I Colori Di Antonio Screening

Readers in New York City might be interested in a film screening happening this April 3rd at 7pm for I Colori Di Antonio (a film about the Florentine tailor Antonio Liverano). The event will take place at the School of Visual Arts’ Beatrice Theater, which is located at 333 West 23rd Street (between 8th and 9th Avenue). After the screening, there will be refreshments and a Q&A session with Antonio Liverano and the director Gianluca Migliarotti. Tickets can be bought here, and a webpage for the film can be found here

Real People: Finding Your “Voice”

Ethan Newton of The Armoury recently wrote a nice piece about finding one’s “voice” when it comes style, and it reminded me of Niyi in New York. Niyi is a bold dresser, often wearing things I’d never wear, and using them in a ways I’d never consider, but he’s also often pulling off looks that I admire. 

Above are two good examples. In the first photo, he’s wearing a tie I also happen to own. It’s a striped burgundy raw silk from Drake’s, which they sold a couple of years ago. When I wear mine, I pair it with a simple, light-blue, striped shirt and a conservative solid-tan sport coat. Niyi, on the other hand, is wearing his here with a dotted lime green shirt (!) and a more attention grabbing seersucker suit. 

In the second photo, he’s in a more somber, solid navy suit, but has enlivened the look with his choice in a tie and pocket square. The tie is actually from his own accessories line. It’s a navy cotton that’s been treated to a process called adire, a kind of hand-dyeing treatment developed by the Yoruba people of Nigeria. Niyi himself is of Yoruba descent, and his men’s accessories line heavily reflects his heritage. You can check it out at his website and (soon) Sid Mashburn

I’ve always believed that you don’t have to share other people’s choices in clothing in order to appreciate their style. Niyi’s bold sense of dress reflects his personality as much as my conservative sensibilities reflect mine. It’s this diversity of dress, and pursuit to find one’s own “voice” as Ethan puts it, that makes dressing personal, social, and fun. 

High Rise with Pleats
I love this photo of our friends over at The Armoury. The guy on the right is Jake, who’s wearing a pair of high waisted, grey flannel trousers built with single pleats. All too often, I read bloggers and fashion writers say that high-waisted trousers and pleated pants should be categorically avoided, or that you should only wear pleats if you’re a heavy set man. That’s a bunch of nonsense. You’d be surprised how good both can look if the tailoring is done well. 
One upside to having a higher rise is that your shirt and belt don’t peek out when your jacket is buttoned, as your trouser’s waistline will be closer to your jacket’s buttoning point. That said, a higher-rise can look great when the jacket is open or closed, as evidenced by Alan and Jake above. 
(photo via lnsee)

High Rise with Pleats

I love this photo of our friends over at The Armoury. The guy on the right is Jake, who’s wearing a pair of high waisted, grey flannel trousers built with single pleats. All too often, I read bloggers and fashion writers say that high-waisted trousers and pleated pants should be categorically avoided, or that you should only wear pleats if you’re a heavy set man. That’s a bunch of nonsense. You’d be surprised how good both can look if the tailoring is done well. 

One upside to having a higher rise is that your shirt and belt don’t peek out when your jacket is buttoned, as your trouser’s waistline will be closer to your jacket’s buttoning point. That said, a higher-rise can look great when the jacket is open or closed, as evidenced by Alan and Jake above. 

(photo via lnsee)

The Armoury NYC
Our friends over at The Armoury are opening their first US store next week, on Tuesday, December 10th. The shop is located at 168 Duane Street in TriBeCa, New York City. NYC is full of great menswear shops, and this just gives me another reason to be jealous I don’t live there. If you’re in NYC, you really ought to stop by. It will probably be like seeing their beautiful blog come alive. 

The Armoury NYC

Our friends over at The Armoury are opening their first US store next week, on Tuesday, December 10th. The shop is located at 168 Duane Street in TriBeCa, New York City. NYC is full of great menswear shops, and this just gives me another reason to be jealous I don’t live there. If you’re in NYC, you really ought to stop by. It will probably be like seeing their beautiful blog come alive. 

