It’s On Ebay
Crate “Journal” raw denim jeans.
I bought a pair of these at the Barney’s warehouse sale last spring, and really like them - but be careful, because they fit several inches smaller than the tagged size.  I bought my usual jean size and it was so small I couldn’t get them on.  So check those measurements.  But they’re very nice jeans.
Starting at $49, ends Thursday

It’s On Ebay

Crate “Journal” raw denim jeans.

I bought a pair of these at the Barney’s warehouse sale last spring, and really like them - but be careful, because they fit several inches smaller than the tagged size.  I bought my usual jean size and it was so small I couldn’t get them on.  So check those measurements.  But they’re very nice jeans.

Starting at $49, ends Thursday

Q and Answer: How Should I Size My Raw Denim?
Andrew writes:
I saw your first video, and fell in love with the idea of buying raw denim.  The problem I’m encountering, is I’m not sure how to size them properly.  I’ve seen some manufacturers recommend buying raw denim several inches larger in the waist and several inches longer in the inseam, to allow for shrinkage.  But, if I follow your advice for washing them in cold water only when necessary, I think that will probably minimize the shrinkage, since I’ll be keeping them out of the dryer.  My concern is, that if I follow the manufacturer recommendation and buy them too long, then they’ll never fit properly, unless I wash them traditionally, and wash all the indigo right out of them. 
This is important, so let’s break it down.
First of all, some raw denim is Sanforized.  This process, developed in the 1930s, more or less eliminates shrinkage.  So if you’re buying Sanforized denim (it will typically be labeled), you can buy your natural size (perhaps adding one inch in length) and you won’t even need to pre-soak.
The purpose of the soak is to shrink your jeans.  If you’re hoping to achieve maximum contrast in your fading, you want to shrink first, because otherwise, after the first wash, all your stress points will be in different places due to shrinking.  We suggested turning the jeans inside out and not agitating them to keep the dye in place while allowing the warm water and drying to shrink the fabric.
Most non-Sanforized jeans will shrink an inch or two in the waist and two or three inches in the inseam.  Levis usually suggests buying Shrink-to-Fit 501s two inches too big in the waist and three inches too long in the inseam.  However, denim stretches over time, particularly when its wet.  Our recommendation for 501s is to go the usual 2-3” long in the inseam, but go with a waistband size that fits comfortably but isn’t too loose.  Any shrink you get in the waist will stretch out over the first couple of wearings.
If you’re ever concerned that your jeans may shrink too tight, you can always put them on when they’re still a bit moist, and they’ll stretch easily and dry to your exact size.  Just be careful not to sit in any chairs - not only will you transfer dye to the seat, you’ll also stretch out the knees of your jeans and make them puffy.
Of course, jean sizing is an inexact science.  My natural waist is about 37.5”, and I wear a 36 waist in Levis jeans, be they shrink-to-fit or pre-washed.  My APC New Standards were sized a ridiculous 34 - APCs are not only absurdly vanity sized, but also extremely stretch-prone.  Your best bet is to try before you buy and get some advice from a salesman who knows his products.
Also of note: many jeans come sized only by waist.  Unless you’re extremely tall, these will end up being a bit long for you.  Take them to a tailor or alterationist and have them shortened to the appropriate length after you’ve soaked them.  Have the tailor retain the original hem - he won’t be able to match the look on his own.

Q and Answer: How Should I Size My Raw Denim?

Andrew writes:

I saw your first video, and fell in love with the idea of buying raw denim.  The problem I’m encountering, is I’m not sure how to size them properly.  I’ve seen some manufacturers recommend buying raw denim several inches larger in the waist and several inches longer in the inseam, to allow for shrinkage.  But, if I follow your advice for washing them in cold water only when necessary, I think that will probably minimize the shrinkage, since I’ll be keeping them out of the dryer.  My concern is, that if I follow the manufacturer recommendation and buy them too long, then they’ll never fit properly, unless I wash them traditionally, and wash all the indigo right out of them.

