Boxers, Briefs, or Coil Spacers and a Restraint Layer?
Alyssa Shaw visits the Smithsonian’s Suited for Space exhibition, currently in Philadelphia, and considers the evolution of astronaut undies: 

On display in the quirky exhibition are a few different models of spacesuit underwear, including a beige cotton one-piece with coil spacers affixed strategically to allow airflow…. A sketch from 1965 shows the Gemini EV spacesuit with its many layers, the first of which labeled “underwear,” others including “comfort layer,” “pressure bladder,” and “restraint layer.” In the late 1960s, Atlas Underwear Corporations designed the Apollo 11 “biobelt,” a soft layer worn against astronaut’s skin designed to monitor things like blood pressure, but not necessarily designed with the wearer’s comfort in mind. Commander Chris Conrad of the Apollo 12 mission wasn’t a fan of the biobelt. He mused, “It looks like I’ve got poison ivy under these things.”
Space underwear have come a long way since their first use fifty years ago. They still resemble those one-piece men’s pajamas your great-grandfather probably wore, but today’s technology replaces elements like coil spacers. Some of the most recent underlayers are composed of stretchy material that provides the flexibility astronauts need when navigating and working in space. They are typically fitted with cooling tubes and sweat-wicking fabric to keep their body temperatures at a nice medium between the coldness of space and the heat pent up in their tight suits.

It’s July and I’ve already shed all the layers of clothing basic decency and the law allow. Who’s down for some cooling tube underwear? Via Andrew Sullivan.
-Pete

Boxers, Briefs, or Coil Spacers and a Restraint Layer?

Alyssa Shaw visits the Smithsonian’s Suited for Space exhibition, currently in Philadelphia, and considers the evolution of astronaut undies:

On display in the quirky exhibition are a few different models of spacesuit underwear, including a beige cotton one-piece with coil spacers affixed strategically to allow airflow…. A sketch from 1965 shows the Gemini EV spacesuit with its many layers, the first of which labeled “underwear,” others including “comfort layer,” “pressure bladder,” and “restraint layer.” In the late 1960s, Atlas Underwear Corporations designed the Apollo 11 “biobelt,” a soft layer worn against astronaut’s skin designed to monitor things like blood pressure, but not necessarily designed with the wearer’s comfort in mind. Commander Chris Conrad of the Apollo 12 mission wasn’t a fan of the biobelt. He mused, “It looks like I’ve got poison ivy under these things.”

Space underwear have come a long way since their first use fifty years ago. They still resemble those one-piece men’s pajamas your great-grandfather probably wore, but today’s technology replaces elements like coil spacers. Some of the most recent underlayers are composed of stretchy material that provides the flexibility astronauts need when navigating and working in space. They are typically fitted with cooling tubes and sweat-wicking fabric to keep their body temperatures at a nice medium between the coldness of space and the heat pent up in their tight suits.

It’s July and I’ve already shed all the layers of clothing basic decency and the law allow. Who’s down for some cooling tube underwear? Via Andrew Sullivan.

-Pete

From The New Yorker's Photo Booth blog:

March 16, 1960. This suit built by the Republic Aviation Corporation solved the problem of what “the well-dressed man” would “wear for a stroll over the airless moonscape.” An article in the New York Times promised that the outfit would have its own oxygen supply and that its tripod legs would “enable its wearer to rest by sitting on a perch inside.” The wrench hands were presumably for securing loose screws.

From The New Yorker's Photo Booth blog:

March 16, 1960. This suit built by the Republic Aviation Corporation solved the problem of what “the well-dressed man” would “wear for a stroll over the airless moonscape.” An article in the New York Times promised that the outfit would have its own oxygen supply and that its tripod legs would “enable its wearer to rest by sitting on a perch inside.” The wrench hands were presumably for securing loose screws.

The history of the Fisher Space Pen at the Smithsonian’s Design Decoded blog.
"NASA’s Most Excellent Outfits" in Life

A suit designed for the Reduced Gravity Walking Simulator located at the  Lunar Landing Facility. The purpose of this simulator was to study the  subject while walking, jumping, or running. Researchers conducted  studies of various factors such as fatigue limit, energy expenditure,  and speed of locomotion.

(via BB)

"NASA’s Most Excellent Outfits" in Life

A suit designed for the Reduced Gravity Walking Simulator located at the Lunar Landing Facility. The purpose of this simulator was to study the subject while walking, jumping, or running. Researchers conducted studies of various factors such as fatigue limit, energy expenditure, and speed of locomotion.

(via BB)

It’s On Ebay!
Sweet Russian Spaceship Watch
Starts at $49, Ends Monday

It’s On Ebay!

Sweet Russian Spaceship Watch

Starts at $49, Ends Monday