Rus in Urbe

In some parts of the world (namely England), it used to be that men’s clothing could be cleaved in half, so that there was a certain style of dress for the country, and certain style for the city. That time has long passed, and most men today have a lot more freedom in how they dress themselves, but even before things became so casual, there was a practice that some describe as “rus in urbe.” The term  means “country in the city,” and it was first coined by the Spanish poet Martial (though obviously not for sartorial purposes). In men’s dress, however, it means wearing clothes originally designed for countryside sporting pursuits, but in town. It was a way for men in the city to pull off a certain casual look, while still staying quite sharp.

It also happens to be a great style for fall. Dressing rus in urbe means relying on certain textures, patterns, and colors. Think prickly tweeds, ribbed corduroys, and velvety moleskins; patterns such as plaids and tattersalls; and colors such as rich browns, dark greens, and deep burgundies. Throw in a pair of country brogues or boots, particularly if they’re in a soft suede or a hard shell cordovan, and give your pants some nice, deep cuffs. You’ll have a great look this season. 

Of course, there’s always a way of taking things too far. I’ve seen men (on the internet anyway) forcibly layering every rustic item they have on their bodies. A tweed jacket is worn awkwardly over a quilted vest, which are then layered on top of a shawl collar cardigan and tweed waistcoat, under which you can see a wool tie and checked shirt. This kind of fifteen-level fall-layering can look incredibly contrived unless you’re posing for a Ralph Lauren ad.

Better, I think, to stick to something a bit simpler, like our friend Voxsartoria, who has a corduroy suit, or our other friend Mark (from The Armoury), who has paired a waxed Barbour jacket with some jeans. Gianni Angelli in the first photo also looks great in just a simple tweed jacket, blue shirt, and some brown corduroys. Rus in urbe doesn’t have to mean looking like you’re off to hunt pheasants on Main Avenue. When done well, it should look quite natural. 

(Images via Milstil, The Sartorialist, Voxsartoria, The Armoury, and Gezza’s Eyes)

Films about Italian Tailors

The long awaited Men of Cloth film is premiering in New York next month. The film is about three Italian tailors facing the decline of the apprenticeship system. Traditionally, very young men (often children, really), enter the tailoring trade at an early age, but with growing opportunities elsewhere, fewer and fewer have gone into tailoring, which has left many master tailors without students. This particular film focuses on three men: Nino Corvato and Joe Centofanti, who are both traditional custom tailors in the US, and Checchino Fonticoli, who has spent his entire career at Brioni.

The film is premiering on November 19th and 21st at New York’s Documentary Festival (Doc NYC). You can buy tickets here, and see the trailer here. Some other interesting documentaries will be at the festival, which you can browse here. Seems like it could make for a fun activity if you’re in town. 

Also, in case you’re unaware, our friend Gianluca Migliarotti (who directed and produced O’Mast) recently came out with a documentary on Florentine tailor Antonio Liverano. I had the opportunity to see it some time ago, and it’s a great film. Recommendable to anyone passionate about Italian tailoring, bespoke clothing, or even just traditional men’s style in general. You can see the trailer here. DVDs can be bought from The ArmouryExquisite Trimmings, or The Hanger Project