This is important, so let’s break it down.

First of all, some raw denim is Sanforized.  This process, developed in the 1930s, more or less eliminates shrinkage.  So if you’re buying Sanforized denim (it will typically be labeled), you can buy your natural size (perhaps adding one inch in length) and you won’t even need to pre-soak.

The purpose of the soak is to shrink your jeans.  If you’re hoping to achieve maximum contrast in your fading, you want to shrink first, because otherwise, after the first wash, all your stress points will be in different places due to shrinking.  We suggested turning the jeans inside out and not agitating them to keep the dye in place while allowing the warm water and drying to shrink the fabric.

Most non-Sanforized jeans will shrink an inch or two in the waist and two or three inches in the inseam.  Levis usually suggests buying Shrink-to-Fit 501s two inches too big in the waist and three inches too long in the inseam.  However, denim stretches over time, particularly when its wet.  Our recommendation for 501s is to go the usual 2-3” long in the inseam, but go with a waistband size that fits comfortably but isn’t too loose.  Any shrink you get in the waist will stretch out over the first couple of wearings.

If you’re ever concerned that your jeans may shrink too tight, you can always put them on when they’re still a bit moist, and they’ll stretch easily and dry to your exact size.  Just be careful not to sit in any chairs - not only will you transfer dye to the seat, you’ll also stretch out the knees of your jeans and make them puffy.

Of course, jean sizing is an inexact science.  My natural waist is about 37.5”, and I wear a 36 waist in Levis jeans, be they shrink-to-fit or pre-washed.  My APC New Standards were sized a ridiculous 34 - APCs are not only absurdly vanity sized, but also extremely stretch-prone.  Your best bet is to try before you buy and get some advice from a salesman who knows his products.

Also of note: many jeans come sized only by waist.  Unless you’re extremely tall, these will end up being a bit long for you.  Take them to a tailor or alterationist and have them shortened to the appropriate length after you’ve soaked them.  Have the tailor retain the original hem - he won’t be able to match the look on his own.

Junk Culture “West Coast” as featured in Put This On, Episode 1
Just a simple note of gratitude for friend of the show Deepak Mantena and his solo venture Junk Culture, whose title track “West Coast” we made liberal use of in our Q & Answer segment.
The record just came out on Illegal Art, available here for pay-as-you-wish. It’s a great great track from an extremely great record. Read a great review and take a great listen here on allmusic.

Junk Culture “West Coast” as featured in Put This On, Episode 1

Just a simple note of gratitude for friend of the show Deepak Mantena and his solo venture Junk Culture, whose title track “West Coast” we made liberal use of in our Q & Answer segment.

The record just came out on Illegal Art, available here for pay-as-you-wish. It’s a great great track from an extremely great record. Read a great review and take a great listen here on allmusic.

My mother spent several years as a textile conservator.  It was her job to clean and preserve fabrics of all kinds without damaging them for San Francisco’s The Mexican Museum.
When she saw our segment on denim care, she just about exploded out of her seat to send me an email demanding that we use Orvus Paste Shampoo rather than Woolite Dark, which is what we recommended.  And moms are always right.
Let’s start with this admission: Orvus Paste Shampoo is for horses.  And dogs.  On the plus side, though, it’s apparently “great on manure stains.”
Orvus is used by conservators because it’s completely Ph-neutral and exceedingly gentle, even more so than Woolite or Dr. Bronners or any other product on the market.  It’s also used by quilters to care for delicate quilts - if you’re buying the small jar, you’ll find it at a quilting store, rather than the feed stores where you’ll find the larger jars.
Now, all of this is getting a bit precious, I know.  I’ve used regular laundry detergent to wash my jeans, and it was just fine.  But there’s no doubt that the process is part of the fun of raw denim, and I’m not going to keep you from buying some Orvus, in case of manure stains.
Plus, I’ve got a dog who needs a shampoo from time to time… and a quilt Nee-Naw made that could use a wash.  That’s it, it’s settled.  Orvus Paste Shampoo it is.

