Real People: Dressing Down a Suit

Open any men’s fashion magazine nowadays and you can read about the 101 ways to dress down a suit. The problem is, the suit is more often than not a sober looking garment, so when you try to “dress it down,” it can be like painting a mustache on the Mona Lisa. A safer way to dress down a suit is to simply get a more casual suit. Instead of one made from a smooth, worsted wool, try something in cotton, linen, corduroy, or even tweed. That way, your suit is inherently more casual, and you won’t have to awkwardly try to pull back its formality with some unusual accessory.

That does require buying a separate suit for casual occasions, however, which can get expensive (especially once you factor in seasonal fabrics). If you want to try to dress down a standard business suit, try pairing one with a softly colored pastel shirt, perhaps something in pink, lavender, or sea green. Any of those will be more casual than your standard solid whites or light blues, and can help both soften the edge of a suit while also enlivening its look. If need be, you can dress it down further with some casual footwear, such as tassel loafers or something made from suede. Our friend Niyi in New York City shows how well can look above.

You can get pastel colored shirts at any number of places these days. Ralph Lauren and Brooks Brothers are good starts, so long as you stay away from the ones with embroidered logos. Our advertiser Ledbury has a lime green one in their “short run shirts” section until the end of today. If you want something custom made, I can recommend Ascot Chang. They have offices in New York City and Los Angeles, although they also tour throughout the United States to meet clients (I meet them in San Francisco twice a year). They do great work, but being bespoke, they are a bit pricey. For something more affordable, but custom, there’s Cottonwork and our advertiser Proper Cloth. For something affordable, but ready to wear, there’s TM Lewin and Thin Red Line.

It’s On Sale: Thin Red Line Shirts
Thin Red Line is a British shirt company who make traditionally-styled dress shirts. A couple of times a year, they drop their prices to £19, which is about $30. Subtract VAT and they end up at $26 each. Along with T.M. Lewin’s occasional sales at that price, they’re one of the best dress shirt values under fifty bucks, even if you’re in the States and have to pay international shipping. The brand’s slim fit isn’t fashion slim, so if you’re very skinny, it might not suit, but if you’re of modest build, it’s a solid cut. Shirts are here, use the code “SANTA13” for the discount.

It’s On Sale: Thin Red Line Shirts

Thin Red Line is a British shirt company who make traditionally-styled dress shirts. A couple of times a year, they drop their prices to £19, which is about $30. Subtract VAT and they end up at $26 each. Along with T.M. Lewin’s occasional sales at that price, they’re one of the best dress shirt values under fifty bucks, even if you’re in the States and have to pay international shipping. The brand’s slim fit isn’t fashion slim, so if you’re very skinny, it might not suit, but if you’re of modest build, it’s a solid cut. Shirts are here, use the code “SANTA13” for the discount.

Put This On Season 2 Episode 2 Clothing Credits

Introduction & Thrifting with Street Etiquette

Suit - High Society Tailors (fabric by Molloy & Sons)

Scarf - Vintage Brooks Brothers

Shirt - Thin Red Line

Tie - Drake’s of London

Square - Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Shoes - Vintage Florsheim

How It’s Made: Leonard Logsdail

Coat - Vintage Kiton

Shirt - CEGO Custom Shirtmakers

Tie - Lands’ End

Square - Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Trousers - Pro Tailor

Shoes - Vintage Alden

Put This On Season 2 Episode 3 Clothing Credits

Intro & Savile Row

Coat - Vintage by Capper & Capper

Scarf - Courtesy of Christine Cariati

Gloves - Vintage

Hat - Vintage by Royal Stetson

Suit - Vintage by Giacomo Trabalza

Cardigan - Vintage by Brooks Brothers (From S2E2)

Shirt - Thin Red Line

Tie - Ralph Lauren Purple Label

Pocket Square - Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Shoes - Vintage Alden

How It’s Made: Drake’s Necktie

Suit - High Society Tailor (cloth by Molloy & Sons)

Cuff Links - Vintage

Shirt - Thin Red Line

Tie - Vintage Carroll & Co.

Square - Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Season 2 Episode 4 Clothing Credits

Introduction

Overcoat - Vintage by Capper & Capper

Scarf - Courtesy of Christine Cariati

Hat - Courtesy of W. Bill

Q and Answer

Coat - Polo Ralph Lauren

Sweater - Vintage

Tie - Cordings

Shirt - Thin Red Line

Pocket Square - Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Scarf - Courtesy Christine Cariati

Hat - Courtesy W. Bill

Trousers - Pro Tailor, Los Angeles

Shoes - Vintage Florsheim

David Saxby

Suit - High Society Tailor (cloth by Molloy & Sons)

Cuff Links - Vintage

Shirt - Thin Red Line

Tie - Vintage Carroll & Co.