Chelsea Boots
For as long as I’ve been interested in shoes, I’ve always favored boots, and one of the first kinds of boots I fell in love with were Chelseas. Chelseas are a kind of ankle-length, pull-on boot with elastic side gussets. They were invented in the mid-19th century as an alternative to the button boot, but they didn’t really gain popularity until the 1960s, when they were picked up by young men in Chelsea, London (hence the name) and then famously worn by The Beatles (though technically speaking, the Beatles wore a modified version of the Chelsea).
Various English shoe companies make Chelseas in their most classic form (the kind that we associate with the Mod movement of the 1960s). On the uppermost end, there’s Edward Green’s Newmarket, which are fantastically beautiful, but also fantastically expensive. A bit more affordable (but still quite expensive) is Crockett & Jones. They have three versions, simply named models 3, 5, and 8. Their Chelsea 3, being the sleekest and featuring a single-layer leather sole, is the dressiest. Models 5 and 8, on the other hand, are built on studded Dainite soles, with number 8 being a nice, almond-toe compromise between the sleekness of number 3 and the roundness of 5. You can buy these from Crockett & Jones or Barneys New York, though Pediwear, Robert Old, and P. Lal will likely have better prices (note, P. Lal’s prices are denoted in Malaysian ringgit, so you have to convert them).
Slightly more affordable options can be had through Grenson, Shipton & Heneage, and Carmina. Our friends at The Armoury stock the Carmina version in the very sleek Simpson last, while Skoaktiebolaget sells them in the slightly less tapered Rain (a last, as many readers know, is the form that the shoe’s leather is pulled over, and is what determines the shoe’s shape). Carmina can also custom make Chelseas for you, where you choose the last and material, but this comes at a 50% upcharge.
For something more affordable still, there’s Loake and Herring, Charles Tyrwhitt (don’t be fooled by the sale, as they’re always on sale), Markowski, and RM Williams. You can also check eBay, although you’ll want to be careful to avoid the frumpy versions (I’m not a fan of Blundstones, though my friend Jake over at Wax Wane likes them).
If you’re considering getting a pair, try them in black. Those are arguably the easiest and most versatile to wear. If shaped right, and built on a leather sole, they could span everything from suits to jeans. Brown leather would also work well, although on the suit end, they might need to be paired with more casual options (Mark over at The Armoury can be seen here looking great in his tan suit, blue gingham shirt, and Gaziano & Girling Chelseas). Brown suede could also be nice, especially under a pair of tan cavalry twill trousers or some light, washed blue jeans. Whatever you choose, I recommend wearing them with a slim trouser leg, just to keep with the Mod tradition.

Chelsea Boots

For as long as I’ve been interested in shoes, I’ve always favored boots, and one of the first kinds of boots I fell in love with were Chelseas. Chelseas are a kind of ankle-length, pull-on boot with elastic side gussets. They were invented in the mid-19th century as an alternative to the button boot, but they didn’t really gain popularity until the 1960s, when they were picked up by young men in Chelsea, London (hence the name) and then famously worn by The Beatles (though technically speaking, the Beatles wore a modified version of the Chelsea).

Various English shoe companies make Chelseas in their most classic form (the kind that we associate with the Mod movement of the 1960s). On the uppermost end, there’s Edward Green’s Newmarket, which are fantastically beautiful, but also fantastically expensive. A bit more affordable (but still quite expensive) is Crockett & Jones. They have three versions, simply named models 3, 5, and 8. Their Chelsea 3, being the sleekest and featuring a single-layer leather sole, is the dressiest. Models 5 and 8, on the other hand, are built on studded Dainite soles, with number 8 being a nice, almond-toe compromise between the sleekness of number 3 and the roundness of 5. You can buy these from Crockett & Jones or Barneys New York, though Pediwear, Robert Old, and P. Lal will likely have better prices (note, P. Lal’s prices are denoted in Malaysian ringgit, so you have to convert them).

Slightly more affordable options can be had through Grenson, Shipton & Heneage, and Carmina. Our friends at The Armoury stock the Carmina version in the very sleek Simpson last, while Skoaktiebolaget sells them in the slightly less tapered Rain (a last, as many readers know, is the form that the shoe’s leather is pulled over, and is what determines the shoe’s shape). Carmina can also custom make Chelseas for you, where you choose the last and material, but this comes at a 50% upcharge.

