Put This On: Season Two
For the second season of Put This On, we take to the road and visit New York City, London, and Milan — arguably some of the most stylish cities in the world — to investigate what makes each place special. Below, a recap of our episodes. You can also check out our first season here.


The Melting Pot: A look at what makes NYC diverse. Jesse talks to ‘Lo Heads — a collective of Polo Ralph Lauren enthusiasts whose style originated on the streets of NYC. Then he stops by Worth & Worth, one of the city’s best hat shops, and later talks to Jason Marshall, a jazz musician with a love for tailoring. Finally, some tips on how to pack for a trip.

Eclecticism: More on NYC’s eclecticism. Jesse visits Jay Kos, a boutique that mixes the traditional and non-traditional, and goes thrifting with the guys behind Street Etiquette. Next, a chat with writer and editor Lewis Lapham about his view on clothes (one of my favorite segments, personally), and then a dissection of a suit with bespoke tailor Leonard Logsdail.  

(New) Traditions: Jesse visits some of the best London has to offer when it comes to traditional style. Savile Row’s Richard Anderson and Norton & Sons, the basement of legendary cloth supplier W. Bill, and one of menswear’s most beloved neckwear producers, Drake’s. Ian Bruce of The Correspondents also talks about his personal style.

Eccentric Style: The eccentric side of London. Guy Hills’ inventive tweeds, David Saxby’s vintage and vintage-repro offerings, and Cordings’ unique outdoor clothes. Jesse also shows us the different ways you can tie a scarf.  

Elegance: For those who love Italian style, this is the first of two episodes on Milan. This episode has an interview with Luciano Barbera (arguably one of the best dressed men today), a visit to G. Lorenzi (arguably one of the best menswear stores in the world, although they’ve since closed up shop and become Cedes Milano), and a chat with Salvatore Battello, the elegant owner of W-D Man. Plus, Jesse goes over what color of shoes you can wear with what color suits (or trousers in general, really).

Consolidation: Big brands such as Gucci and Prada are increasingly taking over Milan’s fashion business, squeezing out some of the smaller operations. Jesse visits some of these smaller artisans and shops, including bespoke shoemaker Antonio Pio Mele and the beautiful boutique 10 Corso Como. 
Extras: Lastly, some extras, including my favorite of all PTO segments, a short feature on menswear writer Bruce Boyer. David Hill also asks some hard questions at New York’s Fashion Week, and our director Ben Harrison visits the FIT Museum’s exhibit on 1930s fashion.
Again, many thanks to our funders for their support! 
(Photo by Zac Wolf)

Put This On: Season Two

For the second season of Put This On, we take to the road and visit New York City, London, and Milan — arguably some of the most stylish cities in the world — to investigate what makes each place special. Below, a recap of our episodes. You can also check out our first season here.


The Melting Pot: A look at what makes NYC diverse. Jesse talks to ‘Lo Heads — a collective of Polo Ralph Lauren enthusiasts whose style originated on the streets of NYC. Then he stops by Worth & Worth, one of the city’s best hat shops, and later talks to Jason Marshall, a jazz musician with a love for tailoring. Finally, some tips on how to pack for a trip.


Eclecticism: More on NYC’s eclecticism. Jesse visits Jay Kos, a boutique that mixes the traditional and non-traditional, and goes thrifting with the guys behind Street Etiquette. Next, a chat with writer and editor Lewis Lapham about his view on clothes (one of my favorite segments, personally), and then a dissection of a suit with bespoke tailor Leonard Logsdail.  


(New) Traditions: Jesse visits some of the best London has to offer when it comes to traditional style. Savile Row’s Richard Anderson and Norton & Sons, the basement of legendary cloth supplier W. Bill, and one of menswear’s most beloved neckwear producers, Drake’s. Ian Bruce of The Correspondents also talks about his personal style.


Eccentric Style: The eccentric side of London. Guy Hills’ inventive tweeds, David Saxby’s vintage and vintage-repro offerings, and Cordings’ unique outdoor clothes. Jesse also shows us the different ways you can tie a scarf.  


Elegance: For those who love Italian style, this is the first of two episodes on Milan. This episode has an interview with Luciano Barbera (arguably one of the best dressed men today), a visit to G. Lorenzi (arguably one of the best menswear stores in the world, although they’ve since closed up shop and become Cedes Milano), and a chat with Salvatore Battello, the elegant owner of W-D Man. Plus, Jesse goes over what color of shoes you can wear with what color suits (or trousers in general, really).