My mother spent several years as a textile conservator.  It was her job to clean and preserve fabrics of all kinds without damaging them for San Francisco’s The Mexican Museum.

When she saw our segment on denim care, she just about exploded out of her seat to send me an email demanding that we use Orvus Paste Shampoo rather than Woolite Dark, which is what we recommended.  And moms are always right.

Let’s start with this admission: Orvus Paste Shampoo is for horses.  And dogs.  On the plus side, though, it’s apparently “great on manure stains.”

Orvus is used by conservators because it’s completely Ph-neutral and exceedingly gentle, even more so than Woolite or Dr. Bronners or any other product on the market.  It’s also used by quilters to care for delicate quilts - if you’re buying the small jar, you’ll find it at a quilting store, rather than the feed stores where you’ll find the larger jars.

Now, all of this is getting a bit precious, I know.  I’ve used regular laundry detergent to wash my jeans, and it was just fine.  But there’s no doubt that the process is part of the fun of raw denim, and I’m not going to keep you from buying some Orvus, in case of manure stains.

Plus, I’ve got a dog who needs a shampoo from time to time… and a quilt Nee-Naw made that could use a wash.  That’s it, it’s settled.  Orvus Paste Shampoo it is.

Tips and Tricks
If you’re looking for an inexpensive alternative to high-end slim jeans, the Levis 514 is a great option, and they’re only $30 or so.  The cut is flattering and contemporary, and while they’re not available raw, the “tumbled rigid” finish is an acceptable substitute.  The rise is low - that’s the distance between the crotch and waistband - so they’re not the best for tucking a shirt into or hiding a little gut, but they look great with a t-shirt.  And of course, if you happen to have beautiful luxury sneakers like the ones pictured above, all the better…

Tips and Tricks

If you’re looking for an inexpensive alternative to high-end slim jeans, the Levis 514 is a great option, and they’re only $30 or so.  The cut is flattering and contemporary, and while they’re not available raw, the “tumbled rigid” finish is an acceptable substitute.  The rise is low - that’s the distance between the crotch and waistband - so they’re not the best for tucking a shirt into or hiding a little gut, but they look great with a t-shirt.  And of course, if you happen to have beautiful luxury sneakers like the ones pictured above, all the better…

Q and Answer
Ben S. writes:
In Episode 1, Denim, you said that one should only wear one piece of denim. If one cannot wear a denim jacket with jeans, what *should* a denim jacket be worn with?
First of all, we want to be clear about one thing: there are some people who look good in a denim jacket and jeans.  These people work harder than you in their jobs and less hard than you on their outfits.  They have very shapely rear ends which are highlighted by a snuff-can fade on their back pockets.  They are badass.  The Marlboro man is a good example.  Hats off to these guys.  More power to ‘em.
There are also “denim heads,” who build their lives around denim.  Mike Hodis, the subject of Episode 1, is a good example.  Usually they are wearing pieces that were originally the same color, but have gained patina over time.  These guys are so committed to their favorite fabric that they can often pull it off.  Even they, though, sometimes look like yutzes.
Our advice is for the other 97% of the population.
Denim jackets are tough to wear, frankly.  That’s why we said that the one piece of denim in your outfit should probably be jeans.  They are entirely possible to wear, though.
Kanye West looks great pairing his denim jacket with chinos, and that’s probably your best bet.  The trick is that they have to be tough guy chinos, not IT-guy chinos.  Khaki pants were developed for the military, not for guys in Dockers commercials, and the closer you get to that practical aesthetic, the better you’ll look with a denim jacket on.  The pants have to be denim alternatives, not dress-pant alternatives.