For something more affordable still, there’s Loake and Herring, Charles Tyrwhitt (don’t be fooled by the sale, as they’re always on sale), Markowski, and RM Williams. You can also check eBay, although you’ll want to be careful to avoid the frumpy versions (I’m not a fan of Blundstones, though my friend Jake over at Wax Wane likes them).

If you’re considering getting a pair, try them in black. Those are arguably the easiest and most versatile to wear. If shaped right, and built on a leather sole, they could span everything from suits to jeans. Brown leather would also work well, although on the suit end, they might need to be paired with more casual options (Mark over at The Armoury can be seen here looking great in his tan suit, blue gingham shirt, and Gaziano & Girling Chelseas). Brown suede could also be nice, especially under a pair of tan cavalry twill trousers or some light, washed blue jeans. Whatever you choose, I recommend wearing them with a slim trouser leg, just to keep with the Mod tradition.

Finding a Higher Rise Chino
For the last few months, I’ve been looking for chinos built with a higher rise. As some readers may know, I favor pants that sit higher on the hips, as I find this helps elongate the leg line and gives better proportions between the torso and legs. Unfortunately, it’s not easy to find such pants nowadays, as the fashion trend for the last ten years has been for low-rise cuts. After writing a post about my search, however, a few kind readers sent me some good suggestions. 
The first, and I think the best, is from The Armoury. These are made by Ring Jacket, a high-end Japanese company known for their tailored clothing. They sit just below the navel, which is high enough to give the effect you’d want, but low enough so you can wear your chinos without a sport coat. The leg is also nice and slim, and the trousers are lined a bit past the knee. You can see them worn by Mark in the photo above.
The Armory’s chinos cost $370, which is pricey, but the pants are exceptionally well built. They’re not available on the website, so you’ll have to email or call them to order. 
A bit more affordable are the ones from J. Press, which were recommended to me by Bruce Boyer. These are fuller in the leg and sit higher on the waist. I think these are some of the nicest traditionally cut trousers I’ve ever come across, but the higher-waisted cut does mean you should probably wear them with sport coats. If you plan to, the price here starts at $120, but there are occasional seasonal sales that will drop them down by 25%. 
More affordable still is Jack Donnelly’s Dalton chinos, which come in both a slim and traditional cut. The slim is more like The Armoury’s, while the traditional is more like J Press’. The difference is that the fabric isn’t as nice, the fit not as clean (at least on me), and the finishing inside is a bit rough (almost unusually so, actually). On the upside, they’re $95 and they have a very nice return policy, so trying them out is more or less risk-free. 
A couple of other good ideas were sent to me. Bill Khaki’s M2 model is a favorite for many people, and some recommended the custom chinos at J. Hilburn and Luxire. Luxire can copy an existing pair of pants for you, which is nice if you’re wary of the made-to-measure process. One reader also recommended these Blackbird chinos, though they’re on final sale, and thus not returnable.
(Photo above by The Armoury)

Finding a Higher Rise Chino

For the last few months, I’ve been looking for chinos built with a higher rise. As some readers may know, I favor pants that sit higher on the hips, as I find this helps elongate the leg line and gives better proportions between the torso and legs. Unfortunately, it’s not easy to find such pants nowadays, as the fashion trend for the last ten years has been for low-rise cuts. After writing a post about my search, however, a few kind readers sent me some good suggestions. 

The first, and I think the best, is from The Armoury. These are made by Ring Jacket, a high-end Japanese company known for their tailored clothing. They sit just below the navel, which is high enough to give the effect you’d want, but low enough so you can wear your chinos without a sport coat. The leg is also nice and slim, and the trousers are lined a bit past the knee. You can see them worn by Mark in the photo above.

The Armory’s chinos cost $370, which is pricey, but the pants are exceptionally well built. They’re not available on the website, so you’ll have to email or call them to order. 

A bit more affordable are the ones from J. Press, which were recommended to me by Bruce Boyer. These are fuller in the leg and sit higher on the waist. I think these are some of the nicest traditionally cut trousers I’ve ever come across, but the higher-waisted cut does mean you should probably wear them with sport coats. If you plan to, the price here starts at $120, but there are occasional seasonal sales that will drop them down by 25%. 

