Rudiments: Black Suits

Dave Hill explains how and when to wear a black suit, from our latest episode. You can watch the whole episode (please do!) right here.

Elegance: Put This On Season Two, Episode Five

Put This On, a web series about dressing like a grownup, visits Milan, a world fashion capital.

In this episode, our director Benjamin Ahr Harrison visits Biella, north of the city, to talk with Luciano Barbera. Barbera isn’t just one of the world’s most elegant men, he’s also the leader of Carlo Barbera, one of the finest fabric mills in existence.

For our PTO Place segment, we talk with the owner of G. Lorenzi. It started as a cutlery shop, and has become a spectacular tribute to the finest small accessories imaginable. It’s home to a visually stunning spectrum of knives, scissors, shaving goods, toothbrushes, combs, shoehorns and other tiny necessities.

In PTO Man, we visit Salvatore Battello, the elegant owner of W-D Man. Before he started his line, he ran one of the last companies in the world that worked with shagreen - the beautiful skin of sharks and rays. Battello tells us about his passion for vintage fabric, and his definition of elegance.

Plus Jesse answers the question “what color shoes go with the suit?” and Dave Hill offers a rudiment on the topic of socks.

This is the fifth episode in our six-episode second season. In this season, we visit the three greatest men’s style cities in the world, as chosen by our readers - New York, Milan and London.

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Watch it elsewhere:

Vimeo / Youtube / iTunes

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Buy Season One on DVD for $16

This episode was supported by our viewers.


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Executive Producers: Jesse Thorn & Adam Lisagor

Director: Benjamin Ahr Harrison

Host / Writer / Producer: Jesse Thorn

Rudiments: Dave Hill

Producer: Gianluca Migliarotti

Director of Photography: Daniele Vascelli

Sound: Daniele Belli

Editor: Todd Thoenig and Benjamin Ahr Harrison

Subtitle Translation: Giovanni D’Amico

Put This On: Rudiments: Sport Sunglasses

Excerpted from S2E3 of Put This On: “(New) Traditions”

Dave Hill offers thoughts on when you should and should not wear sports sunglasses.

Put This On Season Two, Episode 2: Eclecticism

Put This On, a web series about dressing like a grownup, visits New York City, where eclectic style is a way of life.

We go thrifting with Josh and Trav from the blog Street Etiquette. They’re known for their thrift-store eyes and their unique editorials. We drop some shopping and alteration knowledge and have a friendly competition: who can pick up the coolest stuff in three shops and two hours?

Visit Jay Kos, the eclectic boutique that fuses traditional style with a decidedly non-traditional palette. It’s a favorite of modern dandies because of Jay’s bold color sense and wild material choices. Here you can find traditionally-made trousers in green python or a fine Italian sportcoat rendered in a blown-up flannel shirting pattern.

Meet Lewis Lapham, the found of Lapham’s Quarterly and longtime editor of Harper’s Magazine. Lapham discusses why fine clothes suit the humble journalist, and compares a coat and tie to the pair of gold coins Flaubert carried in his pocket - they lend the bearer a sense of weight.

In our How It’s Made segment, we learn what’s inside your jacket. Tailor Leonard Logsdail tears open a few coats to show us their guts and compares the construction of pieces at a variety of price points.

Plus, the return of Rudiments with new host Dave Hill. Dave explains that a coat isn’t finished until it has been altered by a tailor.

This is the second episode in our six-episode second season. In this season, we visit the three greatest men’s style cities in the world, as chosen by our readers - New York, Milan and London.

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Watch it elsewhere:

Vimeo / Youtube / iTunes


—-

Buy Season One on DVD for $16

This episode was supported by our viewers and by The Put This On Gentlemen’s Association.


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Executive Producers: Jesse Thorn & Adam Lisagor

Director: Benjamin Ahr Harrison

Host / Writer / Producer: Jesse Thorn

Rudiments: Dave Hill

Producer: Andrew Yamato

Director of Photography: Ryan Samul

Sound: Andrew J. Reardon

PTO Rudiments: Alterations

"A suit should look good off the rack, then you should have it altered to look great. Budget $100, and about two weeks, because the transformation isn’t free, or instantaneous." - Dave Hill

From Season 2, Episode 2 of Put This On

Avoid shiny clothing.

Avoid shiny clothing.