Q and Answer

Ben S. writes:

In Episode 1, Denim, you said that one should only wear one piece of denim. If one cannot wear a denim jacket with jeans, what *should* a denim jacket be worn with?

First of all, we want to be clear about one thing: there are some people who look good in a denim jacket and jeans.  These people work harder than you in their jobs and less hard than you on their outfits.  They have very shapely rear ends which are highlighted by a snuff-can fade on their back pockets.  They are badass.  The Marlboro man is a good example.  Hats off to these guys.  More power to ‘em.

There are also “denim heads,” who build their lives around denim.  Mike Hodis, the subject of Episode 1, is a good example.  Usually they are wearing pieces that were originally the same color, but have gained patina over time.  These guys are so committed to their favorite fabric that they can often pull it off.  Even they, though, sometimes look like yutzes.

Our advice is for the other 97% of the population.

Denim jackets are tough to wear, frankly.  That’s why we said that the one piece of denim in your outfit should probably be jeans.  They are entirely possible to wear, though.

Kanye West looks great pairing his denim jacket with chinos, and that’s probably your best bet.  The trick is that they have to be tough guy chinos, not IT-guy chinos.  Khaki pants were developed for the military, not for guys in Dockers commercials, and the closer you get to that practical aesthetic, the better you’ll look with a denim jacket on.  The pants have to be denim alternatives, not dress-pant alternatives.

Episode 1: Clothing Credits

What we wore in Episode 1.

Jesse at Rising Sun

Wool plaid shirt by Hirsch and Price (vintage circa 1940s)

APC New Standard jeans

Timberland Boot Company Tackhead (courtesy of Timberland)

Omega Dynamic wristwatch (vintage circa 1970s)

Adam in Rudiments

Put This On Official Work Garb by Dickies (Custom)

Polo Ralph Lauren Belt

Timberland Boot Company Colrain Reissue Chukka (courtesy of Timberland)

Jesse in Q and Answer Introduction

Striped Oxford Shirt by Thom Browne

Brown canvas Slim Guy jeans by Naked & Famous

Arrow Moccasins Lace Boot

Jesse in Q and Answer How-To

Levi’s 501

Button-down oxford by Benjamin Bixby

Adam’s Example Shirts


Button-down slim-fit oxford by Brooks Brothers

Wool plaid shirt by Pendleton (vintage circa 1960s)

Jesse in What To Buy

Harris Tweed sportcoat by Kenneth Mackenzie’s (vintage circa 1950s)

Silk Pocket Square by Robert Talbott

Button-down oxford by Benjamin Bixby

Wool Knit Tie by Cable Car Clothiers, Robert Kirk ltd. (Vintage)

Jeans by 4Stroke Jeans (Courtesy 4Stroke Jeans)

Alden Wingtip Boots in Shell Cordovan

Episode One Funders

We’d like to extend our enduring thanks to the funders of our first episode.

Premier Sponsor:

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Sponsor:

Felt Tip, Inc.

Funding Producers:

Chris Higgins
Christopher Masto
Lucas Wagner

Supporters:

Brady Schwab
Cameron Hunt
Daniel D
David Schimon
Jim Ray
John Dickerson
Justin Bajema
Kim Lisagor
Mark Lisagor
Mattt Thompson
Midnight Wilkinson-Lynn
Rebecca O’Malley
Sam Normington
Scott Simpson

Donors:

Matt Haughey
@Nick_in_SF
Alex Chidester
Attractive Eighties Women
Beau Colburn
Caleb Sexton
Dan Catchpole
Dan Wineman
David Cairns
Davin Pavlas
Doug Tabacco
Ed Kohler
Emily Weise-King
Henry Kaplan
Jamie Tanner
JOEL MADISON
Johanna Schwartz
Johnny Hugel
Jonathan Jackson
Lee Lawlor
Lisa Hollifield
Paul Hughes
Samuel Hansen
Sean Farnum
Tony Zito
Tristan Winch

& dozens of other generous people.