear designer Jeffrey Banks asked regarding Weiner wearing red pants last week to the Greenwich Village rally celebrating the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay marriage ruling. “Is the casual look an attempt to make him seem more accessible?”

New York Daily News: Anthony Weiner gets 2 legs up on NYC mayoral competitors with bright trousers

“Is it a blatant attempt to get the gay vote?” menswear designer Jeffrey Banks asked regarding Weiner wearing red pants last week to the Greenwich Village rally celebrating the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay marriage ruling. “Is the casual look an attempt to make him seem more accessible?”

Andy Sullivan from Reuters called yesterday, wondering what I thought of Paul Ryan’s style choices. The answer is that I don’t think much of them.

Andy Sullivan from Reuters called yesterday, wondering what I thought of Paul Ryan’s style choices. The answer is that I don’t think much of them.

evolvingstyle:

This is Tommy Douglas. He was the premier of Saskatchewan, when his party, the CCF, became the first socialist government in North America. The CCF eventually became the NDP.
Check those trousers. Can you imagine a politician these days making such a bold sartorial choice? It seems like everything is so test grouped that politicians lose their personal quirks. 

This is actually a very conservative choice, or at least was at the time. This is semi-formal day wear - a stroller, specifically. Black double-breasted jacket and gray striped or patterned pants is the more casual version of formal clothing for the day. It’s what a banker or lawyer would have worn in much of the English-speaking world in the early part of the 20th century. It’s still worn in most of the former British Empire for weddings during the day.
The last US President to wear some version of formal day clothing was Ronald Reagan.

evolvingstyle:

This is Tommy Douglas. He was the premier of Saskatchewan, when his party, the CCF, became the first socialist government in North America. The CCF eventually became the NDP.

Check those trousers. Can you imagine a politician these days making such a bold sartorial choice? It seems like everything is so test grouped that politicians lose their personal quirks. 

This is actually a very conservative choice, or at least was at the time. This is semi-formal day wear - a stroller, specifically. Black double-breasted jacket and gray striped or patterned pants is the more casual version of formal clothing for the day. It’s what a banker or lawyer would have worn in much of the English-speaking world in the early part of the 20th century. It’s still worn in most of the former British Empire for weddings during the day.

The last US President to wear some version of formal day clothing was Ronald Reagan.

Sometimes you dress to fit in, sometimes you dress to be noticed. 
Above: New York Gubernatorial candidate Jimmy McMillan, of The Rent Is Too Damn High Party.

Sometimes you dress to fit in, sometimes you dress to be noticed. 

Above: New York Gubernatorial candidate Jimmy McMillan, of The Rent Is Too Damn High Party.

Lots of folks have been emailing me about this New York Post story which reports that New York mayor Michael Bloomberg has only two pairs of work shoes.  Of course, Bloomberg is extraordinarily rich, thanks to his business information empire, so he can afford as many pairs of shoes as he’d like, so the story is, “he’s so thrifty!”
There are only two problems with this narrative, in my mind:
A)  He has like half a dozen mansions, so… thrifty he ain’t.
B)  They’re both loafers.  Loafers with suits?  BOOO. 
Anyway, if you want to talk about true-blue political thrifty-shoe style heroes, it begins and ends with Adlai Stevenson.

Lots of folks have been emailing me about this New York Post story which reports that New York mayor Michael Bloomberg has only two pairs of work shoes.  Of course, Bloomberg is extraordinarily rich, thanks to his business information empire, so he can afford as many pairs of shoes as he’d like, so the story is, “he’s so thrifty!”

There are only two problems with this narrative, in my mind:

A)  He has like half a dozen mansions, so… thrifty he ain’t.

B)  They’re both loafers.  Loafers with suits?  BOOO. 

Anyway, if you want to talk about true-blue political thrifty-shoe style heroes, it begins and ends with Adlai Stevenson.