I really enjoyed reading on Uni-Watch about Cleveland Indians diehards who’ve removed the ethnic caricature Chief Wahoo from their Indians gear. Some remove it perfectly, some leave the evidence of the removal behind - a sort of ghost. It reminds me of the silhouettes of slave life incorporated into the now-closed National Slavery Museum. Just as folks who acknowledge the legacy of slavery don’t love their homes any less, these folks still love their team, even if they don’t love this grotesque symbol.
Certainly a lesson about the power of clothing.

I really enjoyed reading on Uni-Watch about Cleveland Indians diehards who’ve removed the ethnic caricature Chief Wahoo from their Indians gear. Some remove it perfectly, some leave the evidence of the removal behind - a sort of ghost. It reminds me of the silhouettes of slave life incorporated into the now-closed National Slavery Museum. Just as folks who acknowledge the legacy of slavery don’t love their homes any less, these folks still love their team, even if they don’t love this grotesque symbol.

Certainly a lesson about the power of clothing.

Community star Danny Pudi directed this fascinating ESPN short about Marquette University’s basketball unconventional basketball uniforms. It’s called “Untucked,” in honor of the jersey you see above - which was designed to be worn outside of the trunks. Designed, in fact, by one of Marquette’s players, an art major named Bo Ellis. It’s a great look not just at sports uniforms, but at the relationship between clothing and culture.

Community star Danny Pudi directed this fascinating ESPN short about Marquette University’s basketball unconventional basketball uniforms. It’s called “Untucked,” in honor of the jersey you see above - which was designed to be worn outside of the trunks. Designed, in fact, by one of Marquette’s players, an art major named Bo Ellis. It’s a great look not just at sports uniforms, but at the relationship between clothing and culture.

Word of the Day: Buksekrise
Remember the Norwegian men’s Olympic curling team? The guys who prefer go-to-hell pants? They encountered a Buksekrise (trouser crisis) after being forced into a tiebreak match with Great Britain today, a match they didn’t account for in their wardrobe planning. Each team member brought nine pairs of pants (the hubris!) and in their tenth match were forced into repeated wearing of their most abstract expressionist pair. Alas, the Brits, who dress like they’re working the concession stand, won the day, eliminating fancy pants from this year’s Olympics.
-Pete

Word of the Day: Buksekrise

Remember the Norwegian men’s Olympic curling team? The guys who prefer go-to-hell pants? They encountered a Buksekrise (trouser crisis) after being forced into a tiebreak match with Great Britain today, a match they didn’t account for in their wardrobe planning. Each team member brought nine pairs of pants (the hubris!) and in their tenth match were forced into repeated wearing of their most abstract expressionist pair. Alas, the Brits, who dress like they’re working the concession stand, won the day, eliminating fancy pants from this year’s Olympics.

-Pete

Maybe overreacting to the controversy about the brand’s made-in-China 2012 Olympic uniforms, Ralph Lauren and co. went all YOU-ESS-AY YOU-ESS-AY YOU-ESS-AY on this year’s models. This shawl collar sweater will be worn for the opening ceremonies (it’s made, indeed, in USA) and is available to non-athletes for $595. WAIT A MINUTE, I ONLY COUNT 45 STARS. I bet one of the stars left out was the one for my home state. 
-Pete

Maybe overreacting to the controversy about the brand’s made-in-China 2012 Olympic uniforms, Ralph Lauren and co. went all YOU-ESS-AY YOU-ESS-AY YOU-ESS-AY on this year’s models. This shawl collar sweater will be worn for the opening ceremonies (it’s made, indeed, in USA) and is available to non-athletes for $595. WAIT A MINUTE, I ONLY COUNT 45 STARS. I bet one of the stars left out was the one for my home state.

-Pete

The Norweigan curling team will be wearing crazy outfits again this year. Which is cute, I guess. What’s not cute? Those three-inch-too-long pants. Hem ‘em, boys.
(In all sincerity, it points to a good rule: if you’re going to do something ridiculous, do it right. Poor taste requires unimpeachably excellent taste.)

The Norweigan curling team will be wearing crazy outfits again this year. Which is cute, I guess. What’s not cute? Those three-inch-too-long pants. Hem ‘em, boys.

(In all sincerity, it points to a good rule: if you’re going to do something ridiculous, do it right. Poor taste requires unimpeachably excellent taste.)

