marcguyot:

Details.

French clothing genius/madman Marc Guyot has a tumblr. It is essentially a compendium of Sartorial Power Moves.

Atlanta brothers Andre and Keith Churchwell looking brilliant on a summer evening, in a photo from A Suitable Wardrobe. Two of the world’s best-dressed men pulling off colored dinner jackets perfectly. The off-white dinner jacket is a summer staple - great for warm weather and less-serious black tie events. The relaxed elegance of the shawl lapel matches this tone perfectly. Light blue is a little tougher to pull off, a real sartorial power move, but Andre Churchwell couldn’t be pulling it off better.

And by the way: note Andre’s opera pumps, always the most elegant evening footwear choice. You can try and tell him he looks feminine if you want to. I’ll be too busy telling him he looks spectacular.

This Guy Gets It.

It’s On eBay
J. Press Patchwork Tweed Blazer
I will send ten dollars to anyone who buys this and wears it successfully.  I’m thinking cream button-down shirt, maroon rep tie, brown cords?  Oh, yeah, and huge, pendulous, swinging balls.
Starts at $35, ends Monday

It’s On eBay

J. Press Patchwork Tweed Blazer

I will send ten dollars to anyone who buys this and wears it successfully.  I’m thinking cream button-down shirt, maroon rep tie, brown cords?  Oh, yeah, and huge, pendulous, swinging balls.

Starts at $35, ends Monday

ethosophical-deactivated2012072 said: What tie knot(s) should I use and when should I use them?

Q and Answer: How Should I Tie My Tie?

You should use the four-in-hand knot.  It suits any type of collar, is formal enough but not too fussy, and has been favored by the most stylish men for nearly a century now.  The Windsors, it should be said, uniformly use it.

If you’re shorter and your tie longer, or if you prefer a larger knot, you can use the double four in hand.  This is simple enough - just circle your tie around twice, rather than once, before passing it behind, up over and through.

If you require a large knot for a very spread collar, or if you prefer symmetry to style, the half-Windsor knot is acceptable, though not recommended.  The full Windsor knot is for dicks.

The tip of your tie should roughly meet your belt buckle.  It shouldn’t be any shorter than the top of your belt line, and shouldn’t reach beyond your belt line.

When possible, the two blades of your tie should be the same length.  This will typically depend on your height, of course, unless you choose custom ties.  Some very stylish men have worn the rear blade longer than the front, sometimes tucking it into their waistband.  This is pretty great, but it’s also a Sartorial Power Move.

There’s no need to place the rear blade of the tie in its keeper.  That’s a little fussy.