Q and Answer: Of Breasts and Lapel Holes
DT asks: Why do peak lapels sometimes have a hole stitched into both lapels?  Why is this never (rarely?) seen with notch lapels? Is there a protocol  for which hole to use for different occasions?
Double-breasted jackets often (but not always) have buttonholes in each lapel. This is really a matter of symmetry and aesthetics - some feel that because of the prominent lapels, a little balance is in order.
Generally speaking, if you’re wearing something in the lapel, you should put it on the left hand side, whether there’s one hole or two, as on our pal Will, above.

Q and Answer: Of Breasts and Lapel Holes

DT asks: Why do peak lapels sometimes have a hole stitched into both lapels? Why is this never (rarely?) seen with notch lapels? Is there a protocol for which hole to use for different occasions?

Double-breasted jackets often (but not always) have buttonholes in each lapel. This is really a matter of symmetry and aesthetics - some feel that because of the prominent lapels, a little balance is in order.

Generally speaking, if you’re wearing something in the lapel, you should put it on the left hand side, whether there’s one hole or two, as on our pal Will, above.

There’s a wonderful roundup of lapel ornamentation at Die Workwear, including the above option, adapted from Germanic hat decoration. A perfect tie-in with my current obsession - trying to figure out a way to wear a Tyrolean hat in public without looking like a clown.

There’s a wonderful roundup of lapel ornamentation at Die Workwear, including the above option, adapted from Germanic hat decoration. A perfect tie-in with my current obsession - trying to figure out a way to wear a Tyrolean hat in public without looking like a clown.

A StyleForum member named Mr. K is making and selling these lovely lapel flowers. They’re composed of a felted craft paper, sealed with clearcoat. Not the most durable item, but at two for fifteen dollars, they needn’t be.

A StyleForum member named Mr. K is making and selling these lovely lapel flowers. They’re composed of a felted craft paper, sealed with clearcoat. Not the most durable item, but at two for fifteen dollars, they needn’t be.

The English Cut creates a flower loop on the back of a lapel.  This little loop of thread is intended to hold the stem of a flower which has been threaded through your lapel buttonhole.  Your tailor can add one, too.  Mine charges me maybe three or four dollars.  If your lapel buttonhole is non-functional, your tailor can cut it and re-bind the edges, a service that won’t cost you more than about ten bucks.

How to wear a boutonniere, at The Art of Manliness.

How to wear a boutonniere, at The Art of Manliness.