David Rees is one of the most fascinating men I know. He led a truly epic all-night party a few years ago at MaxFunCon East that people still tell me about. He created the iconic clip-art comic strip Get Your War On. He’s the world’s preeminent artisinal pencil sharpener. He’s hilarious, unique and insightful. And now, some poor sap has given David his own TV show.

"Going Deep with David Rees" is a deep dive into one topic per episode, and it premiers tonight at ten on NatGeo. The first episode is about digging a hole. The second is about tying your shoes.

I thought I’d created the definitive shoe-tying video, but it turns out David’s got me beat by a factor of ten. Above is a bit of his investigation of knots with a real sailor. Here he tests shoelaces with an outdoorsy guy.

Tune in tonight at ten. You’ll laugh, you’ll laugh more, you’ll learn, and you’ll wonder how David Rees got his own TV show.

Once in a while, I bring something from my public radio show Bullseye over here. Sometimes it’s because it’s related to menswear. Sometimes it’s just because I really like it. This is the latter.

Tony Hale played Buster Bluth on Arrested Development (and will play him again, as Netflix has revived the show), and he’s brilliant on the wonderful new HBO show Veep. I talked to him about being the Vice President’s “Body Man,” about how his faith intersects with his career as an artist, and of course about Buster.

The interview’s on Soundcloud here. You can hear the whole episode here, or get it (or subscribe!) free in iTunes with this link.

A wonderful analysis of one of the great television comedies of all time, The Dick Van Dyke Show. Not only is it fascinating, it also features some great early-60s style and two very funny scenes set in a haberdashery.

John Galliano’s brother defends his remarks, from Conan.

How to Dress for TV
I’ve been doing some TV work lately, and I dress myself for camera, so I’ve had to familiarize myself with the basics of dressing for television.  The rules are less strict than they used to be, thanks to improved camera and display technology, but they still apply.  Here are the basics, if you find yourself having to dress for the camera.
Avoid small patterns.  This especially applies to narrow stripes or fine checks.  These can distort on camera, especially when compressed for digital.  This is especially true for larger fields like shirts and jackets.
Avoid white shirts.  White shirts can glare under bright studio lights, which camera guys hate.  Go with blue instead.
Favor fabrics with a soft finish.  Hard worsted wools (even fine ones) can look shiny and cheap under ultra-bright light.  Flannel is a great choice for this reason.
Favor dark solids.  Navy blue or charcoal gray will always look good.
Avoid logos.  They’ll likely make you cover them up, whatever they are.  They’ll even use some felt and gummy stuff to cover up a Lacoste alligator.
If you’re using a green screen, avoid green.  Otherwise you’ll turn into the semi-invisible man.
Do your ironing.  Under bright lights, small wrinkles can look big and scary.
When in doubt, bring a backup.  Check with the camera operator and director or producer that something is reading well on the monitor.

How to Dress for TV

I’ve been doing some TV work lately, and I dress myself for camera, so I’ve had to familiarize myself with the basics of dressing for television.  The rules are less strict than they used to be, thanks to improved camera and display technology, but they still apply.  Here are the basics, if you find yourself having to dress for the camera.

  • Avoid small patterns.  This especially applies to narrow stripes or fine checks.  These can distort on camera, especially when compressed for digital.  This is especially true for larger fields like shirts and jackets.
  • Avoid white shirts.  White shirts can glare under bright studio lights, which camera guys hate.  Go with blue instead.
  • Favor fabrics with a soft finish.  Hard worsted wools (even fine ones) can look shiny and cheap under ultra-bright light.  Flannel is a great choice for this reason.
  • Favor dark solids.  Navy blue or charcoal gray will always look good.
  • Avoid logos.  They’ll likely make you cover them up, whatever they are.  They’ll even use some felt and gummy stuff to cover up a Lacoste alligator.
  • If you’re using a green screen, avoid green.  Otherwise you’ll turn into the semi-invisible man.
  • Do your ironing.  Under bright lights, small wrinkles can look big and scary.
  • When in doubt, bring a backup.  Check with the camera operator and director or producer that something is reading well on the monitor.

Kenny Powers bringing the fucking fashion INSIGHTS.