Consolidation: Big brands such as Gucci and Prada are increasingly taking over Milan’s fashion business, squeezing out some of the smaller operations. Jesse visits some of these smaller artisans and shops, including bespoke shoemaker Antonio Pio Mele and the beautiful boutique 10 Corso Como


Extras: Lastly, some extras, including my favorite of all PTO segments, a short feature on menswear writer Bruce Boyer. David Hill also asks some hard questions at New York’s Fashion Week, and our director Ben Harrison visits the FIT Museum’s exhibit on 1930s fashion.

Again, many thanks to our funders for their support! 

(Photo by Zac Wolf)

Fashion of the 1930s at the FIT Museum

Curator G. Bruce Boyer says that modern fashion began in the 1930s. His new exhibit, at the FIT Museum in New York, is “Elegance in an Age of Crisis: Fashions of the 1930s.” Director Ben Harrison talked with Boyer at the posh opening party for the exhibit, and the curator drew the line between the Victorian and Edwardian fashions that still prevailed through the 1920s, and the strikingly contemporary styles of just a decade later.

The exhibit features vintage examples, ranging from evening clothes to trench coats to Fred Astaire’s shoes. In the early 30s, America was tightening its belt, but contemporary style was just getting started.

The exhibition runs through April 19th at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York.

Put This On Season 2, Episode 6: Consolidation

Gucci Gucci Louis Louis Fendi Fendi Prada… what happens when a hundred artisans’ shops become a few global megacompanies? We went to Milan, Italy, to talk to small-scale makers who work in the shadow of fashion conglomerates like Prada. It’s one of our most ambitious episodes and the grand finale of our season.

Take Antonio Pio Mele, a cobbler who makes shoes by hand in a small shop in central Milan. He’s grateful that huge brands occasionally hire him to make samples, but he’s angry they rarely pay him on time and that their “bespoke” operations are rarely genuinely bespoke. Scholar Alex Pietrogiacomi provides some philosophical context, and photographer Simone Falcetta explains how consolidation has changed the fashion world.

We also talk to Milanese dandy Pino Pipoli, Dave Hill offers a rudiment about black suits, and the beautiful Valentina Galbiati gives us a guided tour of Milan’s most influential and beautiful boutique, 10 Corso Como.

—-
Watch it elsewhere:

Vimeo / Youtube / iTunes

—-

Buy Season One on DVD for $16

This episode was supported by our viewers.

—-

Executive Producers: Jesse Thorn & Adam Lisagor

Director: Benjamin Ahr Harrison

Host / Writer / Producer: Jesse Thorn

Rudiments: Dave Hill

Producer: Gianluca Migliarotti

Director of Photography: Daniele Vascelli

Sound: Daniele Belli

Editor: Brendan Ferrer

Subtitle Translation: Giovanni D’Amico

Put This On Season 2, Episode 6 Clothing Credits

Intro & Outro

Suit: High Society Tailor (Fabric by Molloy & Sons)
Tie: Saks 5th
Shirt: CEGO Custom Shirts
Pocket Square: Put This On

In Interviews

Suit: Vintage
Shirt: CEGO Custom Shirts
Tie: Vintage
Shoes: Alden
Pocket Square: Put This On

Elegance: Put This On Season Two, Episode Five

Put This On, a web series about dressing like a grownup, visits Milan, a world fashion capital.

In this episode, our director Benjamin Ahr Harrison visits Biella, north of the city, to talk with Luciano Barbera. Barbera isn’t just one of the world’s most elegant men, he’s also the leader of Carlo Barbera, one of the finest fabric mills in existence.

For our PTO Place segment, we talk with the owner of G. Lorenzi. It started as a cutlery shop, and has become a spectacular tribute to the finest small accessories imaginable. It’s home to a visually stunning spectrum of knives, scissors, shaving goods, toothbrushes, combs, shoehorns and other tiny necessities.

In PTO Man, we visit Salvatore Battello, the elegant owner of W-D Man. Before he started his line, he ran one of the last companies in the world that worked with shagreen - the beautiful skin of sharks and rays. Battello tells us about his passion for vintage fabric, and his definition of elegance.

Plus Jesse answers the question “what color shoes go with the suit?” and Dave Hill offers a rudiment on the topic of socks.

This is the fifth episode in our six-episode second season. In this season, we visit the three greatest men’s style cities in the world, as chosen by our readers - New York, Milan and London.

—-
Watch it elsewhere:

Vimeo / Youtube / iTunes

—-

Buy Season One on DVD for $16

This episode was supported by our viewers.