More affordable still is Jack Donnelly’s Dalton chinos, which come in both a slim and traditional cut. The slim is more like The Armoury’s, while the traditional is more like J Press’. The difference is that the fabric isn’t as nice, the fit not as clean (at least on me), and the finishing inside is a bit rough (almost unusually so, actually). On the upside, they’re $95 and they have a very nice return policy, so trying them out is more or less risk-free. 

A couple of other good ideas were sent to me. Bill Khaki’s M2 model is a favorite for many people, and some recommended the custom chinos at J. Hilburn and Luxire. Luxire can copy an existing pair of pants for you, which is nice if you’re wary of the made-to-measure process. One reader also recommended these Blackbird chinos, though they’re on final sale, and thus not returnable.

(Photo above by The Armoury)

A Simple Summer Look
I love this Apparel Arts illustration. I found it last year on an online men’s clothing forum, and put it in my head to try to find similar pieces. Unfortunately, by the time I did, summer had already passed. This year, however, I’ll be wearing this on more than a few occasions once the weather gets hot (though, I’ll probably leave the ascot and pipe to more dashing men).
The great thing about this is how stylish it looks with just a few simple pieces. To get something like this for yourself, consider this long-sleeved polo from Kent Wang. Though not technically the same as what you see above, I think long sleeves rolled up look better than short ones. I also find that long sleeved polos have the advantage of being able to do double duty underneath sport coats. They show the bit of requisite shirt cuff underneath the jacket sleeve, and ensure that no bare wrists will be exposed when you move your arms. If you want something sportier, however, Kent has a number of short sleeve options as well.
The upside to Kent’s polos is that they have a few “button up shirt details” that make them look a bit smarter than your average tennis shirt. The collar band, for example, is reinforced, so the collar doesn’t flop down and lay flat against your shoulder (like you’d see on most polos). The downside, however, is that they fit very slim and the sleeves can be a bit tight. Kent has measurements posted though, and he accepts returns.
For other options, Jesse has recommended Lands’ End. I also really like this new polo at The Armoury, which I believe was made for them by Ascot Chang. To order one, you’ll have to call or email their store (expect the price to be higher than either Kent’s or Lands’ End).
Tan trousers are harder to find. For mine, I bought a pair of flannel ones from Howard Yount, but they’re sold out now and won’t be restocking until fall. Flannel has a bit of richness and mottling that’ll help keep this from looking like a Best Buy employee uniform. You can find something similar at the moment at O’Connell’s and J Press, the second of which is having a sale right now. And though they’re not tan, these Pantas look fantastic. Their prices aren’t cheap, but their pants are some of the highest quality you’ll find in the ready-to-wear market.  
Finally, for the creped-soled shoes, consider some of the options I mentioned a few weeks ago. I think pair of sueded, dark brown chukkas with rubber crepe soles here would look great.

A Simple Summer Look

I love this Apparel Arts illustration. I found it last year on an online men’s clothing forum, and put it in my head to try to find similar pieces. Unfortunately, by the time I did, summer had already passed. This year, however, I’ll be wearing this on more than a few occasions once the weather gets hot (though, I’ll probably leave the ascot and pipe to more dashing men).

The great thing about this is how stylish it looks with just a few simple pieces. To get something like this for yourself, consider this long-sleeved polo from Kent Wang. Though not technically the same as what you see above, I think long sleeves rolled up look better than short ones. I also find that long sleeved polos have the advantage of being able to do double duty underneath sport coats. They show the bit of requisite shirt cuff underneath the jacket sleeve, and ensure that no bare wrists will be exposed when you move your arms. If you want something sportier, however, Kent has a number of short sleeve options as well.