Jim Harbaugh’s $8 Pleated Khakis
I’m from San Francisco, and I’ve really enjoyed following the 49ers remarkable run this year. Unlike most teams, you can have almost as much fun watching Jim Harbaugh, the Niners’ head coach, as the action on the field. A former player himself, he leaps and runs and screams and yells. He even switched a few weeks ago from street shoes to cleats, so he could get better purchase as he sprinted down the sideline, following the action. All of this, if you’re a fan of the 49ers, is delightful.
But if you’re a fan of menswear, there’s something less delightful: his pleated khakis. Harbaugh tends to layer his tops - a polo and a long sleeve shirt and a sweatshirt and whatever else he can grab. Underneath are khakis so spectacularly anti-style, they seem like something a Vice Magazine’s “Dos & Dont’s” segment would give a “Do” to just to get a rise out of people.
Of course, NFL coaches have to follow strict clothing guidelines. When the 49ers last coach, Mike Nolan, wanted to wear a suit to honor his father (also an NFL coach - back when they wore suits), he was fined by the league for violating dress code, which required only Reebok clothing. He eventually managed an accommodation with the league, and wore Joseph Abboud.
But back to Harbaugh: it turns out, according to a radio interview with his wife, that not only does the former QB wear pleated khakis, he wears eight dollar pleated khakis from Wal-Mart. And he’s so committed to them that after she threw some away, he found a Wal-Mart (not easy in San Francisco) and bought more.
Harbaugh says everything will stay the same while the Niners continue their playoff run, but he might consider a change in the offseason. Jim - if you need a consultant, we’re available.
(Thanks, Dean!)

Jim Harbaugh’s $8 Pleated Khakis

I’m from San Francisco, and I’ve really enjoyed following the 49ers remarkable run this year. Unlike most teams, you can have almost as much fun watching Jim Harbaugh, the Niners’ head coach, as the action on the field. A former player himself, he leaps and runs and screams and yells. He even switched a few weeks ago from street shoes to cleats, so he could get better purchase as he sprinted down the sideline, following the action. All of this, if you’re a fan of the 49ers, is delightful.

But if you’re a fan of menswear, there’s something less delightful: his pleated khakis. Harbaugh tends to layer his tops - a polo and a long sleeve shirt and a sweatshirt and whatever else he can grab. Underneath are khakis so spectacularly anti-style, they seem like something a Vice Magazine’s “Dos & Dont’s” segment would give a “Do” to just to get a rise out of people.

Of course, NFL coaches have to follow strict clothing guidelines. When the 49ers last coach, Mike Nolan, wanted to wear a suit to honor his father (also an NFL coach - back when they wore suits), he was fined by the league for violating dress code, which required only Reebok clothing. He eventually managed an accommodation with the league, and wore Joseph Abboud.

But back to Harbaugh: it turns out, according to a radio interview with his wife, that not only does the former QB wear pleated khakis, he wears eight dollar pleated khakis from Wal-Mart. And he’s so committed to them that after she threw some away, he found a Wal-Mart (not easy in San Francisco) and bought more.

Harbaugh says everything will stay the same while the Niners continue their playoff run, but he might consider a change in the offseason. Jim - if you need a consultant, we’re available.

(Thanks, Dean!)

The amazing sports uniform blog Uni Watch has a great set of scans from a 1965 varsity jacket catalog. (In high school, I lettered in cutting class to go get salami sandwiches.)

Chief Wahoo, Indians and Rooting For Outfits
Remember the old Seinfeld bit? When you pick a favorite sports team, the players change, the ownership changes… ultimately you’re just rooting for outfits. I’m a sports fan, and I of course care a lot about outfits, so I find myself thinking about sports uniforms a lot. Ask me about baseball stirrups sometime. You’ll get an earful.
Lately, the big news in the sports uniform world has been the controversy over Native American-themed mascots, team names and logos. There’s been a lot of bad news coming out of Washington, where the team name is an outmoded term that in 2013 can only be considered a slur. In Cleveland, though, there’s some good news.
For decades, there’s been debate in Cleveland, in the Cleveland Indians organization and in the larger sports world over the team’s “Chief Wahoo” logo. I won’t link to it here, but you probably know it - it’s a cartoon drawn in 1951 of a grinning Indian brave, with bright red skin and a fat, bulbous nose. It looks like an animated image of Hirohito from WWII or a black person in some 1930s cartoon short. Outside of its familiar context, it’s really pretty shocking. But after sixty years of using it in one form or another, many Indians fans are understandably attached to it.
The team removed the image from its caps in stages over the last few years, and as SportsLogos.net is reporting, they seem to be in the final stages of eliminating it from their identity completely. It’s something I wish had happened a few decades ago, but I nonetheless tip my (Chief Wahoo-less) cap to the team for handling a situation that frankly needed to be handled. Doing it without fanfare is entirely reasonable and genuinely decent.
Should the team change its name completely? I think that’s a thornier issue. Unlike “Redskin,” Indian (and particularly American Indian) is a term chosen by many in the Native American community. Members of the American Indian Movement have fought and died for it. There are millions of people who claim Native identity in the US, and their preferred name is a spectrum - many prefer to be identified by their nation, for example - but we can probably stipulate that Indian isn’t a slur. Whether it’s an appropriate name for a sports team? That’s a very reasonable question.
Here is some important context: American Indians aren’t a historical peoples, and they’re not mythical, either. They live here in America with us, any reasonable measure shows they’ve got it tougher than almost any other demographic group.
The overwhelming majority of mascots are mythical or historical (49ers, Wizards) animals (Hawks), or more abstract (Sonics). Do you think a real group of people is comparable to, say, Bobcats? Do you think it’s fair for a group of people historically stereotyped as savage and violent to object to being admired solely for their courage in battle? Powerful people who aren’t Indians have defined the idea of Indian-ness in the American consciousness for hundreds of years. That’s a tough spot to be in if you’re the one being defined.
Let me say this: I’m sure that the folks who say Indian nicknames are intended to be positive are sincere. It’s just that that’s not the whole issue. One of the great fights American Indians face in contemporary America is defining themselves as a living people, rather than historical-mythical characters. Being a mascot is essentially the opposite of being human. It’s about creating a narrow, broad-strokes identity. That’s the whole point of a team identity. It’s pretty much either fun or badass.
Are there ways to genuinely honor people through sports teams? One would hope that teams with Native-inspired names would at the bare minimum actively engage Native communities, so those communities have a real voice in they way they’re represented and can take real pride in the teams. Florida State, whose team is called the Seminoles, has taken steps in this direction. There’s also another alternative: just pick a name that won’t be hurtful to a real and significant group of people. That’d work, too.
But anyway, back to uniforms, because uniform-wise, there’s great news for Cleveland fans. The new caps, which have a few variations, are handsome as all hell. They’ll need to be integrated better into the uniform identity system, which is very “Baseball Script” heavy, but if you’re looking for a cap to wear out and about, you could really do a lot worse. One of the best new cap styles in recent years. And truly: I tip it in the direction of Cleveland.