—-

Executive Producers: Jesse Thorn & Adam Lisagor

Director: Benjamin Ahr Harrison

Host / Writer / Producer: Jesse Thorn

Rudiments: Dave Hill

Producer: Gianluca Migliarotti

Director of Photography: Daniele Vascelli

Sound: Daniele Belli

Editor: Todd Thoenig and Benjamin Ahr Harrison

Subtitle Translation: Giovanni D’Amico

Put This On, Season 2 Episode 5 Clothing Credits

Watch S2E5 at PutThisOn.com, starting at 9AM Pacific, Noon Eastern!

Intro

Hat - Royal Stetson (Vintage)

Coat - Capper & Capper (Vintage)

Scarf - Johnston’s of Elgin

Gloves - Vintage (unlabeled)

At Carlo Barbera (on Ben Harrison)

Coat - RRL

Square - The Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Shirt -CEGO Custom Shirtmakers

Tie - Polo Ralph Lauren

In Q & Answer

Coat - Polo Ralph Lauren

Shirt - CEGO Custom Shirtmakers

Tie - Kilgour, French & Stanbury (Vintage)

Square - Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Put This On Season Two, Episode 4: Eccentric Style

Put This On, a web series about dressing like a grownup, visits London, where we visit with a few of the distinctive personalities that help make London a special place.

Guy Hills makes tweeds with the colors of the London streets- including reflective stripes for cyclists.

David Saxby went from being a vintage dealer to recreating traditional styles in his own factories with the workers who’d been laid off as clothing manufacture left England.

We visit Cordings, an unusual outdoor clothing store that Eric Clapton felt so strongly about he bought it.

And we learn a few ways to tie a scarf. Plus our sponsor, Mailchimp, and of course Rudiments with Dave Hill.

This is the fourth episode in our six-episode second season. In this season, we visit the three greatest men’s style cities in the world, as chosen by our readers - New York, Milan and London.

—-
Watch it elsewhere:

Vimeo / Youtube / iTunes


—-

Buy Season One on DVD for $16

This episode was supported by our viewers and by Mailchimp.


—-

Executive Producers: Jesse Thorn & Adam Lisagor

Director: Benjamin Ahr Harrison

Host / Writer / Producer: Jesse Thorn

Rudiments: Dave Hill

Producer: Kristian Brodie

Director of Photography: Charlie Cook

Sound: Kristian Brodie

Put This On Season Two, Episode 3: (New) Traditions

Put This On, a web series about dressing like a grownup, visits London, where we examine how traditions are being reinvented in the birthplace of classic menswear.

We go to Savile Row, where we meet up with a historical guide to talk about the history of the world’s oldest tailoring street. We also chat with the tailor Richard Anderson about what’s special about The Row. Patrick Grant, the owner and designer of Norton & Sons, talks about how Savile Row can become a vital part of the international fashion world again.

Just off Savile Row, we go to the basement showroom of W. Bill, the world’s most legendary tweed merchant. Ray Hammet, who’s worked at W. Bill for decades, shows us around the stacks of wooly majesty.

In our PTO: Man segment, we talk with Ian Bruce, painter and member of the band The Correspondents, about re-imagining the SoHo dandy for the 21st century. He takes us through London’s red light district, and tells us why he doesn’t want to look like a painter at the end of a long day of painting.

We visit the tie factory owned and operated by Drake’s of London to learn how a high-quality tie is made, from fabric to finished product. Then we buy one to send to a supporter of the show.

Plus Dave Hill tells where sport sunglasses are and are not appropriate, in Rudiments.

This is the third episode in our six-episode second season. In this season, we visit the three greatest men’s style cities in the world, as chosen by our readers - New York, Milan and London.

—-
Watch it elsewhere:

Vimeo / Youtube / iTunes


—-

Buy Season One on DVD for $16

This episode was supported by our viewers and by The Put This On Gentlemen’s Association.


—-

Executive Producers: Jesse Thorn & Adam Lisagor

Director: Benjamin Ahr Harrison

Host / Writer / Producer: Jesse Thorn

Rudiments: Dave Hill

Producer: Kristian Brodie

Director of Photography: Charlie Cook

Sound: Kristian Brodie

Put This On Season 2 Episode 2: Thrifting with Street Etiquette

Put This On host Jesse Thorn goes thrift store shopping for menswear with Joshua Kissi and Travis Gumbs, the proprietors of Street Etiquette in Manhattan. They share thrifting tips, including altering thrift store finds and “the pinch test” for determining whether a jacket is canvassed.

From Season 2, Episode 2 of Put This On

Season 2, Episode 2: PTO Place: Jay Kos

From Put This On Season 2, Episode 2, a profile of New York menswear retailer Jay Kos. Kos is known for mixing traditional style with bold fabrics and colors, and is a favorite of contemporary dandies like Fonzworth Bentley.

From Season 2, Episode 2 of Put This On