The upside to Kent’s polos is that they have a few “button up shirt details” that make them look a bit smarter than your average tennis shirt. The collar band, for example, is reinforced, so the collar doesn’t flop down and lay flat against your shoulder (like you’d see on most polos). The downside, however, is that they fit very slim and the sleeves can be a bit tight. Kent has measurements posted though, and he accepts returns.

For other options, Jesse has recommended Lands’ End. I also really like this new polo at The Armoury, which I believe was made for them by Ascot Chang. To order one, you’ll have to call or email their store (expect the price to be higher than either Kent’s or Lands’ End).

Tan trousers are harder to find. For mine, I bought a pair of flannel ones from Howard Yount, but they’re sold out now and won’t be restocking until fall. Flannel has a bit of richness and mottling that’ll help keep this from looking like a Best Buy employee uniform. You can find something similar at the moment at O’Connell’s and J Press, the second of which is having a sale right now. And though they’re not tan, these Pantas look fantastic. Their prices aren’t cheap, but their pants are some of the highest quality you’ll find in the ready-to-wear market.  

Finally, for the creped-soled shoes, consider some of the options I mentioned a few weeks ago. I think pair of sueded, dark brown chukkas with rubber crepe soles here would look great.

Start With a Good Cloth
I love this photo by Ethan Desu. It reminds me that at their foundation, all nice garments begin with a good cloth. The man pictured here is Taka from Liverano & Liverano, a bespoke tailoring house in Florence, Italy. His clothes are fairly simple – a navy sport coat, blue shirt, and a burgundy silk tie with medallions printed on it – but what makes them beautiful is how rich and handsome the fabrics look. The slightly fuzzy nap and barely discernible twill lines on the jacket, which is made from a vintage Harris Tweed, are especially appealing.
If you take the time to sample enough cloth, and pay attention to what you feel, you’ll soon be able to discern the quality of a fabric the moment you touch it. Good wools, for example, will feel lively and rich in the hand. If you pinch them between your index finger and thumb, they’ll easily roll and sometimes even feel a bit springy. Bad wool, on the other hand, will feel flat, lifeless, and might even be a bit crushable. Bad cottons will also feel a bit “paper-y.” More than these “tests” though, you should always go with your gut, emotive reaction. A good cloth will always look and feel beautiful, while a bad cloth will be dull and uninteresting. In some ways, it’s as simple as that.
The online community of men’s style enthusiasts loves to obsess over details that most people won’t notice. I’m not saying a garment’s design isn’t important, but at their core, a beautiful garment starts with a good cloth and a nice cut. Considerations such as patch vs. welted pockets come after. 
(Photo from ethandesu)

Start With a Good Cloth

I love this photo by Ethan Desu. It reminds me that at their foundation, all nice garments begin with a good cloth. The man pictured here is Taka from Liverano & Liverano, a bespoke tailoring house in Florence, Italy. His clothes are fairly simple – a navy sport coat, blue shirt, and a burgundy silk tie with medallions printed on it – but what makes them beautiful is how rich and handsome the fabrics look. The slightly fuzzy nap and barely discernible twill lines on the jacket, which is made from a vintage Harris Tweed, are especially appealing.

If you take the time to sample enough cloth, and pay attention to what you feel, you’ll soon be able to discern the quality of a fabric the moment you touch it. Good wools, for example, will feel lively and rich in the hand. If you pinch them between your index finger and thumb, they’ll easily roll and sometimes even feel a bit springy. Bad wool, on the other hand, will feel flat, lifeless, and might even be a bit crushable. Bad cottons will also feel a bit “paper-y.” More than these “tests” though, you should always go with your gut, emotive reaction. A good cloth will always look and feel beautiful, while a bad cloth will be dull and uninteresting. In some ways, it’s as simple as that.

The online community of men’s style enthusiasts loves to obsess over details that most people won’t notice. I’m not saying a garment’s design isn’t important, but at their core, a beautiful garment starts with a good cloth and a nice cut. Considerations such as patch vs. welted pockets come after. 

(Photo from ethandesu)