Square - Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Season Two, Episode One: Clothing Credits

Introduction

Cap: J. Press

Scarf: Johnstons of Elgin

Coat: Capper & Capper (Vintage)

Gloves: Brooks Brothers

The ‘Lo Heads

Coat: Polo Ralph Lauren

Shirt: Charvet (Vintage)

Tie: Ralph Lauren Purple Label

Sweater: Vintage

Pocket Square: Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Trousers: Pro Tailor

Shoes: Alden

Q & Answer

Suit: High Society Tailor, cloth by Molloy & Sons

Shirt: Thin Red Line

Tie: Drake’s

Pocket Square: Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

The English shirt makers Thin Red Line are offering a pretty remarkable deal today. Sign up for an account on their site, and all shirts are just £14.99 - or about $25. This is a 65% discount off their usual price of £45 ($75). In fact, there’s currently an additional 20% off for members that brings the price down to $20(!) per shirt. I ordered six shirts and paid, including shipping, $150.
These shirts are solid, traditional English shirts. The quality isn’t remarkable in most ways, more TM Lewin than Turnbull & Asser, but the half-dozen shirts I bought in the last crazy sale have been workhorses in my wardrobe. They do have some nice details, like gussets at the side seams and convertible double cuffs. Really this is an opportunity to score real basics - like solid blue and whites - for a great price.
My biggest complaints about the last round I bought (slightly baggy fit, stiff collars) have, they say, been addressed in a redesign that introduced a slim fit option and a softer interlining, so I’m very hopeful. From what I’ve read, the new “slim fit” is a moderately slim fit, not a dramatically slim fit, which is good for a medium-sized guy like me. More comparable, in other words, to Brooks Brothers’ slim fit than an Italian slim fit, or Brooks’ extra-slim.
So if you need to build a basic shirt wardrobe, you could do much, much worse than a few whites and blues in single and double-cuff variations and a few patterns from Thin Red Line.
(One technical note: I found that in Firefox, I had to hit refresh once on a few of the shirt pages before picking my options in order to successfully add stuff to my cart. And from what their customer support folks told me, some US debit cards have odd verification issues, so use a credit card if you want to avoid that.)

The English shirt makers Thin Red Line are offering a pretty remarkable deal today. Sign up for an account on their site, and all shirts are just £14.99 - or about $25. This is a 65% discount off their usual price of £45 ($75). In fact, there’s currently an additional 20% off for members that brings the price down to $20(!) per shirt. I ordered six shirts and paid, including shipping, $150.

These shirts are solid, traditional English shirts. The quality isn’t remarkable in most ways, more TM Lewin than Turnbull & Asser, but the half-dozen shirts I bought in the last crazy sale have been workhorses in my wardrobe. They do have some nice details, like gussets at the side seams and convertible double cuffs. Really this is an opportunity to score real basics - like solid blue and whites - for a great price.

My biggest complaints about the last round I bought (slightly baggy fit, stiff collars) have, they say, been addressed in a redesign that introduced a slim fit option and a softer interlining, so I’m very hopeful. From what I’ve read, the new “slim fit” is a moderately slim fit, not a dramatically slim fit, which is good for a medium-sized guy like me. More comparable, in other words, to Brooks Brothers’ slim fit than an Italian slim fit, or Brooks’ extra-slim.

So if you need to build a basic shirt wardrobe, you could do much, much worse than a few whites and blues in single and double-cuff variations and a few patterns from Thin Red Line.

(One technical note: I found that in Firefox, I had to hit refresh once on a few of the shirt pages before picking my options in order to successfully add stuff to my cart. And from what their customer support folks told me, some US debit cards have odd verification issues, so use a credit card if you want to avoid that.)

It’s On Sale!
The good people at the UK’s Thin Red Line are continuing their clearance sale.  Their made-in-England dress shirts, which are quite nice, are only £9.99 - or about $15.  Shipping across the water costs about $30, so this is a better deal for Americans who are buying three or four shirts, but I must say that I bought five or six and was completely satisfied with my purchase.  They’re not Borrelli, but for fifteen bucks a piece, they’re wonderful.  And neckties and ladies’ shirts are now £9.99 as well.
ThinRedLine.com

It’s On Sale!

The good people at the UK’s Thin Red Line are continuing their clearance sale.  Their made-in-England dress shirts, which are quite nice, are only £9.99 - or about $15.  Shipping across the water costs about $30, so this is a better deal for Americans who are buying three or four shirts, but I must say that I bought five or six and was completely satisfied with my purchase.  They’re not Borrelli, but for fifteen bucks a piece, they’re wonderful.  And neckties and ladies’ shirts are now £9.99 as well.

ThinRedLine.com