A Coat for the Meanest of Winters
Again, I’m not much of a reblogger, but it’s hard to not reblog a photo of such a wonderful garment. This is what’s known as a “Guards coat,” which is a style of overcoat that takes its name from what English Officers of the Guard used to wear. It’s a “city” coat, which means it’s slightly orientated towards business, rather than leisure. Back in the day, men of a certain class used to have their wardrobes cleaved in half - so there was one part of their wardrobe meant to be worn in the city, and another to be worn in the country. This was meant for the first. 
A traditional Guards coat is made with peak lapels, a double breasted 6x3 button front, welted pockets, and a half belt at the back. You can see versions of it here on Prince Charles and King George VI.
Vox’s coat was made for him by Steed, a small bespoke tailoring house in England that specializes in the “London drape cut.” That essentially means a soft shoulder and slightly fuller chest and upper back. You can kind of see that effect here, although it’s subtle. The cloth is a heavy, heavy, 36oz dark blue cashmere from The London Lounge’s Cloth Club. That’s basically a heavy enough cashmere to keep you warm in Antarctica. 
(Photo via voxsart)

A Coat for the Meanest of Winters

Again, I’m not much of a reblogger, but it’s hard to not reblog a photo of such a wonderful garment. This is what’s known as a “Guards coat,” which is a style of overcoat that takes its name from what English Officers of the Guard used to wear. It’s a “city” coat, which means it’s slightly orientated towards business, rather than leisure. Back in the day, men of a certain class used to have their wardrobes cleaved in half - so there was one part of their wardrobe meant to be worn in the city, and another to be worn in the country. This was meant for the first. 

A traditional Guards coat is made with peak lapels, a double breasted 6x3 button front, welted pockets, and a half belt at the back. You can see versions of it here on Prince Charles and King George VI.

Vox’s coat was made for him by Steed, a small bespoke tailoring house in England that specializes in the “London drape cut.” That essentially means a soft shoulder and slightly fuller chest and upper back. You can kind of see that effect here, although it’s subtle. The cloth is a heavy, heavy, 36oz dark blue cashmere from The London Lounge’s Cloth Club. That’s basically a heavy enough cashmere to keep you warm in Antarctica. 

(Photo via voxsart)

Mister Crew found a strange comic this morning as he was trying to find online photos of Steed jackets (Steed being a bespoke tailor in the UK - a tailor that I use, but is worn much more famously by Voxsartoria). 

In case you can’t read the conversation:

Cybernaut: “I need complete freedom of motion, especially in the arms.”

Tailor: “It’s what we’re known for, sir. Our signature cut of a small armhole and a big sleeve is very, very comfortable.”

Cybernaut: “I haven’t got nerves. Comfort is not my concern. It’s movement. I can’t need a new suit every time I break down a door.”

Tailor: “The cut worked out for Fred Astaire, sir. I’m confident it will present no problems.”

(Next page) Cybernaut: “You mind?” *whacks table* “Hm, you’re right. I felt no resistance whatsoever. And the jacket is still in fine shape.”

Tailor: “Of course, sir.”

Cybernaut: “You know, when we’re finished here I’d like to go ahead and select fabric for a couple more just like it.”

Tailor: “My pleasure.”

Strangely, the cybernaut seems to not be the only one who poses like a robot when wearing Steed. 

A Handsome Collection of Fall and Winter Jackets
Following my post on David, I thought I’d quickly show off part of his sport coat and suit collection. All the pieces you see above were made from the London Lounge’s Cloth Club fabrics. The London Lounge is an online forum, mostly made up of bespoke tailoring aficionados, and they have a “cloth club” run by Michael Alden. Michael comes up with cloth ideas, sometimes partly informed by the suggestions of Cloth Club members, and designs are submitted for voting and pre-order. I think the fabrics are exquisite and beautifully designed, and David’s collection is one to be admired. You can click on the image to expand it and see all the detail. 
All pieces above were made by Steed, except for the corn Shetland on the far right and the light blue windowpane, which were made by Peter Lee in Hong Kong. To learn more about the Cloth Club, you read this article at The Financial Times.

A Handsome Collection of Fall and Winter Jackets

Following my post on David, I thought I’d quickly show off part of his sport coat and suit collection. All the pieces you see above were made from the London Lounge’s Cloth Club fabrics. The London Lounge is an online forum, mostly made up of bespoke tailoring aficionados, and they have a “cloth club” run by Michael Alden. Michael comes up with cloth ideas, sometimes partly informed by the suggestions of Cloth Club members, and designs are submitted for voting and pre-order. I think the fabrics are exquisite and beautifully designed, and David’s collection is one to be admired. You can click on the image to expand it and see all the detail. 

All pieces above were made by Steed, except for the corn Shetland on the far right and the light blue windowpane, which were made by Peter Lee in Hong Kong. To learn more about the Cloth Club, you read this article at The Financial Times.

Steed Bespoke Tailors Coming to San Francisco, April 13th

As some readers may know, I’ve been trying to persuade Steed Bespoke Tailors to come out to San Francisco for over six months now. Well a few weeks ago, they finally booked their first ticket, and are scheduled to arrive on Saturday, April 13th, and then depart Tuesday, April 16th

A little background on Steed and why this announcement is so special: Steed was founded in 1995 by tailors Edwin DeBoise and Thomas Mahon, who at the time worked as cutters at Savile Row’s Anderson & Sheppard. Thomas has since moved on to start his own firm in Cumbria, but Edwin continues at Steed. Before working at Anderson & Sheppard, Edwin received his training at the London College of Fashion and worked under the legendary Edward Sexton. His tailoring style is very much informed by these experiences, and in my opinion, he currently makes some of the most beautiful garments in the world of classic men’s tailoring.

Now, bespoke garments are expensive, and certainly not for everyone. However, if you have the money and are looking for something special (perhaps for a wedding or new job), this is a great opportunity. Steed cuts a unique style known as the London drape cut. Oversimplified, it’s designed with a fuller, more sculpted chest that makes the wearer look masculine, muscular, and comfortably relaxed. You can see this in the photos above, but if it’s not obvious, check out a post I wrote here, which highlights this silhouette a bit more clearly. In addition to the signature chest, Steed’s cuts a soft, unpadded shoulder, slightly nipped waist, and high armholes. The effect is something very comfortable, and very stylish.

This being bespoke, you can ask for your commissions to be made in any way you want, but you’ll want to stick to their general house style (meaning, the soft shoulders and shaped chest). When choosing a bespoke tailor, it’s always wise to stay within the style they specialize in, and ask for little tweaks here and there, rather than request something dramatically different. 

It’s my hope to drum up enough interest in the Bay Area to keep Steed coming back. This is partly for my own selfish reasons, since I hope to use them on a regular basis, but I also think this is a rather special opportunity for people who live in this area. They’re less expensive than many of the Savile Row tailors who visit, and I think they cut a very unique and beautiful silhouette. Since Put This On has a rather big audience, I’m happy to help answer any basic questions if you email me, but will refer you to Steed for anything complex (I just don’t want them to receive a hundred emails in the middle of their workday). For booking appointments, however, you should just directly contact Steed.   

(Pictured above: two of Steed’s clients looking fantastic in their commissions)

So, this is pretty fantastic, right?  Our contributor prefers to remain anonymous, but he looks pretty spectacular in this suit.  The distance shot gives you a great sense of the fit on his suit, which is by Steed, and is contemporary without being silly.  The close up shows the wonderful colors.  Man, that flannel is beautiful, isn’t it?  And what’s nice, to my eye, is the way the patch pockets and soft fabric make a suit and square and so on seem almost casual.  Elegant, even.