Chief Wahoo, Indians and Rooting For Outfits

Remember the old Seinfeld bit? When you pick a favorite sports team, the players change, the ownership changes… ultimately you’re just rooting for outfits. I’m a sports fan, and I of course care a lot about outfits, so I find myself thinking about sports uniforms a lot. Ask me about baseball stirrups sometime. You’ll get an earful.

Lately, the big news in the sports uniform world has been the controversy over Native American-themed mascots, team names and logos. There’s been a lot of bad news coming out of Washington, where the team name is an outmoded term that in 2013 can only be considered a slur. In Cleveland, though, there’s some good news.

For decades, there’s been debate in Cleveland, in the Cleveland Indians organization and in the larger sports world over the team’s “Chief Wahoo” logo. I won’t link to it here, but you probably know it - it’s a cartoon drawn in 1951 of a grinning Indian brave, with bright red skin and a fat, bulbous nose. It looks like an animated image of Hirohito from WWII or a black person in some 1930s cartoon short. Outside of its familiar context, it’s really pretty shocking. But after sixty years of using it in one form or another, many Indians fans are understandably attached to it.

The team removed the image from its caps in stages over the last few years, and as SportsLogos.net is reporting, they seem to be in the final stages of eliminating it from their identity completely. It’s something I wish had happened a few decades ago, but I nonetheless tip my (Chief Wahoo-less) cap to the team for handling a situation that frankly needed to be handled. Doing it without fanfare is entirely reasonable and genuinely decent.

Should the team change its name completely? I think that’s a thornier issue. Unlike “Redskin,” Indian (and particularly American Indian) is a term chosen by many in the Native American community. Members of the American Indian Movement have fought and died for it. There are millions of people who claim Native identity in the US, and their preferred name is a spectrum - many prefer to be identified by their nation, for example - but we can probably stipulate that Indian isn’t a slur. Whether it’s an appropriate name for a sports team? That’s a very reasonable question.

Here is some important context: American Indians aren’t a historical peoples, and they’re not mythical, either. They live here in America with us, any reasonable measure shows they’ve got it tougher than almost any other demographic group.

The overwhelming majority of mascots are mythical or historical (49ers, Wizards) animals (Hawks), or more abstract (Sonics). Do you think a real group of people is comparable to, say, Bobcats? Do you think it’s fair for a group of people historically stereotyped as savage and violent to object to being admired solely for their courage in battle? Powerful people who aren’t Indians have defined the idea of Indian-ness in the American consciousness for hundreds of years. That’s a tough spot to be in if you’re the one being defined.

Let me say this: I’m sure that the folks who say Indian nicknames are intended to be positive are sincere. It’s just that that’s not the whole issue. One of the great fights American Indians face in contemporary America is defining themselves as a living people, rather than historical-mythical characters. Being a mascot is essentially the opposite of being human. It’s about creating a narrow, broad-strokes identity. That’s the whole point of a team identity. It’s pretty much either fun or badass.

Are there ways to genuinely honor people through sports teams? One would hope that teams with Native-inspired names would at the bare minimum actively engage Native communities, so those communities have a real voice in they way they’re represented and can take real pride in the teams. Florida State, whose team is called the Seminoles, has taken steps in this direction. There’s also another alternative: just pick a name that won’t be hurtful to a real and significant group of people. That’d work, too.

But anyway, back to uniforms, because uniform-wise, there’s great news for Cleveland fans. The new caps, which have a few variations, are handsome as all hell. They’ll need to be integrated better into the uniform identity system, which is very “Baseball Script” heavy, but if you’re looking for a cap to wear out and about, you could really do a lot worse. One of the best new cap styles in recent years. And truly: I tip it in the direction of Cleveland.

(Source: jessethorn)

Jordan Peele of Key & Peele nails NBA style in the brilliant, hilarious “You Can Fly!” sketch.

Jordan Peele of Key & Peele nails NBA style in the brilliant, hilarious “You Can Fly!” sketch.