Twenty-Five Pieces of Basic Sartorial Knowledge So You Don’t Look Dumb

When I’m interviewed about men’s style and Put This On, I’m almost invariably asked “what are the fashion mistakes you see men make every day?” or “what is the most basic style knowledge men often don’t have?”

That’s the kind of stuff I usually leave off this blog. After all: you’re discerning and tasteful! But every time I see some incredibly basic principle violated, I cringe. So: for the benefit of your slovenly coworker our your teenage cousin or your uncle who’s never had a job, I wrote this. Forward it to them. Anonymously, if you must.

Below are twenty-five pieces of vital information that every man over 14 in the Western world should know. Every man. No excuses. Seriously. Seriously.

  1. Unbutton the bottom button of your jacket. It’s not intended to be buttoned.
  2. Same goes for your vest.
  3. Remove the tags on the sleeves of your jacket before you wear it.
  4. Jackets sometimes come with white basting thread on their shoulders or holding closed their vents. Remove this thread before wearing the jacket.
  5. Jacket pockets are intended to be opened. Use a small scissor or seam ripper.
  6. More than three jacket buttons is never appropriate for anything.
  7. On a three-button coat, buttoning the top button is optional, and some lapels are rolled so as to make the top button ornamental. In other words: if buttoning the top button seems wrong, it is.
  8. Brown shoes, brown belt. Black shoes, black belt.
  9. Belt or suspenders. Never belt and suspenders.
  10. Your jacket sleeve should be short enough to show some shirt cuff - about half an inch. 
  11. Your pants should end at your shoes without puddling. A slight or half break means that there is one modest inflection point in the front crease. If your pants break both front and back or if they break on the sides, they’re too long.
  12. Your coat should follow and flatter the lines of your upper body, not pool around them. You should be able to slip a hand in to get to your inside breast pocket, but if the jacket’s closed and you can pound your heart with your fist, it’s too big.
  13. When you buy a suit or sportcoat, it should be altered to fit by a tailor. This will cost between $25 and $100.
  14. Your tie should reach your belt line - it shouldn’t end above your belt or below it.
  15. Your tie knot should have a dimple.
  16. Only wear a tie if you’re also wearing a suit or sportcoat (or, very casually, a sweater). Shirt, tie and no jacket is the wedding uniform of a nine-year-old.
  17. The only men who should wear black suits during the day are priests, undertakers, secret agents, funerals attendees and yokels.
  18. Cell phone holsters are horrible.
  19. So are square-toed shoes.
  20. Never wear visible socks with shorts.
  21. Or any socks with sandals.
  22. If your shirt is tucked in, you should be wearing a belt (or suspenders, if you’re wearing a jacket as well, or your trousers should have side adjusters and no belt loops).
  23. Flip flops are great for the pool and the beach and not great for anything else. (Some say this is a matter of taste. We agree. If you have any taste, you will only wear flip-flops at the beach or pool.)
  24. Long ties are not appropriate with a tuxedo.
  25. Never wear polyester outside of the gym or theme parties.

If you see someone violating one of these basic principles, feel free to send them our way. We’ll straighten them out.

Q and Answer: Release The Vents
Joel writes: Recently my girlfriend tried to tell me that the little pieces of thread  that hold the flaps on the back of my blazers and sport coats together  needed to be cut. I’m skeptical. What’s your take?
Never listen to your girlfriend on matters sartorial.  What do girlfriends know about men’s clothes?  They are ladies.
That said, do listen to us.  Your girlfriend is right.  The purpose of the vents in the back of the suit is to allow the “flaps” to move independently of each other.  That little bit of thread is only there to keep the presentation clean on the rack.  (You should also take the tag off the sleeve and open up the pockets.)

Q and Answer: Release The Vents

Joel writes: Recently my girlfriend tried to tell me that the little pieces of thread that hold the flaps on the back of my blazers and sport coats together needed to be cut. I’m skeptical. What’s your take?

Never listen to your girlfriend on matters sartorial.  What do girlfriends know about men’s clothes?  They are ladies.

That said, do listen to us.  Your girlfriend is right.  The purpose of the vents in the back of the suit is to allow the “flaps” to move independently of each other.  That little bit of thread is only there to keep the presentation clean on the rack.  (You should also take the tag off the sleeve and open up the pockets.)