(Thanks, James)

If you want to see a nightly lesson in how a suit should fit, watch The Late Show with David Letterman.
Now - I’m hardly an unbiased observer.  Letterman is, in my book, The Greatest American.  The fact, however, remains, that Letterman’s suits are consistently beautiful. 
When Letterman held down the Late Night slot on NBC, he dressed pretty casually.  He was often seen in a baseball jacket, or an oxford shirt.  He often went no further than a blazer and rep tie.  He was relaxed and his only style was a rejection of the previous late-night-host expectations.
When he moved to CBS, however, he reset his style.  He understood that he was upholding a tradition exemplified by his hero, Johnny Carson, and that a gracious late night host wore a suit.
I don’t know who makes Letterman’s suits, but they are consistently impeccable.  I’m not always crazy about the shiny, high-thread-count wools he chooses (particularly on camera), or the all pinstripes.  They always, however, fit.
Of course, Letterman’s style isn’t perfect.  He invariably wears a white shirt, which does his complexion (and his cameramen) no favors.  He has an annoying habit of leaving his jacket open while standing - even on double-breasted coats - which makes him look slovenly and out-of-shape.  (This couldn’t be further from the truth, by the way - he’s a strapping, athletic guy.)  Worst of all, he insists on wearing loafers with his suits… and (ick) white socks.  That’s charming with chinos in Take Ivy, but untenable on network TV. 
Still… those suits.  Perfect.  Also: Letterman: greatest ever.
BREAKING: Rob informs me that Letterman’s suits are made in New York by Leonard Logsdail.

If you want to see a nightly lesson in how a suit should fit, watch The Late Show with David Letterman.

Now - I’m hardly an unbiased observer.  Letterman is, in my book, The Greatest American.  The fact, however, remains, that Letterman’s suits are consistently beautiful. 

When Letterman held down the Late Night slot on NBC, he dressed pretty casually.  He was often seen in a baseball jacket, or an oxford shirt.  He often went no further than a blazer and rep tie.  He was relaxed and his only style was a rejection of the previous late-night-host expectations.

When he moved to CBS, however, he reset his style.  He understood that he was upholding a tradition exemplified by his hero, Johnny Carson, and that a gracious late night host wore a suit.

I don’t know who makes Letterman’s suits, but they are consistently impeccable.  I’m not always crazy about the shiny, high-thread-count wools he chooses (particularly on camera), or the all pinstripes.  They always, however, fit.

Of course, Letterman’s style isn’t perfect.  He invariably wears a white shirt, which does his complexion (and his cameramen) no favors.  He has an annoying habit of leaving his jacket open while standing - even on double-breasted coats - which makes him look slovenly and out-of-shape.  (This couldn’t be further from the truth, by the way - he’s a strapping, athletic guy.)  Worst of all, he insists on wearing loafers with his suits… and (ick) white socks.  That’s charming with chinos in Take Ivy, but untenable on network TV. 

Still… those suits.  Perfect.  Also: Letterman: greatest ever.

BREAKING: Rob informs me that Letterman’s suits are made in New York by Leonard Logsdail.

"By the way, Jeff, I think your shirt’s trying to get out of your pants."- Style icon Pierce Hawthorne to style icon Jeff Winger on NBC’s Community s1e09
Here, Jeff takes the Burberry classic house check pattern (also known as haymarket check) to extremes in matching shirt ($200 at my-wardrobe.com) and socks (It’s on Ebay! for $35) and Pierce, style icon to dads everywhere, mocks him for it.
Because Burberry’s trademarked iconic pattern is so often knocked off, here’s how to spot a fake. From the looks of it, formerly well-to-do Jeff sports the real deal.
Put This On fully supports the watching of this show.
"By the way, Jeff, I think your shirt’s trying to get out of your pants."
- Style icon Pierce Hawthorne to style icon Jeff Winger on NBC’s Community s1e09

Here, Jeff takes the Burberry classic house check pattern (also known as haymarket check) to extremes in matching shirt ($200 at my-wardrobe.com) and socks (It’s on Ebay! for $35) and Pierce, style icon to dads everywhere, mocks him for it.

Because Burberry’s trademarked iconic pattern is so often knocked off, here’s how to spot a fake. From the looks of it, formerly well-to-do Jeff sports the real deal.

Put This On fully supports the watching of this show.

Greg Behrendt is one of our favorite standup comedians.  He’s also the only standup comedian of whom we are aware with a tattoo that says “Dress Better.”  His new special, “Greg Behrendt is That Guy From That Thing,” premiers tonight at midnight (11 central) on Comedy Central.  You can order it on DVD from Amazon for $8.49 - it comes out on Tuesday.

Greg Behrendt is one of our favorite standup comedians.  He’s also the only standup comedian of whom we are aware with a tattoo that says “Dress Better.”  His new special, “Greg Behrendt is That Guy From That Thing,” premiers tonight at midnight (11 central) on Comedy Central.  You can order it on DVD from Amazon for $8.49 - it comes out on Tuesday.