Q & Answer: My Arms Are Long. Where Can I Buy Clothes?
Abe asks: My question to you is how to shop if you have long arms? 
 In my case, I am 6’3” and my arm length is almost 40 inches. Given that tall/long clothing usually has 37 inch arms, what can I guy like me do in terms of off the rack clothing? Surely I am not the only one with this problem!
We get questions like this all the time from readers with extraordinary physical proportions. (I’m 6’3”, with longish arms, and they’re four inches shorter than Abe’s.) The truth is that you’ll simply have to go custom.
There are many retailers which offer tall sizes - online, I’d say you can check out LL Bean, Lands’ End, Banana Republic and J. Crew, for starters. That’ll work if you’re just a little taller than average. But if you’re way taller than average, or have much longer legs, or much longer arms, or a very, very small neck, or some other physical proportion that makes you Very Special… off the rack isn’t going to work for you.
The good news, though, is that we live in a golden age of custom clothes. It can sometimes take a few tries to get the fit right without an in-person consultation (and if you can afford it, I’d recommend a local, in-person maker), but if you can’t buy off the rack, it’s absolutely worth it. Derek wrote a series about custom shirts, and you can start there.

Q & Answer: My Arms Are Long. Where Can I Buy Clothes?

Abe asks: My question to you is how to shop if you have long arms?

 In my case, I am 6’3” and my arm length is almost 40 inches. Given that tall/long clothing usually has 37 inch arms, what can I guy like me do in terms of off the rack clothing? Surely I am not the only one with this problem!

We get questions like this all the time from readers with extraordinary physical proportions. (I’m 6’3”, with longish arms, and they’re four inches shorter than Abe’s.) The truth is that you’ll simply have to go custom.

There are many retailers which offer tall sizes - online, I’d say you can check out LL Bean, Lands’ End, Banana Republic and J. Crew, for starters. That’ll work if you’re just a little taller than average. But if you’re way taller than average, or have much longer legs, or much longer arms, or a very, very small neck, or some other physical proportion that makes you Very Special… off the rack isn’t going to work for you.

The good news, though, is that we live in a golden age of custom clothes. It can sometimes take a few tries to get the fit right without an in-person consultation (and if you can afford it, I’d recommend a local, in-person maker), but if you can’t buy off the rack, it’s absolutely worth it. Derek wrote a series about custom shirts, and you can start there.

Q and Answer
Sam writes:
I’m tall. 6’3” or so. I like the look of a thicker knot in a necktie for some occasions, but if I try anything other than a four-in-hand I end up with a tie that is too short.   I realize there are longer ties available, but that brings with it the limited options and history of bad fashion at big-and-tall shops. Any advice? 
Sam, I myself am 6’3”, and don’t worry: there is help!
First of all: there’s nothing wrong with the four-in-hand.  Best tie knot around.  Versatile, rakish, handsome, never ostentatious.  However, if you want to fill out a spread collar, a bigger knot is great to have in your repotoire.
I agree with you that avoiding big-and-tall shops is a great idea.  Especially if you’re just tall - they tend to make clothes for people who are both.
Two sources for longer neckties come to mind.  On the budget side, Land’s End is a great source.  They offer many traditional necktie styles, and while their quality isn’t world-class, it’s very good for the price.  Here’s a classic Churchill dot tie, for example - long size is only $19.99.  You can also try some focused Ebay searching for long ties that may net some similar options.
If you’re willing to spend a bit more, you can get your ties made to your exact preferences by Sam Hober.  They charge $80 for hand-made neckties in any length and width, so you can buy a tie that fits you perfectly.  I bought the tie I wore in my wedding from Sam Hober, and while it took quite some time to arrive (the cost of bespoke), the quality is quite nice, and it’s a relief to have a tie with a rear blade that actually reaches past the keeper loop. Of course, Hober is also a great option for shorter men who have the opposite problem.
Hopefully some combination of these two will help keep you from looking like Oliver Hardy whenever you’re suited up.

Q and Answer

Sam writes:

I’m tall. 6’3” or so. I like the look of a thicker knot in a necktie for some occasions, but if I try anything other than a four-in-hand I end up with a tie that is too short.   I realize there are longer ties available, but that brings with it the limited options and history of bad fashion at big-and-tall shops. Any advice?

Sam, I myself am 6’3”, and don’t worry: there is help!

First of all: there’s nothing wrong with the four-in-hand.  Best tie knot around.  Versatile, rakish, handsome, never ostentatious.  However, if you want to fill out a spread collar, a bigger knot is great to have in your repotoire.

I agree with you that avoiding big-and-tall shops is a great idea.  Especially if you’re just tall - they tend to make clothes for people who are both.

Two sources for longer neckties come to mind.  On the budget side, Land’s End is a great source.  They offer many traditional necktie styles, and while their quality isn’t world-class, it’s very good for the price.  Here’s a classic Churchill dot tie, for example - long size is only $19.99.  You can also try some focused Ebay searching for long ties that may net some similar options.

If you’re willing to spend a bit more, you can get your ties made to your exact preferences by Sam Hober.  They charge $80 for hand-made neckties in any length and width, so you can buy a tie that fits you perfectly.  I bought the tie I wore in my wedding from Sam Hober, and while it took quite some time to arrive (the cost of bespoke), the quality is quite nice, and it’s a relief to have a tie with a rear blade that actually reaches past the keeper loop. Of course, Hober is also a great option for shorter men who have the opposite problem.

Hopefully some combination of these two will help keep you from looking like Oliver Hardy whenever you’re suited up.